Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

The post Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Though it may sound cliché, when it comes to big life decisions, it’s often best to trust your gut. This is what one San Francisco couple did during their hunt for a new family home. Over the course of one day, the husband and wife toured seven classic Victorians,

but—although they were all beautiful—“none of them resonated with us,” the husband says. Then, at the end of the day, they walked into a 1909 Prairie-style mansion designed by architect Charles Frederick Whittlesey. “My wife turned to me and said, ‘I want this house,’” he recalls. “I had the same feeling. I immediately fell in love with the history.”

Staying true to that history was important, as was creating a functional space that catered to their needs as a contemporary family. The couple turned to their trusted designer, Kristi Will, who has worked with them on five other homes. “Kristi was the secret sauce,” says the husband. Will’s depth of understanding of interior architecture laid the groundwork for her design. “For me it always starts with the architecture of the house,” says Will, who brought on her longtime general contractor collaborator, Bryan Falvey, for structural changes. “I tried to imagine, if we were collaborating with Charles Whittlesey today, what would our dialogue be?”

That conversation began with the details. “We wanted to preserve as much of the classic 1909 architecture as we could,” says the husband. “I told Kristi that I didn’t want to do things like rip out the staircase. She said, ‘OK, then let’s paint it black.’ ” Will also played up architectural accents such as the moldings on the main level, bringing in decorative painter Katherine Jacobus to coat the dental work in gold leaf. “We wanted everything to feel like it had been completed at the same time as the home,” the designer explains.

The kitchen, with its walnut island and brass accents, is a prime example. “We didn’t want it to feel too modern,” Will says. “I like timeless, classic interiors. I want to walk back into the home in 20 years and know I would still select the same things.” So, for any contemporary accents she chose, such as a mosaic backsplash by Ellen Blakeley, she kept the look fresh without feeling trendy. “It adds a little bit of modern sparkle to the kitchen, but nods to the history of the house,” the designer notes.

Will took advantage of the existing layout, which, while not an open plan in today’s sense, still had a natural flow between the living spaces thanks to the stunning city vistas that carry through the living, sitting and dining rooms as well as the office. “What struck me was the architecture and the connectivity to the views,” the designer remarks. “Although they’re divided rooms, it feels like an open floor plan.” Building upon that easy transition, Will started with a warm, neutral palette for a cozy elegance throughout the dwelling. “We told her we wanted a light and bright feel to the house,” says the husband. “There’s so much energy in the city. We wanted a calming place to be.” Shades of taupe, tan, ivory and gold permeate the rooms, and she carried through the walnut wood accents found in the kitchen (a favorite of the homeowners) into other spaces, such as the main bathroom. “It’s our go-to wood,” the husband says. “It’s so beautiful and timeless, rich and warm.”

The neutral tones didn’t prevent Will, who knew her clients’ passion for pattern, texture and color, from going bold in some of the spaces. In the dining room she commissioned local craftsman Thomas Fetherston to create a red lacquer cabinet that displays statues the homeowners found on a trip to Thailand. More of the couple’s art collection is found in the cozy library, which showcases a multitude of red and orange shades. Will also brought orange into the cheeky power room, covering the walls in a classic de Gournay monkey pattern in a nod to the husband’s penchant for the animal. “They’re a playful and young family,” the designer says. “They were definitely OK with whimsy.”

This intimate understanding of the clients’ personalities—from their passion for design to their easy family lifestyle—is what Will credits for the success of the project. That and the house itself. As she notes, “It’s really about going back to the fundamentals of historical architecture.”

The post Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

The post Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City appeared first on Wealth-X.

Revlon billionaire Ronald Perelman has publicly listed his Lenox Hill townhouse at 36 E. 63rd St. for $60 million.

Last fall, Perelman unofficially shopped the property with a few “quiet” showings for around $65 million, along with a smaller, connected townhouse for a total of around $75 million.

That was part of an extraordinary sell-off that included art, one of his Gulfstream jets and a yacht — part of a strategy to “simplify” his life, Perelman said at the time, all while his business had to react to the pandemic-stricken economy.

