A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

The post A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Those are just two of the many thoughtfully considered details that followed–but before there was a stove, cabinets or colors, there was just a 2-acre property containing a thicket of old trees and an unremarkable house. “You couldn’t even walk in the backyard,” recalls landscape designer Andrea Kovol who, with landscape architect Ron Lutsko Jr., eliminated all the invasive species and planted new trees along the perimeter of the property to both define and screen the plot.

That south-facing clearing became the anchor for a sprawling family home where the owners hoped to escape the strife of city living. “We left San Francisco for better weather and a yard,” says the wife, who had grown weary of driving around the city searching for a park where her three young offspring could play. “We were building a ground-up house and other than big windows and lots of light, we really didn’t know what we wanted.”

Early conversations with architect Richard Beard revealed otherwise. “They didn’t want anything overtly traditional, but definitely not aggressively modern either,” says Beard. “Incorporating family was essential.” He honored those wishes with a large dwelling that reads as a series of intersecting structures built with stone, cedar and dark steel and surrounded by a number of outdoor spaces for living and play. The home, built by general contractor Bryan Murphy, is new, but the assemblage of contrasting materials implies a sense of age, modernity and originality.

Hohla, in concert with designer Alana Dorn, embraced that balance of old and new in the interiors. This is the third project Hohla worked on for this family, so she was familiar with their previous residences, including the one before this, which featured traditional rooms outfitted with French, Italian and English antiques. But in this case, the designer thought the new home should not be a case of history repeating itself. “I have been dreaming about this house for this family for a long time. From the beginning, we determined that it should have more of a clean-lined and edited feel,” she says. “We wanted to incorporate some of the antiques, but in a more modern way.”

That line of thinking gives rise to the amenable mingling in the living room of a tailored sofa with a gently curving back and a pair of more ornate antique side tables (one adorned with an elaborate mother-of-pearl inlay, and the other with gilded accents). The classic, wingback style of a pair of vintage Paul Frankl seats and Holly Hunt armchairs play against the striking lines of custom-designed coffee tables with aged-brass bases and natural stone tops. And, while an heirloom duet of curling Pierre Cardin table lamps adds a flourish to the room, it’s a brass chandelier reminiscent of a cascade of bangle bracelets that brings the drama while dangling from the 14-foot-high ceiling. “I’m obsessed with light fixtures,” Hohla says. “They are the jewelry of a room and the first thing your eye goes to.” The stylish mix is one of the features that makes this the wife’s favorite room in the house.

In addition to the layering of old and new, Hohla went the extra mile when combining textures and lines. “I come from a family of engineers and I lay things out in a very planned way,” she explains. In the master bedroom, where Hohla wanted a serene and ethereal environment, she commissioned decorative artist Willem Racké to create lacquer walls with a subtle strié pattern done in soft colors. This is a counterpoint to tailored elements such as the custom bed, settee and embroidered ottoman and the bolder Ralph Pucci lounge chairs, Hervé Van der Straeten bronze light fixture and the contemporary painting. As in the rest of the house, vintage alabaster lamps and demilune nightstands add traditional touches in the new structure.

Unifying classic and contemporary elements was an aesthetic the designer carefully negotiated and considered. “The homeowners’ main concern was always about going too modern and mine was about staying too traditional,” Hohla shares. “I wanted them to have an updated home that feels timeless and that they can grow in–I think we were able to strike the perfect balance.”

The post A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

The post Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It wasn’t interior designer Suzanne Childress’ preservation chops that landed her a job updating an 1890s bungalow in Ashland, Oregon—rather, it was her love of wallpaper. Her clients, San Francisco-based Kirsten Ziegler and her husband, J Frederick, had bought it as a second home a decade earlier and decided it was time to renovate. They were finalizing plans with general contractor Brad Youngs, of Brad Youngs Construction, when Kirsten saw a project that Childress had done. “I was searching online for ‘cool, modern wallpaper,’ and there was an image of a design by Suzanne that grabbed me,” she recalls.

Childress did more than select an assortment of dramatic wallpapers for the project, though. She proposed a series of structural changes that made the 1,000-square-foot house at once functional and inviting—from moving walls and reconfiguring rooms to outfitting the spaces with creative storage solutions. “I love old houses,” says Childress, who once worked as an attorney with the Environmental Protection Agency. Her side gig—redoing her historic home in Annapolis, Maryland—set the stage for a major career shift and an eventual move west. “If a house has quality bones, then I’m all about working them into a new design concept,” she says. “But this house was a real patchwork; there wasn’t anything worth preserving.”

Kirsten and J, who both work in the tech world, embraced her suggestions. “We were so enamored with the home’s location—we’re a block from the theater complex and can walk to downtown,” says Kirsten. “It certainly wasn’t because the house was so gigantic or because the interior was so darling.”

