Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

The post Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Last fall, Perelman unofficially shopped the property with a few “quiet” showings for around $65 million, along with a smaller, connected townhouse for a total of around $75 million.

 

That was part of an extraordinary sell-off that included art, one of his Gulfstream jets and a yacht — part of a strategy to “simplify” his life, Perelman said at the time, all while his business had to react to the pandemic-stricken economy.

 

Read the full story on the New York Post here.

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Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views {Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views} – English

Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views {Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views} – English

The post Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The clients had secured a space in a new high-rise, but they soon realized something wasn’t quite right. Partially built out with an emphasis on individual rooms, “The unit was more traditional,” Shafer reports. “They didn’t want to feel boxed in.” Starting from scratch, they took another unit in the building—this time completely unfinished. The switch meant the team could think in terms of an open plan and, of course, the views, which, says the architect, “We used as the engine that drove everything.”

While Shafer and the homeowners embraced an open, light-filled concept, “We didn’t want a one-liner,” the architect says. So he devised a tightly controlled entry sequence to introduce the vistas capturing downtown and the lake. The elevator leads to a jewel box of a foyer and, from there, to the front doors. “Once you open them, there’s a screen wall that serves as the spine of the apartment and makes you contemplate your next move,” explains Shafer. “It’s mysterious and beautiful.” Comprised of vertical wood pickets, the structure creates a peekaboo effect, offering up slivers of the view until the dramatic window wall is fully revealed.

Making that move “was a real trick,” notes Shafer, who worked with builder Ryan Quid. “We had to make sure wherever you were you’d have long vistas through the unit.” His plan allows one to circumnavigate the apartment 270 degrees around the perimeter so that no one feels trapped in a room. It is, however, openness within reason. “With a simple close of a door, the homeowners can shut down the unit,” he notes, thanks to a layered program where public spaces give way to more transitional, semi-public spaces and then the bedrooms.

When it came to the interior design, the husband presented Riker, Dolenc and project lead Erin Humphrey with three words they wished their home to convey: warm, welcoming and timeless. “They were receptive to ideas, and that led down a path of newness,” says Riker. “They wanted modern, but not super trendy.” Adds Humphrey, “We didn’t choose anything that would date itself.”

With those watchwords in mind, the designers opted for furnishings that had classic, crisp profiles but also a subtle flair. Chairs by the wine room have a familiar club feel but stand on bases with brass-toned legs near a cabinet with eglomise door fronts, while the sofa in the family room balances on a chrome base. In the living room, a pair of chairs hints at a klismos form, but overstuffed profiles lend them a funky twist. And the homeowners did bring a few family favorites into their new digs, like a Philip and Kelvin LaVerne coffee table and a pair of Platner chairs. “The wife likes pieces with heritage,” notes Riker, “and we embraced that.”

The designers favored neutral hues with the occasional dash of blue, taking a cues from the sky outside and the Michiko Itatani painting in the living room. Along with the artwork, the team relied on finishes and lighting to serve up big textural and visual moves. They begin in the elevator lobby, which is papered with a scenic de Gournay print and features a book-matched marble floor. Nearby, Riker and company finished a plaster gallery wall for richness. And, knowing that the layout of the living and dining areas couldn’t support a chandelier over the dining table, the team instead centered a fixture over the living area’s coffee table. “It’s quiet but dramatic,” says Riker, “and doesn’t interfere with the art or the views.”

The team upped the ante with yet another touch: a NanaWall that opens up the kitchen to the terrace. “It feels less like apartment living because it affords the ease of going outside,” notes Riker. “It creates a break-out-of-the box feeling.” Which, one could say, is more necessary now than ever before. The flexible layout and nearly panoramic views make for an ideal home during times of quarantine. “Everyone has a place here,” says Riker, adding with a laugh, “so they’re not driving each other crazy.”

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When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges {When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges} – English

When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges {When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges} – English

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It’s a style that his client developed as she built a career that sent her all over the world. Now, however, she was ready to focus not on jet setting, but on creating her dream home. Melott, with his distinct brand of eclectic chic, was just the man to help her conceive that home from scratch. “We’re accustomed to blank canvases,” says the designer. “We enjoy creating a curated story.”