Read the full story on the New York Post here.

The post Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City appeared first on Wealth-X.

Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

The post Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

On the home's second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

On the home’s second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room's coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room’s coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

"This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills," says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

“This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills,” says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

"Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious," says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

“Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious,” says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

In interior design, chain reactions are common. It often goes like this: A new sofa makes the old armchairs look a little worn, so they are reupholstered. The fresh seats make the existing rug seem out of place and the old drapes look wrong, so they are both replaced. It’s that type of scenario that designer Mikhail Dantes found himself in when Thomas Madden, a single dad with a young daughter, approached him about furnishing his newly acquired home in Denver’s coveted Wash Park neighborhood. During an early walk-through Thomas nonchalantly indicated a chip in the kitchen counter and asked if it could be replaced. To which Dantes replied that changing the top would probably mean the old sink had to go, and then the cabinets might not look right, and well, you can guess what happened next. “From that one little chip we moved into a whole house remodel and before we knew it we were taking the interior down to the studs,” says Dantes.

“The house had great bones, but I really wanted something more modern,” says Thomas, who was drawn to Dantes’ knack for making neutral palettes inviting and minimalist interiors both elegant and livable. Along with those attributes the designer’s take-no-prisoners approach to any form of excess has become an accepted part of his signature style. “No case, no base, no trim,” Dantes says about refreshing this home. “We recreated the architecture inside by stripping down superfluous decoration.”

Putting the initial “furnishings only” request on hold the designer first tackled the more pressing issues of reassigning rooms and eliminating any references to the home’s Tuscan ambience–distressed cabinets and faux plaster walls in mottled shades of red, taupe and blue topping the casualty list. In short order the master bathroom and closet were reorganized to create more storage space, three cramped upper-level guest rooms were merged into two larger spaces, and all evidence of faux stone mantles, columns and other Italian accents vanished.

Paramount to the reinvention was a thoughtful layering of new materials starting with lightly stained walnut floors, and walls coated in Dantes go-to Benjamin Moore shade of Super White. In the living room, the monolithic limestone-wrapped fireplace with suede padded tiles above the mantel would normally be the sole statement piece, but in the open layout the kitchen’s mix of lacquer and dark oak cabinets also draws you in. Add to that the ceiling, where large collaged pieces of lacquered tea paper line the spaces between the coffers, causing all eyes gazing up. “I wanted to add a pattern that was more organic to contrast with all the clean lines,” Dantes says. “And when you’re lying on the sofa it’s nice to look up and see something wonderful.”

Still Dantes insists it is not any one thing that stands out in the great room but rather the amalgamation that makes it successful. “There’s a lot going on, but the trick was how to make all those elements blend in a peaceful cohesive way,” says the designer, who also added nubby linen upholstery on the sofa and a hand-knotted wool rug on the floor as textural interjections. “The quietness and subtlety of the palette makes it possible to layer many things without any one thing being in your face.”

Throughout, there are geometry lessons. In the dining room, for example, the console table’s metal frame mimics the linear pattern of the hide-on-hair rug, with the blocks and lines on the wall art providing the perfect complement. “I took my cues from the grid pattern created by the coffered ceiling in the living room,” Dantes says. In the lower-level media room stripes and cubes depicted in the artwork reinforce the pattern subtheme in the rug and in the dramatic fireplace with book-matched marble.

In the master bedroom, a wooly sheepskin rug and suede wallcovering soften the tone-on-tone space, but the latter required a little convincing. “There was this over-the-top gold accent wall I saw that I thought would be perfect,” the homeowner shares. “But Mikhail nicely suggested that I might get tired of it and gently steered me toward the suede instead, which I really love.”

Steering his clients in the direction of longevity is another part of Dantes enduring design philosophy. “My approach with every client is the same,” he says. “No tricks or gimmicks–and whatever the style, it’s about beautiful pieces mixed together to create beautiful rooms.”

