A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home {A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home} – English

A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home {A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home} – English

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But upon closer inspection, this 21st-century dwelling could be considered the architectural equivalent of an undercover agent, an operative of contemporary design infiltrating an esteemed neighbor- hood of historically preserved abodes: The embellished exterior that blends harmoniously into its surroundings also serves as a guise for its minimalist agenda. “Since the original home was historically significant, the city required that the new construction represent the same architectural style,” explains architect Kiko Franco. “The challenge was to incorporate the homeowner’s modern tastes.”

Arguably, the new dwelling’s simple street presence is a contemporary take on the traditional Mediterranean form. The rear exterior strikes a more classical tone with curved openings and a clear visual of the multiple gabled roofs laid with terra-cotta tiles imported from Bogota´, Colombia. However, the vast windows and glass railings that supply generous water views are elements of the indoor-outdoor rubric that defines modern design. “The house really captures and respects the South Florida landscape,” says Franco’s associate and project architect Jon Bonita, who is also referring to the region’s proclivity for tempestuous weather.

That said, part of the home’s modernity is owed to its innovative armor made of tough load-bearing masonry, muscular engineered-wood trusses and substantial hurricane-grade glass. The latter is especially paramount considering the home’s architectural apex, a decidedly un-Mediterranean 15-foot glass pyramid that crowns the living room. “At the time, it was the largest allowable skylight that met the hurricane-impact standards for South Florida,” explains Bonita. “It’s a unique piece that makes a spectacular statement.”

This sparkling zenith appropriately sheds light on the focal point of the interiors, a double-height living room that exhibits another aspect of modernism: symmetry. Identical suede-upholstered Christian Liaigre Brannan sofas flank the room’s main event—a soaring fireplace faced with textured limestone and rich sapele wood panels. The simple arrangement is an elegant iteration of the homeowner’s desire to keep the interiors minimal. By design, furnishings with sleek profiles don’t detract from the home’s true conversation pieces.

“The homeowner didn’t mind the Mediterranean style outside but insisted on a more contemporary South Beach look inside,” says interior designer Louis Shuster, who worked with designer Eric Dyer to realize the project. “We focused on creating subtle details and clean, linear surfaces,” adds Dyer.

The dining room intentionally functions less for feasting than for exhibiting wine. A translucent cellar-like fixture showcases rare vintages, while a lead-crystal dining table seems to dissolve into the sophisticated vignette. This disappearing act simultaneously accentu- ates the clear wine enclosure as it exalts the sepia-tone work from the homeowner’s collection framed within the buffet.

Here, creating a niche to display art is the exception, not the rule. Throughout the house, the collection is mostly exhibited gallery-style on plain walls. The pieces dominate their surroundings, underscoring the value of minimalist accoutrements. However, in the master suite and family room—where furnishings were kept simple, neutral and streamlined—large bare windows expose their own hidden agenda by quietly diverting focus from the attention-getting, water-themed wall hangings to the real aquatic spectacles: an infinity pool and ocean-fed bay glistening in the distance.

This article was originally published in the Summer 2012 Florida issue of Luxe Interiors + Design.

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Soak Up The Boho, Spanish Vibe Of This 1920s Miami Beach Home {Soak Up The Boho, Spanish Vibe Of This 1920s Miami Beach Home} – English

Soak Up The Boho, Spanish Vibe Of This 1920s Miami Beach Home {Soak Up The Boho, Spanish Vibe Of This 1920s Miami Beach Home} – English

The post Soak Up The Boho, Spanish Vibe Of This 1920s Miami Beach Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Oftentimes home buyers favor a residence that has been renovated with a more modern style. But the features that attracted one couple to a 1920s Miami Beach house happened to be original aspects of the Spanish-inspired structure—a notion that excited interior designers Laila Colvin and Rafaela Simoes. “They’re dream clients who let us be free with our ideas,” Simoes says.