A first matter of business was re-instilling character in the historic dwelling. Originally a single-family residence, the structure had at one point been converted to individual apartments, and later, back to a single-family home with basic finishes. Over these iterations, anything original had been replaced with drywall. For the designer, who describes himself as “not a restoration-guy” and instead “a nod-to-history-guy,” the idea was to bring in an air of patina, as opposed to recreating the home’s provenance as it were. “People don’t necessarily wear vintage clothing, but they’ll wear something emblematic,” he says. Led by this approach, Melott embarked on a renovation alongside general contractor Steve Gonczi.

As a starting point, layers were added to the home’s simple moldings as “a forward-looking take on ornate,” Melott says. To distinguish the foyer, he replaced standard-issue doors with antique wooden pocket doors found in New Orleans and swathed the walls in a rich coat of chocolate brown to strike a traditional chord. Envisioning the original turn-of-the-century layout prompted such additions as the custom-molded honed Nero Marquina marble fireplace surround and airy takes on classical built-in bookshelves, which Melott designed with local fabricator Joel Fisher of Lazuli Studios.

A radical character transformation took place with the high-octane kitchen, which was inspired by the client’s fashion sense. Taking cues from her closet, Melott replaced the existing white Shaker-style cupboards with a glossy black design, which opens onto equally swank living spaces. At the adjacent dining table, chairs with leather stitching pay homage to the client’s love of Chanel, while subtler sartorial strokes continue in the nearby drinks area. There, the sinuous shapes of two creamy velvet club chairs play to the feminine curves of the new fireplace.

As a self-made executive who grew up in a family of tradesmen and tradeswomen, another high priority for the client was championing local talents. “The idea of having things made by passionate, local hands felt right for my home,” she explains. “There’s the piece of supporting families in the community, but there’s also the matter of sustainability and doing right by the environment.” Melott responded enthusiastically, hitting the town for vintage pieces, peppering in contemporary furnishings and lighting, and finalizing the details with a chorus of local ceramicists, painters and makers. “Ninety-nice percent of the art in this home is local,” he confirms.

As with all great design, here, aspiration merges with function, pretty with practical.Upholstery fabrics chosen for their high durability score and a lack of rugs throughout cater to the client’s two cats, while amenities like personalized lighting solutions and discreet charging ports make working from the home’s many comfortable perches a breeze, especially in the COVID-19 landscape.

“Everything we do is a reflection of the people we do it for,” Melott says—a philosophy carried through from initial sit-down to final flourish. Case in point: Over one margarita-fueled meeting, the client shared that her grandmother—who had 10 children and never finished high school—avidly read National Geographic. When she walked into her newly designed home, the client found a tidy stack of antique issues sourced from near and far. “He brought me gorgeous, high design, but somehow, he brought my roots to me, too,” the client shares. At the walk-though, she adds, “I felt like I was walking into my house, my parents’ house, my grandparents’ house. It was the most unbelievable feeling of coming home.”

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Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home {Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home} – English

Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home {Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home} – English

The post Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


True love is one of the greatest joys in life. Just ask Henry Givray, former CEO of a management company and creator of a comprehensive leadership learning program, and his wife, Jill Alberts, a notable jewelry designer and owner of a North Shore, Chicago boutique. Yet their present-day romance comes with a backstory. After losing his first wife to cancer four years ago, Henry knew he couldn’t bear to remain in the Bucktown home they had built together from scratch. He wanted a place to create new memories for himself and his two grown daughters, so he settled on a three-bedroom condo in a downtown high-rise building and turned to designer Sarah Vaile to create a warm, inviting space that he expected to be in for the long term.

But Henry soon discovered that life is unpredictable. Within the year, he met Jill and realized that falling in love doesn’t have to be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. “I often will ask, ‘How did I get to be lucky twice in finding something that is so rare and meaningful when most people don’t even get it once?’ ” Henry says. It was time to move out of the condo and into a new home where the couple could grow old together.

For their newly constructed Glencoe home, Henry once again enlisted Vaile. “When Henry called to tell me he felt this way and was relocating to the North Shore, my heart just burst for him,” Vaile recalls. The six-bedroom residence was awash with white-and-gray walls, white marble and an overwhelming two dozen chandeliers and sconces. “We saw a lot of houses,” says Jill, who admits they replaced 14 of the chandeliers and 11 of the sconces. “This was the right one, but it was sort of fancy and cold.” The advantage to this, however, was that it was a blank canvas. After swapping design visions, Pinterest boards and wish list items (an all-black office for Jill, a redesigned home theater by Cinetec for Henry), Henry handed over the reins to Vaile and Jill. “We turned this house on its head,” says Vaile. “We painted or wallpapered pretty much every square inch.”