The post Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City {A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City} – English

A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City {A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City} – English

The post A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Nancy S. Weinman left her native Manhattan for the Southwest as a college student. Yet even though the architect and designer fell in love with the region instantly and knew it would become her home, she looks back on her place of birth frequently–and to great effect. In the five years she’s been practicing in Arizona, Weinman–who has offices in Sedona and New York City– become known for a contemporary style that respects her adopted region’s aesthetic while borrowing ideas, materials and inspiration that initially might seem more at home among actual skyscrapers than skyscraping red rocks.

For the Sedona residence she shares with her husband, Richard S. Witlin, built on a 4-acre lot facing the iconic Cathedral Rock, Weinman eschewed the adobe-and-viga territorial style that predominates in the area, opting instead for a clean, open, light-flooded structure that quite literally reflects the surrounding environment. The lacquered-white cabinetry in the kitchen, for instance, is inspired by contemporary Italian design, she says, and certainly “isn’t the norm in Arizona.” Nevertheless its glossy surfaces act as a mirror for the scenery through the windows, “picking up the juniper trees that surround the home,” she explains. Likewise, some people buy throw pillows to complement the fabric of a nearby chair or rug; Weinman selected the clay-colored velvet for the pillows adorning her bed based on the way “their sheen mimics the color changes in the landscape,” she says.

Although they were only half-seriously thinking about moving when a real estate agent showed them the site three years ago, Weinman and Witlin were so transfixed by the location and views that they made an offer almost instantly. The architectural brief was a classic example of something that’s simple without being easy.

Weinman envisioned a linear plan: a rectangular box with an eastern facade done almost entirely in glass, “because that eastern view”–of Cathedral Rock and its impressive sandstone cohort–“is so enormous, you want to capture as much of it as you can,” she says. Over time, she would deconstruct that original rectangular box little by little, adding alcoves here and carving out private spaces there until a home had emerged.

To maximize the stellar views, which take in the desert grounds by landscape architect Pete Cure, Weinman worked with builder Bill Brann to arrange the house around a massive central volume, a 50-foot-long great room–comprising the living area, kitchen and dining area–whose full length of glass dazzlingly frames the Red Rock tableau to the east. Two-thirds of the glass can be slid into a center pocket wall, erasing any physical barrier separating the living and dining areas from the outdoors. “We don’t even have seating on the patio,” Weinman notes, “because you can just sit in the living area with the glass all the way open.”

Surfaces in this great room were chosen for not only their material elegance but also their ability to reflect light. “The couch is off-white, the wall tile has a kind of white limestone feel, and the floors are sort of a grayish porcelain–it looks like concrete but much more re ned,” Weinman says. In the entryway, facets of a wall-mounted black ceramic tile scatter reflected light kaleidoscopically. The feature provides an early clue “that this whole place is about reflectivity: It’s a reflection of what’s outside,” Weinman says. It’s also, she admits, “a little Manhattan-ish. Not a hundred percent. But I wanted to bring that in, because that is who I am.”

By playing three roles at once–architect, designer and client–Weinman was able to see the house in its harmonious totality at all points along the way. “It meant the ideas came together earlier than normal in the process,” she says. With so much information swirling in her head and accessible in her notes, every action and purchase was subtly informed by every other action and purchase. “For instance, a partition behind the headboard in the master bedroom was adjusted, prior to drywall, to match perfectly,” she says. “And the replace boxes were designed on-site to match the exact dimensions of artwork that was in storage during the build-out.” During a shopping trip in India, she knew a particular rug would go perfectly in a room before the space had even been constructed, because “I had the floor plan drawing and dimensions with me at all times,” she says.

Weinman’s incorporation of unexpected elements into the home has piqued interest, thanks to her astute vision. “If I pick something o the shelf in New York and bring it to Sedona,” she says, “people are like: ‘Wow, that’s so fresh and contemporary!’ Quartz countertops, Italian cabinets and large-format tiles from Spain–some people here may have never seen it, but they like it, and they want it. You just have to make sure you’re doing it in a way that works with everything else–including the view out your window.