The canal-front residence had undergone an extensive overhaul for a cleaner, more contemporary look. But plenty of 100-year-old charm remained, including arched windows, wood-beam ceilings and— the element that won over the couple—the original open staircase, which sports a traditional wrought- iron railing and colorful ceramic tiles. The owners tasked Colvin and Simoes with capturing a sense of artistry and zeal while bridging the gap between the original and renovated architecture. “They wanted the house to be modern but colorful,” Simoes says. “The wife wanted to keep the Spanish character but more contemporary.” The duo devised a concept for an eclectic bohemian vibe that combines organic, natural elements with streamlined ones. And the staircase, they knew, was the key starting point.

Working with general contractor Leonardo Rescaldani, the duo first made the stairs the focus of the living area by covering the surrounding walls throughout with a textural neutral linen. They then pulled the home’s color palette from the staircase’s Spanish tiles, particularly blues and oranges. The living area’s blue-and-white rug, made of dyed Persian rug remnants, for instance, sets a casual yet graphic backdrop for tailored Brazilian-style furnishings in neutral fabrics. “The sofa is very sleek,” Colvin says, pointing to the off-white track-arm sofa, “but the distressed patchwork rug feels bohemian.” Ottomans and pillows in a sun- bleached orange-red add another boho layer while picking up a second hue from the stairs.

A navy grass cloth covers the wall behind the open shelving in the living area’s custom built-in walnut cabinetry, which has a vertical slatted sliding panel that conceals the television when not in use. “The slatted panel is our signature,” Colvin says, noting she and Simoes incorporated a similar screen in their design studio. “We always use it somehow.” The handcrafted walnut millwork complements the wood ceiling beams, which they refinished for a more refined look.

The staircase’s tiles also informed the residence’s artwork, including a deep orange papier-mâché sculpture on a foyer wall and a pair of abstract paintings in the dining area. There, the interior designers played with opposites in materials: A metal chandelier illuminates a glass-topped table with an organic live-edge wood slab base, while white linen host chairs counter Brazilian wood side chairs with leather seats. “We love the mix of polished and organic elements,” Simoes says. “The balance creates a chic vibe.”

The duo repeated that strategy in the family room, pairing wood side tables with a blue plush velvet sofa and ottoman. “The velvet makes it feel a little fancier,” Colvin says, “but the idea is to be cozy.” Above, lining the wall, is a grouping of the family’s favorite movie posters—a similar scene to the breakfast area, which displays photos by a New Orleans artist over a blue channel-tufted banquette. “We wanted to do a gallery that kind of resembled the staircase, so that was a perfect find,” Simoes says.

Not every artwork is vibrant, though. Echoing the house’s more organic furnishings, mounted driftwood and wooden wall pieces make appearances throughout. The owners fell in love with a wood sculpture Colvin and Simoes placed by a swivel lounge chair in a corner of the primary bedroom. The room’s white linen bed juxtaposes the existing dark wood millwork, which flows into the en-suite bathroom. That space underwent a renovation that involved rearranging the layout to place a freestanding tub in front of a window and install an onyx-like wall. “The floor and most of the walls are concrete tile, so we created a porcelain slab accent wall with veining to break it up,” Colvin says. Overhead, a ceiling window with a sky view casts light on the spa-like milieu.

Just as the home’s original staircase leads to the structure’s next level, the residence itself has taken a step into a colorful new chapter with its history restored in a comforting way. “It was important to have a house that was beautiful, exciting and fun,” Colvin says. “It wasn’t to show off. It’s to enjoy, relax and have fun.”

This Peaceful Beach Home Is Even More Loved The Second Time Around {This Peaceful Beach Home Is Even More Loved The Second Time Around} – English

This Peaceful Beach Home Is Even More Loved The Second Time Around {This Peaceful Beach Home Is Even More Loved The Second Time Around} – English

The post This Peaceful Beach Home Is Even More Loved The Second Time Around appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The structure was a replica of a nearby home Cudmore had built for another couple in 1991. “Those owners wanted the exact same house but with a bigger pool,” he recalls of the original residence. “So I built the identical house—same tiles, cabinets, color, everything—just with a slightly different layout for the garages and a larger pool.”

