Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

The post Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


but—although they were all beautiful—“none of them resonated with us,” the husband says. Then, at the end of the day, they walked into a 1909 Prairie-style mansion designed by architect Charles Frederick Whittlesey. “My wife turned to me and said, ‘I want this house,’” he recalls. “I had the same feeling. I immediately fell in love with the history.”

Staying true to that history was important, as was creating a functional space that catered to their needs as a contemporary family. The couple turned to their trusted designer, Kristi Will, who has worked with them on five other homes. “Kristi was the secret sauce,” says the husband. Will’s depth of understanding of interior architecture laid the groundwork for her design. “For me it always starts with the architecture of the house,” says Will, who brought on her longtime general contractor collaborator, Bryan Falvey, for structural changes. “I tried to imagine, if we were collaborating with Charles Whittlesey today, what would our dialogue be?”

That conversation began with the details. “We wanted to preserve as much of the classic 1909 architecture as we could,” says the husband. “I told Kristi that I didn’t want to do things like rip out the staircase. She said, ‘OK, then let’s paint it black.’ ” Will also played up architectural accents such as the moldings on the main level, bringing in decorative painter Katherine Jacobus to coat the dental work in gold leaf. “We wanted everything to feel like it had been completed at the same time as the home,” the designer explains.

The kitchen, with its walnut island and brass accents, is a prime example. “We didn’t want it to feel too modern,” Will says. “I like timeless, classic interiors. I want to walk back into the home in 20 years and know I would still select the same things.” So, for any contemporary accents she chose, such as a mosaic backsplash by Ellen Blakeley, she kept the look fresh without feeling trendy. “It adds a little bit of modern sparkle to the kitchen, but nods to the history of the house,” the designer notes.

Will took advantage of the existing layout, which, while not an open plan in today’s sense, still had a natural flow between the living spaces thanks to the stunning city vistas that carry through the living, sitting and dining rooms as well as the office. “What struck me was the architecture and the connectivity to the views,” the designer remarks. “Although they’re divided rooms, it feels like an open floor plan.” Building upon that easy transition, Will started with a warm, neutral palette for a cozy elegance throughout the dwelling. “We told her we wanted a light and bright feel to the house,” says the husband. “There’s so much energy in the city. We wanted a calming place to be.” Shades of taupe, tan, ivory and gold permeate the rooms, and she carried through the walnut wood accents found in the kitchen (a favorite of the homeowners) into other spaces, such as the main bathroom. “It’s our go-to wood,” the husband says. “It’s so beautiful and timeless, rich and warm.”

The neutral tones didn’t prevent Will, who knew her clients’ passion for pattern, texture and color, from going bold in some of the spaces. In the dining room she commissioned local craftsman Thomas Fetherston to create a red lacquer cabinet that displays statues the homeowners found on a trip to Thailand. More of the couple’s art collection is found in the cozy library, which showcases a multitude of red and orange shades. Will also brought orange into the cheeky power room, covering the walls in a classic de Gournay monkey pattern in a nod to the husband’s penchant for the animal. “They’re a playful and young family,” the designer says. “They were definitely OK with whimsy.”

This intimate understanding of the clients’ personalities—from their passion for design to their easy family lifestyle—is what Will credits for the success of the project. That and the house itself. As she notes, “It’s really about going back to the fundamentals of historical architecture.”

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Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City {Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City} – English

The post Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Last fall, Perelman unofficially shopped the property with a few “quiet” showings for around $65 million, along with a smaller, connected townhouse for a total of around $75 million.

 

That was part of an extraordinary sell-off that included art, one of his Gulfstream jets and a yacht — part of a strategy to “simplify” his life, Perelman said at the time, all while his business had to react to the pandemic-stricken economy.

 

Read the full story on the New York Post here.

The post Billionaire Ron Perelman Lists $60 Million Home In New York City appeared first on Wealth-X.

Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver {Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver} – English

The post Small Changes Lead To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

A Chipped Counter Leads To A Full-Scale Remodel In Denver

On the home's second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

On the home’s second story, designer Mikhail Dantes created a relaxing spot in the master bedroom to take in views of the lake. A Troscan chair sits beneath a Sam Scott painting purchased at William Havu Gallery. The modern fireplace is from Distinctive Mantels Designs.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room's coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

In the dining room, Dantes took cues from the neighboring living room’s coffered ceiling when adding geometric elements like the hair-on-hide rug and Robert Kelly artwork. A Fuse Lighting chandelier from MOD Design lights the Anees Furniture & Design chairs and a Chai Ming Studios table.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Bulthaup cabinets with a mix of matte lacquer and dark oak as well as a hand-blown crystal and bronze Jonathan Browning Studios light fixture make the kitchen stand out. A walnut slab inserted in the white quartz topped island provides the dining surface and dictated the location of the Bright Chair Company counter stools.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Leather tiles by Studioart over the fireplace give distinction to the office. Bright Chair Company seating surround a Troscan desk, and the lamp is by Orestes Suarez Lighting. Here and throughout the house the new floors are walnut with a light stain.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

Ann Sacks floor tile and wallcovering by Fromental add interest to the powder room. A Desiron mirror hangs above the vanity and sink with a Gessi faucet. The sconces are by Fuse Lighting.