Jill’s style and personality led the way with the design. Vaile layered new pieces with wares from Jill’s former home and finds from her travels, including Moroccan wedding blankets and an Eero Saarinen Tulip table. “Jill was most definitely our project muse. Every object in her lifelong collection had deep meaning and a great story to go along with it,” says Vaile. “It was both a bit daunting and wildly liberating to decorate for such a design-forward client.”

One of Jill’s initial design ideas—that requested all-black home office—was inspired by a space she’d seen in a magazine years before. “I saved the page, thinking, ‘One day I’ll have an office like this,’” she recalls. “I showed it to Sarah and she loved it and brought it to life.” They also outfitted the room with an enlarged vintage magazine cover, a settee covered in oyster-hued fabric and a nearly 6-foot wood-and-plaster statue of the Buddhist goddess Guanyin. “I’m not a yogi, but she’s the goddess of peace and I thought she was special,” says Jill.

Vaile and Jill worked together to incorporate these bold, eclectic and whimsical touches throughout the home—a painting in the kitchen by Spanish-born artist Rosana Sitcha procured by Jill and Henry on one of their first trips as a couple to Santa Fe, a vintage elephant tusk table that serves as a natural partition between the kitchen and the breakfast room, a palm wallpaper and a vintage 1970s buffet in the dining room. “We liked to joke that buffet had seen its fair share of wild parties,” laughs Vaile.

For Henry, who only brought with him a desk, a poker table and a jukebox, the most important aspect of the home is the meaningful pieces that Jill worked with Vaile to incorporate. “The furniture, rugs and wall treatments are only half the story,” says Henry, who shares an affinity for collecting action figures with Jill’s son, Jack, and has a pair of light sabers from Star Wars on display in the basement rec room. “What makes it all so incredible is all of the extras, like the wall of family photos going up the staircase.”

It’s clear that, apart from preserving past and present in their newly completed home, Jill and Henry are living their best life. “It’s the space to create meaningful memories,” says Henry. “We have a lot of what I call ‘fun rooms’ in the house, but we have a lot of great accents. It feels safe, relaxing and comfortable.”

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A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood {A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood} – English

A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood {A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood} – English

The post A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

This December, L.A. welcomes The Britely, a new social club perched high atop the Pendry West Hollywood hotel on Sunset Boulevard. To engage a diverse clientele from different backgrounds and industries, Swedish designer Martin Brudnizki was tapped to come up with a vibrant design that is youthful yet rooted in old Hollywood style. “I hope it will offer members and their guests a feeling of escapism and fantasy,” says Brudnizki. “It’s fun to design a scheme that has surprises,” he adds, noting the gold ceiling and pink ostrich-feather lamps. “These lighthearted touches enhance the ambience, and the result is a place that feels sensual, tactile and seductive.” Club amenities include a music venue, screening room, bowling lanes, three private lounges, a gym and spa, a rooftop pool and two members-only restaurant concepts by none other than iconic chef Wolfgang Puck. thebritely.com

RENDERING COURTESY THE BRITELY

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Street Art With Je Ne Sais Quoi Livens Up Los Angeles {Street Art With Je Ne Sais Quoi Livens Up Los Angeles} – English

Street Art With Je Ne Sais Quoi Livens Up Los Angeles {Street Art With Je Ne Sais Quoi Livens Up Los Angeles} – English

The post Street Art With Je Ne Sais Quoi Livens Up Los Angeles appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

WHO: French-born street artist Punk Me Tender keeps his identity secret, but his works have amassed a celebrity following.

WHAT: Whether it’s graffiti, painting or photography, his pieces are imbued with the fantastical and the unexpected. Recent projects include a mural at the Line Hotel’s new club, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, and a pop-up at Fred Segal Sunset.

WHY: Inspiration comes from the intersection of gritty street life and couture fashion, which the artist takes to a hyper-glamorous state with dynamic colors and painting techniques, Swarovski crystals and silk flowers.