That meant a gut renovation and installing all new floors, windows and moldings. Childress tweaked the plans to transform what had been envisioned as a semi open-plan kitchen into a more traditional space. She also worked with Youngs, who has since retired, and his team to bump out a wall to include a small eating area. What the house lacked in size, it made up for in vertical space, so Childress capitalized on the high ceilings, tucking base and top cabinets everywhere she could. What was once a second bedroom became a cozy parlor featuring a two-sided fireplace that opens to the adjacent living room. Childress was also able to carve out two additional spaces for the couple: a tiny study and a nook that holds a sofa and a TV.

Finding a balance between old and new was her goal. “Kirsten and J were worried when I suggested dropping in more doorways,” says Childress, “but the spaces would have been too busy had we left them open. Now the rooms unfold as you walk through them.”

Taking a cue from what Childress calls “the rock-and-roll edge to Kirsten’s style,” the designer incorporated deep tones to dramatic effect. She set off the gray-painted walls in the living room and part of the kitchen with black moldings and window frames. In the parlor, she paired black gloss paint with a similarly hued imitation crocodile wallcovering for an atmospheric air, accented by touches of gold and brass in the furnishings and hardware. Finished in black paint with brown undertones, the kitchen cabinetry creates a striking foil to the marble-like porcelain counter and backsplash as well as the upper cabinets stained a rich brown. “It took a lot of rounds to get the stain right, but it plays so nicely with the tones of the brass and black,” Childress notes. “Brad had the knowledge and expertise to make it happen.”

Considering the diverse wallcoverings that Childress selected, Kirsten and J are hard-pressed to name a favorite. J leans toward the woodland animal paper in the study, while Kirsten says that though she was initially unsure about the enchanted-forest-themed print in the master bedroom—appropriately called Midsummer Night—she now loves it. “I wondered if I was going to hate it in six months because it’s so different, but J really liked it,” she says. “We looked at other ones, but I said, ‘Let’s just do it,’ and I’m so glad we did. It’s really sultry and ethereal with the lights on.”

Childress believes the fact that the couple lived in the house before they started renovating is key to the project’s success. “It’s nice if you can get the idea of the flow and what’s working and what’s not. I’m always curious when a client says, ‘Oh, we never go in there’ or ‘We never use that.’ Most of us can’t afford to have rooms you never go in,” she says. “You need to make the most of all your spaces. That was what I wanted to do here—to make all the rooms spaces they really wanted to be in and enjoy.”

The post Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again {A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again} – English

A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again {A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again} – English

The post A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The transformation of the Atherton, California, home — which originally featured yellow shingles, poor geometry and a rather neglected garden — can be attributed to Linsteadt’s architectural prowess, designer Marie Turner Carson’s sensitive handling of the furnishings and the tasteful fixed finish selection of designers Carol Knorpp and Kerry Bogardus.

“We took the narrative of the clients, who liked cleaner, more contemporary things,” says Carson. “They wanted to feel like they were in this stately home, but with fresh and current interiors.”

Home builder Ed Faubel’s paneling work helped bring the interior setting together, and landscape designer Janell Denler Hobart expanded the original gardens while adding to their natural beauty. The project is pulled together by a long, windowed breezeway, one of Linsteadt’s favorite parts of the new house.

The post A Turn-Of-The-Century Home Flourishes Once Again appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

There are many reasons to update a home: to make it more current, to expand, or simply to change things up.

All of the above applied for the owners of an Aspen house, but the couple also found another, far more unique reason to invest in a big renovation: uninvited bears.

“They came in through the screens before we had air conditioning,” the wife explains, noting that one giant even feasted on leftover birthday cake.

In addition to adding A/C, interior designer Maria Bordelon and architect Gretchen Greenwood took the home in a more modern direction by installing metal-frame windows, incorporating textural furnishings and introducing unique accents, such as a console table with a glossy automotive finish and beaten copper wall panels.

“We used metals throughout the house but very judiciously to provide a little relief from the heavier materials,” Bordelon explains, noting the result is a far cry from the look the dwelling sported in the 1993 cult film Aspen Extreme when it had a swimming pool in the basement and a rather dated sunken conversation pit. “Everywhere the owners look, something is beautiful, and they enjoy that as their daily environment.”

The post An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

When it came down to the transformation of his 1,800-square-foot co-op, advertising executive Bob Jeffrey tapped architect Luca Andrisani to take on the task.

In addition to sharing a passion for Italy, the two bonded over a love of modern design, Italian movies and the joys of storytelling.

“It’s hard for me to design without meaning, to just make something pretty,” says Andrisani.

The almost obsessive details in one particular movie, “I Am Love,” set in Milan’s 1930s-built Villa Nechhi, raised the design bar.

To update the interiors of the apartment, builder Chip Brian gutted two bathrooms, expanded the kitchen and reconfigured the powder room. He also created a new pass-through room that houses the client’s collection of John F. Kennedy memorabilia.

Artisans at Atelier Viollet created luxurious wall surfaces with cane, goatskin (parchment) and straw marquetry. Macassar ebony and rift sawn whitewashed oak also provide rich backdrops for the furnishings — mostly a mix of midcentury Italian, punctuated with lush cashmeres, mohair velvets and silks.