Although the new residents loved the footprint of the original Mediterranean-style home, they wanted a more modern, cleaner style that maximized the ocean views. So Cudmore and architect Rustem Kupi stripped the structure down to its studs, creating a more Anglo-Caribbean appearance with a cedar shake roof and outriggers as well as wood window and door frames.

Inside, they moved the elevator and added windows in the informal dining and family areas to open up the rear of the residence and ensure the flow of natural light. To accommodate the family’s lifestyle, they converted the library into a home theater and the office into a guest suite, replaced the terrace off the main bedroom and covered in the double-height ceiling in the entryway to create an extra bedroom.

“We wanted it to be sleek, clean and peaceful—very white, earthy tones,” the wife says. “The goal was to give it a more elegant and sophisticated look in some parts of the house, without being stuffy. I wanted people to be able to come in from the beach and feel comfortable, not cold.”

With that in mind, interior designer James Woodrow Taylor made sure the decor embodied simple, modern elegance. Light, natural tones—off-whites, neutrals, grays—as well as warm wood and leather textures bring a cozy intimacy to the lofty space. In the vaulted living area at the home’s heart, he positioned a wide, low-back sectional that provides the perfect perch for ocean views. “It’s low-key, nothing in excess,” Taylor says. “We used no more furniture than we needed to accommodate a normal amount of people.”

Kupi also created custom wood paneling and millwork as well as a minimalist, geometric railing around the mezzanine to help bring down the scale of the living area and allow the natural light to stream through. “The owners wanted to keep the home light and airy,” he says. “Even though there’s quite a bit of casings and moldings, it’s very simple and clean.”

That’s not to say there aren’t surprising irreverent moments amid the serenity. A trio of surfboards on a living area wall elevates the nautical, beach aesthetic, while sculptural light fixtures anchor many rooms, adding bursts of texture and intrigue to the otherwise minimal space. The backyard is just as restrained, featuring a large pool and a spacious lawn where the children can play, all prefaced by the Atlantic Ocean. “I wanted the inside of the house to have a less-is-more kind of feeling, and the backyard is a continuation of that,” the wife says. Around the perimeter, landscape architect Dave Bodker installed plants such as clusia, seagrape, thatch palms, mangosteen, green island ficus and sun rose. “We wanted to preserve the ocean view,” he says. And to ensure privacy from the adjacent neighbors, he added high, dense, multi-trunk palms that also provide a lush, tropical backdrop.

Although Cudmore has many great memories of the original residence, he’s satisfied with its newest incarnation. “It’s even better now than it was,” he says. “Rusty thought of every little detail. It was a good house then, and it’s still a good house.”

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Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla {Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla} – English

Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla {Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla} – English

The post Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The couple purchased this property for its commanding sight lines to the Pacific, teaming with architect Drexel Patterson to start anew. The goal was to create a calming one-story sanctuary that emphasized indoor-outdoor living. Naturally, simplicity ruled their design decisions. They chose a single floor finish, two types of wood for the millwork and a sole paint color for the entire house. “It’s very mellow,” notes general contractor Thomas Waters, who worked with his associate Seth Silano on the project. Here, even the traditional take on a front door has been rethought. Visitors are buzzed through an exterior gate and then slide open a glass panel to enter the home.

Such restraint in the materials and palette led Patterson and project architect Haley Duke to exercise great care as he selected tones, finishes and textures. “When you have a space this simple, you have to ask, ‘How can I strike a balance with texture, materials and warmth?’ ” he says. For him, that meant paying strict attention to the interplay of wood, stone and stucco to make certain that the overall effect was soothing, not sleepy.