IN HIS WORDS: “I love to utilize Instagram to showcase my artwork. It allows for an unfiltered exchange of emotions with the audience and I can focus on my artwork, not my appearance. The beauty of Instagram is its ability make an image travel the world virtually. No other platform can do this for you.”

orange, yellow and red butterfly

man on top of blue building

PHOTOS COURTESY PUNK ME TENDER

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Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

The post Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

On the home's second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

On the home’s second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room's coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room’s coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

"This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills," says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

“This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills,” says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

"Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious," says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

“Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious,” says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

In interior design, chain reactions are common. It often goes like this: A new sofa makes the old armchairs look a little worn, so they are reupholstered. The fresh seats make the existing rug seem out of place and the old drapes look wrong, so they are both replaced. It’s that type of scenario that designer Mikhail Dantes found himself in when Thomas Madden, a single dad with a young daughter, approached him about furnishing his newly acquired home in Denver’s coveted Wash Park neighborhood. During an early walk-through Thomas nonchalantly indicated a chip in the kitchen counter and asked if it could be replaced. To which Dantes replied that changing the top would probably mean the old sink had to go, and then the cabinets might not look right, and well, you can guess what happened next. “From that one little chip we moved into a whole house remodel and before we knew it we were taking the interior down to the studs,” says Dantes.

“The house had great bones, but I really wanted something more modern,” says Thomas, who was drawn to Dantes’ knack for making neutral palettes inviting and minimalist interiors both elegant and livable. Along with those attributes the designer’s take-no-prisoners approach to any form of excess has become an accepted part of his signature style. “No case, no base, no trim,” Dantes says about refreshing this home. “We recreated the architecture inside by stripping down superfluous decoration.”

Putting the initial “furnishings only” request on hold the designer first tackled the more pressing issues of reassigning rooms and eliminating any references to the home’s Tuscan ambience–distressed cabinets and faux plaster walls in mottled shades of red, taupe and blue topping the casualty list. In short order the master bathroom and closet were reorganized to create more storage space, three cramped upper-level guest rooms were merged into two larger spaces, and all evidence of faux stone mantles, columns and other Italian accents vanished.

Paramount to the reinvention was a thoughtful layering of new materials starting with lightly stained walnut floors, and walls coated in Dantes go-to Benjamin Moore shade of Super White. In the living room, the monolithic limestone-wrapped fireplace with suede padded tiles above the mantel would normally be the sole statement piece, but in the open layout the kitchen’s mix of lacquer and dark oak cabinets also draws you in. Add to that the ceiling, where large collaged pieces of lacquered tea paper line the spaces between the coffers, causing all eyes gazing up. “I wanted to add a pattern that was more organic to contrast with all the clean lines,” Dantes says. “And when you’re lying on the sofa it’s nice to look up and see something wonderful.”

Still Dantes insists it is not any one thing that stands out in the great room but rather the amalgamation that makes it successful. “There’s a lot going on, but the trick was how to make all those elements blend in a peaceful cohesive way,” says the designer, who also added nubby linen upholstery on the sofa and a hand-knotted wool rug on the floor as textural interjections. “The quietness and subtlety of the palette makes it possible to layer many things without any one thing being in your face.”

Throughout, there are geometry lessons. In the dining room, for example, the console table’s metal frame mimics the linear pattern of the hide-on-hair rug, with the blocks and lines on the wall art providing the perfect complement. “I took my cues from the grid pattern created by the coffered ceiling in the living room,” Dantes says. In the lower-level media room stripes and cubes depicted in the artwork reinforce the pattern subtheme in the rug and in the dramatic fireplace with book-matched marble.

In the master bedroom, a wooly sheepskin rug and suede wallcovering soften the tone-on-tone space, but the latter required a little convincing. “There was this over-the-top gold accent wall I saw that I thought would be perfect,” the homeowner shares. “But Mikhail nicely suggested that I might get tired of it and gently steered me toward the suede instead, which I really love.”

Steering his clients in the direction of longevity is another part of Dantes enduring design philosophy. “My approach with every client is the same,” he says. “No tricks or gimmicks–and whatever the style, it’s about beautiful pieces mixed together to create beautiful rooms.”

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