The post A Stylish Sedona Home Channels A Bit Of The Big City appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

The post A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Kelly Hohla is a designer who considers her options and leaves nothing to chance. So, when her clients began creating their dream home on the San Francisco Peninsula, she studied everything carefully. For example, when the couple wanted a turquoise La Cornue stove as the kitchen’s centerpiece, Hohla suggested a cooking class to provide a test drive of the French classic. “Best to know ahead of time if it would function for their family as well as be beautiful in the space,” she reasons. A similar weighing of options was employed when pinpointing the precise shade for the lacquered cabinets in the adjoining butler’s pantry. “We needed a deep green in the turquoise realm that speaks to the range without being too matchy,” she says about the winning teal hue.

Those are just two of the many thoughtfully considered details that followed–but before there was a stove, cabinets or colors, there was just a 2-acre property containing a thicket of old trees and an unremarkable house. “You couldn’t even walk in the backyard,” recalls landscape designer Andrea Kovol who, with landscape architect Ron Lutsko Jr., eliminated all the invasive species and planted new trees along the perimeter of the property to both define and screen the plot.

That south-facing clearing became the anchor for a sprawling family home where the owners hoped to escape the strife of city living. “We left San Francisco for better weather and a yard,” says the wife, who had grown weary of driving around the city searching for a park where her three young offspring could play. “We were building a ground-up house and other than big windows and lots of light, we really didn’t know what we wanted.”

Early conversations with architect Richard Beard revealed otherwise. “They didn’t want anything overtly traditional, but definitely not aggressively modern either,” says Beard. “Incorporating family was essential.” He honored those wishes with a large dwelling that reads as a series of intersecting structures built with stone, cedar and dark steel and surrounded by a number of outdoor spaces for living and play. The home, built by general contractor Bryan Murphy, is new, but the assemblage of contrasting materials implies a sense of age, modernity and originality.

Hohla, in concert with designer Alana Dorn, embraced that balance of old and new in the interiors. This is the third project Hohla worked on for this family, so she was familiar with their previous residences, including the one before this, which featured traditional rooms outfitted with French, Italian and English antiques. But in this case, the designer thought the new home should not be a case of history repeating itself. “I have been dreaming about this house for this family for a long time. From the beginning, we determined that it should have more of a clean-lined and edited feel,” she says. “We wanted to incorporate some of the antiques, but in a more modern way.”

That line of thinking gives rise to the amenable mingling in the living room of a tailored sofa with a gently curving back and a pair of more ornate antique side tables (one adorned with an elaborate mother-of-pearl inlay, and the other with gilded accents). The classic, wingback style of a pair of vintage Paul Frankl seats and Holly Hunt armchairs play against the striking lines of custom-designed coffee tables with aged-brass bases and natural stone tops. And, while an heirloom duet of curling Pierre Cardin table lamps adds a flourish to the room, it’s a brass chandelier reminiscent of a cascade of bangle bracelets that brings the drama while dangling from the 14-foot-high ceiling. “I’m obsessed with light fixtures,” Hohla says. “They are the jewelry of a room and the first thing your eye goes to.” The stylish mix is one of the features that makes this the wife’s favorite room in the house.

In addition to the layering of old and new, Hohla went the extra mile when combining textures and lines. “I come from a family of engineers and I lay things out in a very planned way,” she explains. In the master bedroom, where Hohla wanted a serene and ethereal environment, she commissioned decorative artist Willem Racké to create lacquer walls with a subtle strié pattern done in soft colors. This is a counterpoint to tailored elements such as the custom bed, settee and embroidered ottoman and the bolder Ralph Pucci lounge chairs, Hervé Van der Straeten bronze light fixture and the contemporary painting. As in the rest of the house, vintage alabaster lamps and demilune nightstands add traditional touches in the new structure.

Unifying classic and contemporary elements was an aesthetic the designer carefully negotiated and considered. “The homeowners’ main concern was always about going too modern and mine was about staying too traditional,” Hohla shares. “I wanted them to have an updated home that feels timeless and that they can grow in–I think we were able to strike the perfect balance.”