Patterson’s geometric floor plan nods to the trademarks of classic Modernist architecture. It’s voluminous and open, with a clean composition that accentuates the materials used and the home’s relationship with the landscape. The house unfolds with four sequential elements between the street and the view to the ocean: the street frontage to the entry courtyard wall; the entry courtyard to the interior pavilion; and the rear courtyard open to the long view across the golf course. “Each of these elements has a sense of scale and containment, even though that containment is complete in each space,” explains Patterson. “The mind makes up for what is not shown visually, so a suggestion is often enough.”

A structural double-column timber framework defines the great room, frames the views and adds a necessary touch of texture. “This was the most minimal aspect that could be added to hold everything together in a visual, sensual way,” Patterson says. “The room would be a little duller without it. The cadence of the posts organizes the room visually and furniture-wise. The gray lines tie across the whole volume and accentuate it. I consider the posts and beams as a vital catalyst to the visual experience.”

Outdoor spaces are just as thoughtfully conceived. The aforementioned entry courtyard includes a fireplace and is now a favorite cocktail spot for the owners. Off the main bedroom is a raised spa and garden, while two guest bedrooms and a study flank a private side yard. Most dramatically, though, a steel pergola extends from the main living space’s ceiling to the back patio, pointing the way to the main outdoor entertaining area. “It’s an important element, as some sort of framework was necessary to make the transition from inside gracious and natural,” says Patterson. Like the exposed beams inside, it suggests a defined space while drawing the eye up and out. Beside it, a series of drought-tolerant coastal Mediterranean plants line organically placed pavers and gravel. “The whole space has the look of a deconstructed grid,” says landscape architect Greg Hebert.

The homeowners themselves outfitted the residence, consulting with designer Pamela Smith of Pamela Smith Interiors as needed. Among the highlights are a stunning use of live-edge walnut slabs for their formal dining table, breakfast bar, and bedroom headboard, plush rugs that markedly contrast the polished concrete floors, plus classic and custom furnishings. “It’s Zen, calming,” says the wife. And is it too monotone, after all? Definitely not.

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Soak In The Sunlit Interiors At This Beachfront Florida Home {Soak In The Sunlit Interiors At This Beachfront Florida Home} – English

Soak In The Sunlit Interiors At This Beachfront Florida Home {Soak In The Sunlit Interiors At This Beachfront Florida Home} – English

The post Soak In The Sunlit Interiors At This Beachfront Florida Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


So enticing was the prospect of waking up each day to the sight of the sand and waves that the couple decided to find a beachfront property and start again. When they did, they put together a dream design team: architect John Cooney and the couple’s longtime designer Bruce Palmer Coon, who together created a residence that satisfies the owners’ desire for an elegant and comfortable coastal abode that embraces the site’s views in every possible way—and fits right into its beachy environs without falling into seaside design tropes.

“[The owner] likes the West Indies-inspired, clean, tropical style,” Cooney says, “and he wanted me to get as many rooms on the view as possible.” The architect dreamed up a three-story concept with authentic detailing and materials: On the exterior, Cooney specified tabby shell stucco, mahogany windows and doors, and large overhangs with tongue-and-groove soffits and outrigger brackets and corbels. Even the gutters and downspouts—zinc-coated copper—align with the home’s distinctive style. Cooney prioritized the use of windows and sliding-glass doors; using as much glass as possible on the north and west elevations allows for ample views of the water and floods the interiors with natural light.

That sunlight illuminates exquisitely detailed interiors. The front door is at mezzanine level, splitting the difference between the exterior grade and the first habitable floor, and opens to a dramatic three-story-height entry. Coon designed a pair of handblown, Murano glass “sea bubble” chandeliers, one of which extends from the second-floor ceiling to the first floor, while the second fixture extends 31 feet through all three levels of the space. “We did countless drawings to ensure the space would be sufficient for what is, essentially, an art installation,” Coon says. “And we had to be sure the grandkids wouldn’t swing off of it,” he laughs.