“I always worked with very strong creative people,” says Bob. “Luca raised the bar for interior design. For me, aesthetics are key. And this place is a work of art.”

The post A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

In the cooler autumn months, Matt and Paige Shoberg and their young sons enjoy the open and airy space overlooking the swimming pool and spa behind their home in West Lake Hills, Texas. Furman + Keil Architects completely reimagined the residence with a new plaster skin and two new additions. “It’s so peaceful,” explains the busy mother. “I don’t get a lot of peace.”

The original abode’s traditional red brick gave way to thick plaster, with its multiple gables and adornments eliminated in favor of streamlined standing seam metal detail running underneath the roofline. A steel and glass bridge, which houses the dining room, passes over a dip in the land, connecting the existing structure to one of the home’s two new wings.

While Matt, a home builder, executed the architects’ vision for the new additions and completely reconfigured the interior, Paige worked with interior designer Wendy Williamson to select finishes and furnishings.

“With almost every selection on this house, we asked, ‘Have we seen it before?’ And if the answer was ‘yes,’ we didn’t want to do it,” Paige explains, pointing to the black slate flooring and bespoke light fixtures throughout. “We love it here.”

The post A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life {A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life} – English

A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life {A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life} – English

Intent on restoring the character of a Willis Polk house overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge, a San Francisco couple hired a design team to help refresh the space and modify past renovations that left the rooms in their 1915 residence feeling a bit disjointed.

“I’m a huge fan of consistency,” says the wife. “I’d rather have consistency of materials and finishes instead of making each room unique. It’s more soothing.”

To keep the top and ground floors in sync with the home’s original vibes, James Hunter and Shannon Jue, from the Wiseman Group Interior Design, reconfigured the spaces, reintroduced traditional millwork and worked in classic, yet modern, furniture silhouettes.

The designers also lightened up that palette of the house, particularly in the entry hall, which previously felt brooding with its mahogany-stained gumwood paneling. The wood was stripped, bleached and touched up to make it “perfectly imperfect,” says Jue.

In the end, the homeowners were left with a cohesive look befitting both their casual lifestyle and the home’s historic roots.

The post A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Has Billionaire Row in New York Lost Its Luster? {Has Billionaire Row in New York Lost Its Luster?} – English

Has New York’s Billionaire Row Lost Its Luster? {Has New York’s Billionaire Row Lost Its Luster?} – English

Billionaire Row, a collection of ultra-luxury skyscrapers along the southern end of Manhattan’s Central Park, is home to one of the highest concentrations of wealth in the world. Known as a Monopoly board for the uber-affluent, these buildings are the type of real estate where sales make national headlines.

In January of this year, a penthouse at 220 Central Park South broke the record for the most expensive home ever sold in the U.S., going for $238 million. That displaced a penthouse at the neighboring One57 Tower, which sold for $100 million in 2014 and had held the title as the most expensive home in New York.

These premier developments include the kind of flourishes one might expect: wall-to-ceiling glass walls, bespoke finishes, al fresco patios and amenities to suit the most discerning buyers. And with more than $4 billion in new construction coming online, two new buildings will add to New York’s luxury inventory.

However, some market experts speculate whether the appetite for this glamorous neighborhood may be dwindling. New York City’s luxury real estate prices have fallen 10 percent over the past two years, which could be pressured down further by a mansion tax set to be introduced in July. That, coupled with a glut of local inventory and “micro-market” factors, could erase some of Billionaire Row’s appeal, according to these analysts.

“From my perspective, I do not believe Billionaires’ Row would make for a good investment,” Monica Weinberg of the Terrace Tower Group tells Business Insider. The Australian-based group focuses on $2 – $15 million investments. “My personal preference is for Noho, West Village, Tribeca, and Chelsea.”

There is evidence to support that the Billionaire Row towers may be losing some of their luster. Over 40 percent of units in the eight luxury buildings that have recently been completed or are scheduled to be finished in the next several years remain unsold, Curbed reported this spring. Some have been on the market for years.

Some experts also read Amazon founder Jeff Bezo’s $80 million acquisition of a property on Fifth Avenue near Madison Square Park, further downtown from Central Park, as a sign that investors may be looking elsewhere.

“This is a great value for a marquee luxury building,” Martin Eiden of Compass says of Bezo’s purchase. “It’s less than half the square foot price of penthouses on the towers on Billionaires’ Row.”

Properties along Billionaire Row have also been dogged by tensions over a proposal to install a homeless shelter nearby. Mayor Bill de Blasio recently unveiled plans to convert the former Park Savoy Hotel into a shelter as part of the city’s “Turn the Tide” campaign. The move sparked pushback—although many owners disagree that the project poses a socio-economic conflict.

All facts considered, it’s hard to imagine that the bottom will drop out from under Billionaire Row any time soon. The buildings’ developers have protections in place to bolster prices, and the modern luxuries and enviable locations afford by these towers are the kind to attract discerning, far-sighted buyers.