The post A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

The post Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

It wasn’t interior designer Suzanne Childress’ preservation chops that landed her a job updating an 1890s bungalow in Ashland, Oregon—rather, it was her love of wallpaper. Her clients, San Francisco-based Kirsten Ziegler and her husband, J Frederick, had bought it as a second home a decade earlier and decided it was time to renovate. They were finalizing plans with general contractor Brad Youngs, of Brad Youngs Construction, when Kirsten saw a project that Childress had done. “I was searching online for ‘cool, modern wallpaper,’ and there was an image of a design by Suzanne that grabbed me,” she recalls.

Childress did more than select an assortment of dramatic wallpapers for the project, though. She proposed a series of structural changes that made the 1,000-square-foot house at once functional and inviting—from moving walls and reconfiguring rooms to outfitting the spaces with creative storage solutions. “I love old houses,” says Childress, who once worked as an attorney with the Environmental Protection Agency. Her side gig—redoing her historic home in Annapolis, Maryland—set the stage for a major career shift and an eventual move west. “If a house has quality bones, then I’m all about working them into a new design concept,” she says. “But this house was a real patchwork; there wasn’t anything worth preserving.”

Kirsten and J, who both work in the tech world, embraced her suggestions. “We were so enamored with the home’s location—we’re a block from the theater complex and can walk to downtown,” says Kirsten. “It certainly wasn’t because the house was so gigantic or because the interior was so darling.”

That meant a gut renovation and installing all new floors, windows and moldings. Childress tweaked the plans to transform what had been envisioned as a semi open-plan kitchen into a more traditional space. She also worked with Youngs, who has since retired, and his team to bump out a wall to include a small eating area. What the house lacked in size, it made up for in vertical space, so Childress capitalized on the high ceilings, tucking base and top cabinets everywhere she could. What was once a second bedroom became a cozy parlor featuring a two-sided fireplace that opens to the adjacent living room. Childress was also able to carve out two additional spaces for the couple: a tiny study and a nook that holds a sofa and a TV.

Finding a balance between old and new was her goal. “Kirsten and J were worried when I suggested dropping in more doorways,” says Childress, “but the spaces would have been too busy had we left them open. Now the rooms unfold as you walk through them.”

Taking a cue from what Childress calls “the rock-and-roll edge to Kirsten’s style,” the designer incorporated deep tones to dramatic effect. She set off the gray-painted walls in the living room and part of the kitchen with black moldings and window frames. In the parlor, she paired black gloss paint with a similarly hued imitation crocodile wallcovering for an atmospheric air, accented by touches of gold and brass in the furnishings and hardware. Finished in black paint with brown undertones, the kitchen cabinetry creates a striking foil to the marble-like porcelain counter and backsplash as well as the upper cabinets stained a rich brown. “It took a lot of rounds to get the stain right, but it plays so nicely with the tones of the brass and black,” Childress notes. “Brad had the knowledge and expertise to make it happen.”

Considering the diverse wallcoverings that Childress selected, Kirsten and J are hard-pressed to name a favorite. J leans toward the woodland animal paper in the study, while Kirsten says that though she was initially unsure about the enchanted-forest-themed print in the master bedroom—appropriately called Midsummer Night—she now loves it. “I wondered if I was going to hate it in six months because it’s so different, but J really liked it,” she says. “We looked at other ones, but I said, ‘Let’s just do it,’ and I’m so glad we did. It’s really sultry and ethereal with the lights on.”

Childress believes the fact that the couple lived in the house before they started renovating is key to the project’s success. “It’s nice if you can get the idea of the flow and what’s working and what’s not. I’m always curious when a client says, ‘Oh, we never go in there’ or ‘We never use that.’ Most of us can’t afford to have rooms you never go in,” she says. “You need to make the most of all your spaces. That was what I wanted to do here—to make all the rooms spaces they really wanted to be in and enjoy.”