The owners asked for main-floor living so they could reserve the second floor for those grandchildren and their parents, as well as a plan that fosters entertaining. Among the ways the design team delivered: the glowing dining room with a gorgeous pecky cypress ceiling treatment. “I’ve always loved pecky cypress, probably because it reminds me of Addison Mizner’s houses in Palm Beach. It’s very ‘old Florida,’ ” Coon says. To accommodate the HVAC grills and preserve the integrity of the ceiling’s design, Cooney worked with the mechanical engineer to create a hidden reveal—which appears as a shadow line in the ceiling details—behind which the ductwork resides. The room’s other elements, including gold-threaded grass cloth on the walls, sheer ombré curtains and a smoked-glass mirror, give the room an inviting feel.

This level of detail is omnipresent throughout. “The wood-clad walls, the millwork, the columns—it required a very high level of craftsmanship,” says builder Dave Rogers. His team, led by project supervisor Andy Warner, oversaw the installation of the architectural paneling and millwork that Coon specified throughout the home. In the living room, for example, paneled walls make a handsome backdrop for the coquina-limestone fireplace, and a silk Phillip Jeffries wallcovering defines the ceiling’s coffers. Even the powder room exudes elegance: Venetian-plaster wallpaper panels with a polished nickel trim complement a single-slab marble floor.

The interior beauty is matched, of course, only by its site on the Gulf. Cooney designed expansive outdoor, west-facing living spaces on each level, which provide privacy from beach-goers and protection from the afternoon sun. Landscape architect Koby Kirwin nestled the pool below the dune so the owners “have unobstructed views of the water breaking on the shore,” he says, “and the pool is protected from the winter winds off the Gulf.” To landscape the property, he used a small plant palette inspired by the site’s coastal setback, including native sea grape and clusia, railroad vine and coastal grasses; a wall of Sylvester palms and hedging gives some privacy from the public beach access. “The owners invested in the view and in a home that embraces it,” he says. “We all just wanted to give them a place that they never want to leave.”

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Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat {Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat} – English

Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat {Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat} – English

The post Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Designer Kara Hebert, who led the project, spent her childhood in Jupiter riding her bicycle to the beach and taking family boating trips to the Bahamas–idyllic experiences that have “influenced my work and my lifestyle,” she says. Her latest endeavor is no exception: Hebert incorporated variations of soft blue throughout every room, creating a soothing atmosphere in the home by residential designer Dennis Rainho and general contractor Michael Maxwell. To ensure the pervasive primary color is subdued yet engaging, she incorporated shades of white and gray, introduced prints and presented varying hues and textures. The result is a seamless, calming getaway.

The residence’s restful tone is established in the entry courtesy of an abstract ocean watercolor, pale blue lamps and a chandelier made of white shells. From there, the great room takes over as the wide-open heart of the home, encompassing the kitchen, living area and dining area as well as leading to a family room and patio. Comfortable seating includes an approachable white sofa and four light blue chairs, two of which swivel–so during gatherings, occupants can turn toward any conversation. “Strong furniture and art placement in the great room were crucial,” Hebert says. “The space has a high ceiling and an abundance of natural light from windows and glass doors, a signature of Maxwell homes.” Clear handblown glass pendants allow unobstructed views from the living area to the kitchen’s focal shiplap wall, with the family room and patio on the right side and a stunning marble-walled laundry room on the left. “This sight line is my favorite view and probably the most interesting in the house,” the designer says. “It shows a layered effect, which is so important when using a singular color palette.”

To create more visual interest, Hebert selected a subtle patterned fabric for the living area’s swivel chairs and topped the sofa with throw pillows that add pops of blues and grays. For texture, she maintained wood as the main material for various tables, including round washed-mango-wood end tables, a square gray washed-wood coffee table and, in the dining area, a solid wood table surrounded by slate-colored upholstered chairs. “Because you can see into almost every space from the great room, I wanted a visual treat everywhere you looked,” Hebert says. Wooden elements reappear in the family room, where a lattice-back chair and a round drum coffee table retain the coastal vibe. Here, darker gray walls and a powder-blue linen sectional add to the cozy feel for movie nights and lounging. “This is the owners’ favorite room in the house,” Hebert says.