"This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills," says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

“This is a city suburban-style house designed for a single gentleman, so we went for a more masculine master bedroom with no frills,” says Dantes. The clean lines of the linen Magni Home Collection bed and the simplicity of the lamp by Orestes Suarez Lighting add to this look.

"Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious," says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

“Once we added steel posts to the staircase, the choice of light fixture was obvious,” says Dantes, who chose a Jonathan Browning Studios chandelier fashioned from powder-coated brass tubes. In the stairwell, a Zachariah Rieke painting from William Havu Gallery is a perfect complement.

In interior design, chain reactions are common. It often goes like this: A new sofa makes the old armchairs look a little worn, so they are reupholstered. The fresh seats make the existing rug seem out of place and the old drapes look wrong, so they are both replaced. It’s that type of scenario that designer Mikhail Dantes found himself in when Thomas Madden, a single dad with a young daughter, approached him about furnishing his newly acquired home in Denver’s coveted Wash Park neighborhood. During an early walk-through Thomas nonchalantly indicated a chip in the kitchen counter and asked if it could be replaced. To which Dantes replied that changing the top would probably mean the old sink had to go, and then the cabinets might not look right, and well, you can guess what happened next. “From that one little chip we moved into a whole house remodel and before we knew it we were taking the interior down to the studs,” says Dantes.

“The house had great bones, but I really wanted something more modern,” says Thomas, who was drawn to Dantes’ knack for making neutral palettes inviting and minimalist interiors both elegant and livable. Along with those attributes the designer’s take-no-prisoners approach to any form of excess has become an accepted part of his signature style. “No case, no base, no trim,” Dantes says about refreshing this home. “We recreated the architecture inside by stripping down superfluous decoration.”

Putting the initial “furnishings only” request on hold the designer first tackled the more pressing issues of reassigning rooms and eliminating any references to the home’s Tuscan ambience–distressed cabinets and faux plaster walls in mottled shades of red, taupe and blue topping the casualty list. In short order the master bathroom and closet were reorganized to create more storage space, three cramped upper-level guest rooms were merged into two larger spaces, and all evidence of faux stone mantles, columns and other Italian accents vanished.

Paramount to the reinvention was a thoughtful layering of new materials starting with lightly stained walnut floors, and walls coated in Dantes go-to Benjamin Moore shade of Super White. In the living room, the monolithic limestone-wrapped fireplace with suede padded tiles above the mantel would normally be the sole statement piece, but in the open layout the kitchen’s mix of lacquer and dark oak cabinets also draws you in. Add to that the ceiling, where large collaged pieces of lacquered tea paper line the spaces between the coffers, causing all eyes gazing up. “I wanted to add a pattern that was more organic to contrast with all the clean lines,” Dantes says. “And when you’re lying on the sofa it’s nice to look up and see something wonderful.”

Still Dantes insists it is not any one thing that stands out in the great room but rather the amalgamation that makes it successful. “There’s a lot going on, but the trick was how to make all those elements blend in a peaceful cohesive way,” says the designer, who also added nubby linen upholstery on the sofa and a hand-knotted wool rug on the floor as textural interjections. “The quietness and subtlety of the palette makes it possible to layer many things without any one thing being in your face.”

Throughout, there are geometry lessons. In the dining room, for example, the console table’s metal frame mimics the linear pattern of the hide-on-hair rug, with the blocks and lines on the wall art providing the perfect complement. “I took my cues from the grid pattern created by the coffered ceiling in the living room,” Dantes says. In the lower-level media room stripes and cubes depicted in the artwork reinforce the pattern subtheme in the rug and in the dramatic fireplace with book-matched marble.

In the master bedroom, a wooly sheepskin rug and suede wallcovering soften the tone-on-tone space, but the latter required a little convincing. “There was this over-the-top gold accent wall I saw that I thought would be perfect,” the homeowner shares. “But Mikhail nicely suggested that I might get tired of it and gently steered me toward the suede instead, which I really love.”

Steering his clients in the direction of longevity is another part of Dantes enduring design philosophy. “My approach with every client is the same,” he says. “No tricks or gimmicks–and whatever the style, it’s about beautiful pieces mixed together to create beautiful rooms.”

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