The post Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again {A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again} – English

A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again {A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again} – English

The post A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

It’s a very consistent house,” says architect Ken Linsteadt about a Georgian-style beauty he and a dedicated team brought back to life for clients who had fallen in love with it at first sight. “It’s a little bit more tailored than a traditional house of its type might typically be. The furniture is not jumping out as modern, and it’s very calm.”

The transformation of the Atherton, California, home — which originally featured yellow shingles, poor geometry and a rather neglected garden — can be attributed to Linsteadt’s architectural prowess, designer Marie Turner Carson’s sensitive handling of the furnishings and the tasteful fixed finish selection of designers Carol Knorpp and Kerry Bogardus.

“We took the narrative of the clients, who liked cleaner, more contemporary things,” says Carson. “They wanted to feel like they were in this stately home, but with fresh and current interiors.”

Home builder Ed Faubel’s paneling work helped bring the interior setting together, and landscape designer Janell Denler Hobart expanded the original gardens while adding to their natural beauty. The project is pulled together by a long, windowed breezeway, one of Linsteadt’s favorite parts of the new house.

The post A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

There are many reasons to update a home: to make it more current, to expand, or simply to change things up.

All of the above applied for the owners of an Aspen house, but the couple also found another, far more unique reason to invest in a big renovation: uninvited bears.

“They came in through the screens before we had air conditioning,” the wife explains, noting that one giant even feasted on leftover birthday cake.

In addition to adding A/C, interior designer Maria Bordelon and architect Gretchen Greenwood took the home in a more modern direction by installing metal-frame windows, incorporating textural furnishings and introducing unique accents, such as a console table with a glossy automotive finish and beaten copper wall panels.

“We used metals throughout the house but very judiciously to provide a little relief from the heavier materials,” Bordelon explains, noting the result is a far cry from the look the dwelling sported in the 1993 cult film Aspen Extreme when it had a swimming pool in the basement and a rather dated sunken conversation pit. “Everywhere the owners look, something is beautiful, and they enjoy that as their daily environment.”

The post An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

When it came down to the transformation of his 1,800-square-foot co-op, advertising executive Bob Jeffrey tapped architect Luca Andrisani to take on the task.

In addition to sharing a passion for Italy, the two bonded over a love of modern design, Italian movies and the joys of storytelling.

“It’s hard for me to design without meaning, to just make something pretty,” says Andrisani.

The almost obsessive details in one particular movie, “I Am Love,” set in Milan’s 1930s-built Villa Nechhi, raised the design bar.

To update the interiors of the apartment, builder Chip Brian gutted two bathrooms, expanded the kitchen and reconfigured the powder room. He also created a new pass-through room that houses the client’s collection of John F. Kennedy memorabilia.

Artisans at Atelier Viollet created luxurious wall surfaces with cane, goatskin (parchment) and straw marquetry. Macassar ebony and rift sawn whitewashed oak also provide rich backdrops for the furnishings — mostly a mix of midcentury Italian, punctuated with lush cashmeres, mohair velvets and silks.

“I always worked with very strong creative people,” says Bob. “Luca raised the bar for interior design. For me, aesthetics are key. And this place is a work of art.”

The post A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

In the cooler autumn months, Matt and Paige Shoberg and their young sons enjoy the open and airy space overlooking the swimming pool and spa behind their home in West Lake Hills, Texas. Furman + Keil Architects completely reimagined the residence with a new plaster skin and two new additions. “It’s so peaceful,” explains the busy mother. “I don’t get a lot of peace.”

The original abode’s traditional red brick gave way to thick plaster, with its multiple gables and adornments eliminated in favor of streamlined standing seam metal detail running underneath the roofline. A steel and glass bridge, which houses the dining room, passes over a dip in the land, connecting the existing structure to one of the home’s two new wings.

While Matt, a home builder, executed the architects’ vision for the new additions and completely reconfigured the interior, Paige worked with interior designer Wendy Williamson to select finishes and furnishings.

“With almost every selection on this house, we asked, ‘Have we seen it before?’ And if the answer was ‘yes,’ we didn’t want to do it,” Paige explains, pointing to the black slate flooring and bespoke light fixtures throughout. “We love it here.”

The post A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.