While much of the home gives a nod to the ocean, the master bedroom, where the wife requested a “cloud-like” feel, points toward the sky. Hebert combined a white custom rug, white linen draperies trimmed in seafoam and a comfy bed upholstered in the same powder-blue fabric as a nearby chaise. White linen bedside chests further soften the room, as do the cotton-sateen linens the designer acquired to outfit each bed in the house. The pampering continues in the spa-like master bathroom, where pale sky linen draperies frame a soaking tub. A dramatic wood bead chandelier and walls lined in horizontal shiplap reintroduce the beachy presence.

The restful spaces are more than what they seem: To stand up to the owners’ rescue dogs and visiting family members, Hebert incorporated performance materials throughout the home–notably Crypton fabrics on nearly all the upholstered pieces, including the living area sofa, the family room sectional, the dining chairs and even the master bedroom headboard and chaise. All of the countertops are engineered quartz, known for its durability. And there is not a carpet to be found: Rather, indoor-outdoor area rugs and durable tile that mimics wood provide proper footing for scampering feet. “I wouldn’t want to design a house that will stress someone out,” Hebert says. “I always tell my clients, I want their home to reflect their family and the way they live.”

It’s safe to say Hebert hit her mark: According to the wife, guests say their blood pressure drops in the peaceful environment. “So much of the gratification I get out of my job is making sure clients are comfortable in their home,” the designer says. “To me, that’s the best result.”

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Traditional Meets Whimsical In This Stately Florida Home {Traditional Meets Whimsical In This Stately Florida Home} – English

Traditional Meets Whimsical In This Stately Florida Home {Traditional Meets Whimsical In This Stately Florida Home} – English

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A waterfront lot bordering two bird sanctuaries offered the ideal setting for Wietsma and general contractor William Lippolis to create a house inspired by the islands. Reflecting a British West Indies style, also known as Anglo-Caribbean, the two-level structure is flanked by one-story wings, embellished with shutters and balconies, and rendered in a soft pastel palette. “The exterior’s primary yellow color appears to be slightly sun-bleached,” Wietsma observes. “And the green shutters are powder-coated aluminum with a matte finish to give an illusion of painted wood.” But its outward appearance isn’t purely for aesthetics. “Anglo-Caribbean buildings are designed for the harsh tropical climate, with eaves and hipped roofs able to repel rain and wind,” Wietsma says. “The details tend to be more ‘shipwright’ than ornamental.” And stone, stucco, concrete roof tiles and aluminum casement windows treated with salt-resistant Kynar paint are just a few of the durable materials showcased on the home.

The tropical touches become apparent as visitors approach the property. They are welcomed by a gate Wietsma had fashioned after one he had admired in Bermuda. A brick driveway with a cut-coral border then leads to a graceful circular turnaround. “We used two different species of date palm to give the property a grand entrance,” says landscape architect Joe Peterson. “It’s a formal design with three tiers of plantings across the front. There’s lots of color at two levels, while the plants set against the house are dark green to contrast with the yellow exterior.”

Lively hues from outdoors flow inside, where interior designer Ellen Kavanaugh made a splashy statement in the foyer, pairing lime-green-striped wallpaper with black-and-white tile flooring. “The homeowners wanted an interior that has kind of a resort feel,” she says. “It’s very colorful–when you walk in, it feels like you’re on vacation.” The foyer opens to the living room, where Wietsma and Lippolis incorporated more hallmarks of Caribbean architecture such as mahogany flooring, a cypress ceiling and a grand window that offers views of the water and the verdant landscaping. Kavanaugh continued the theme by introducing elements that coincide with the style. “We wanted to select furniture commonly found in the beautiful old British West Indies homes in the islands,” she says. “A lot of the pieces are dark mahogany or teak. Then, we mixed in fabrics that are very tropical and colorful.” The sunny elegance that pervades the house is evident in the living room, where the classical white fireplace and teak furnishings combine with yellow damask wallpaper and floral-print seating.

The adjoining dining room also boasts water views as well as access to the home’s loggia. Kavanaugh animated the surroundings with green patterned draperies and a chandelier decorated with a gilded-leaf motif. The nearby kitchen offsets the home’s dark flooring with white painted cabinets and brushed Calacatta marble countertops, while the office is a study in mahogany enlivened by green botanical-print draperies and a pair of cozy armchairs. “It’s formal, but it’s also inviting and it’s very comfortable,” the interior designer says of the room.

In addition to satisfying the owners’ desire for interesting architecture, Wietsma and Lippolis devised a layout to suit the couple’s lifestyle. “They have four grown children and wanted a house that would accommodate them at holidays but also be intimate when no guests are there,” the architect says. “We ended up putting all of the guest suites upstairs and the master downstairs. This way, the house works as a one-bedroom when the owners are alone and gives everyone privacy when the house is full.” Sunny and airy, with a high ceiling and ivory tones, the private main sleeping quarters provide a tranquil oasis. Facing the Intracoastal, the room’s curved sitting area holds a loveseat, an ottoman and a pair of upholstered chairs, offering another spot to relax and unwind.

“The amount of detail that went into this project is what sets it apart,” Lippolis says. “Every tile layout, trim carpentry and cabinet was perfect.” For clients in the spice trade who longed for Caribbean bliss, it was the recipe for success.

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The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life {The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life} – English

The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life {The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life} – English

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If you’re looking to rejuvenate in the new year—and who isn’t?—head to wellness mecca Amrit Ocean Resort & Residences on Palm Beach’s swoon-worthy Singer Island. Set to open in March, Amrit spans more than seven beachfront acres and offers a mix of residences and resort guest rooms between two sleek towers aptly named Peace and Happiness.

A stone moon gate flanked by urns overflowing with water and illuminated by fire makes for a dramatic entry to the property, while inside textured patterns inspired by sand dollars, sea urchins and driftwood reflect the feel and colors of the ocean. “A key feature of the lobby is the spiral grand staircase inspired by the shape of a seashell,” says Mauricio Salcedo, principal at Bilkey Llinas Design.

Guests and residents can expect cutting-edge, individually customized programming that marries Eastern well-being philosophies with Western technology (think everything from acupuncture to sound and light therapies) while enjoying a sculpture garden, a 40,000-square-foot Ayush hydrothermal therapy experience for alternating between hot and cold pools and a salt chamber, and a plant-centric spa restaurant.

PHOTO COURTESY AMRIT RESORT & RESIDENCES

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Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future {Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future} – English

Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future {Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future} – English

The post Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

From envisaging luxury waterfront private residences on Hibiscus and Palm Islands to shaping Miami’s skyline with projects like the American Airlines Arena, Reinaldo Borges boasts a diverse portfolio in South Florida and the Middle East. His firm, Borges Architects + Associates, is currently celebrating 20 years, its design philosophy driven by tropical modern architecture and a passion for sustainability. Borges often glides over South Florida in an ultralight seaplane, seeking inspiration. borgesarchitects.com

What are you working on? We’re starting on a new Istanbul-based restaurant-lounge concept on the water in Miami, finalizing the Celino Hotel on Ocean Drive, and creating a delivery-only kitchen concept, an important service now with COVID-19. Plus, in Fort Lauderdale, a senior housing high-rise we designed will be the first of its kind in South Florida.

How has the threat of sea-level rise affected what clients are looking for? South Florida is blessed with great exposure to water and that drives a lot of the real estate valuation in our community. At the same time, we are challenged by a future with lots more water. We are designing several waterfront luxury homes with innovative climate-ready strategies to ensure they have resiliency to storms and sea-level rise. It’s a passion of ours to think through the future and design smarter, long-lasting projects.

Looking ahead, share your predictions for 2021. Integrated wellness concepts with sustainability and resiliency design will be big. From trends on how we drain our cities and waterways to reducing our energy footprint, it’s all part of the new normal for architects, planners and those involved with the city and its infrastructure.

PHOTO COURTESY GROSSMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh {An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh} – English

An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh {An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh} – English

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It’s a strategy that proved crucial for her latest project, a French Provencal-inspired estate in Coral Gables that called for an interior design refresh. The client, a world traveler who grew up in Kenya, had developed a taste for the exotic. Boasting authentic French details, the home was originally created by architect Bill Taylor and residential designer Phyllis Taylor.

“The rough textured Florida keystone on the front of the house is similar in color to houses in the south of France,” Bill Taylor points out. Inside, Phyllis Taylor incorporated diverse elements acquired during a trip to Paris, including elaborate replace mantels sourced at a flea market and architectural salvage stored in warehouses. “The antique paneling in the library was a lucky Internet find,” she adds. “And features like the kitchen’s tiled barrel vault and the office’s tin ceiling were important components for the ambience of each space.”

Working with designer colleagues Patricia Duran and Susana Kempen as well as general contractor Patrick Lee, Scurtis was tasked with editing the home’s opulent look and giving it purpose. “It couldn’t be decoration for decoration’s sake,” she notes. “And the most important thing was to make this palatial home feel cozy.”

Scurtis began by looking up and down–at lighting and rugs. A Baccarat chandelier in the main living area, for instance, led to the introduction of a second one in the dining room, where the washed faux-wood paneling was an unfortunate shade of peach. “The room was impressive and intimidating, so to make it more elegant we painted the woodwork dark green–like a London supper club–and added an emerald rug featuring a massive leopard on it for a bit of fun,” Scurtis says. The piece rests beneath the owner’s sizable wood table surrounded by antique chairs.

A zebra rug, meanwhile, adds a note of playfulness to the mosaic tile flooring in the office. Sunny and airy, the space is minimally styled with new ivory-colored barrel chairs and the owner’s understated antique desk, allowing the ornate tin ceiling and French-style gold chandelier to take center stage.

A similar idea prevails in the family room, where the team stripped the dark blue ceiling beams and let the client’s rainbow-beaded chandelier come into focus. “A huge set of windows in the room looks out to a canal, so the water and chandelier became our palette guides,” Scurtis says. The trio peppered the o -white sofa with pillows in various textiles and added a rug with an indigo motif. As a final touch, framed HermeÌ€s scarves pop against the room’s new white-paneled walls.

The designers lined the family room’s bar with shagreen leather stools and placed a few more within view. “They’re repeated as counter stools in the kitchen, so there’s a connection from one space to the next,” Duran explains. There, the owner requested a display of art and objects, but Scurtis insisted they be related to culinary purposes. To compromise, she says, “We celebrated his heritage with African pottery and hung beautiful dishes on the walls.”

A nearby corridor connects to the main spaces, and to underscore its prominence, Scurtis lined a wall with mirrors as a nod to the Palace of Versailles. “The homeowner is in the hospitality industry, so he wanted his living spaces to recreate the attention to detail so prominent in his hotels,” Duran says. Along the mirrored wall, the designers placed a black settee to enjoy views of a courtyard it faces–one of the nontraditional ways they considered the client’s love for entertaining. “That hallway is so wide, I thought: What if you had a moment when you break away from the cocktail party where you could sit and enjoy the view?” Scurtis says. “You could have a cocktail party in the courtyard and move to the kitchen for dinner, where the food and prep provide entertainment and theater.”

But when it’s time for relaxation, the master suite is an ideal respite. In a clever move, Scurtis relocated a bed from a guest room–a better t for this space–and paired it with an ivory-colored sofa. To balance the tone of the traditional wallcovering, the team sourced a contemporary rug featuring abstract lines. And in the master bathroom, they added practical elements like a cozy chair and a blue cotton dhurrie rug near the freestanding tub.

By the project’s end, the combined taste of homeowner and designer helped transform the house, ushering it into the future. “His opulent aesthetic and my edited approach work well together,” Scurtis says. “Ultimately, it became a dance we did very well.”

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