For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

Sometimes a fresh start is exactly what’s needed. That was the conclusion of a young Denver couple after years of maintaining an older dwelling in the Washington Park neighborhood left them desiring more ease at home. By sheer coincidence, a new house was being built nearby and the idea of a move that didn’t mean saying goodbye to friends and neighbors was too good to refuse. The couple took the leap and relocated, bringing their longtime designer, Katie Schroder, along for the ride.

The home that caught their eye was designed as a contemporary take on the traditional Craftsman style. Working with architect Kathy Eichelberger Jones, Schroder was able to tailor the under-construction home to the clients with custom finishes and the addition of a playroom between the sons’ bedrooms, but the overriding mandate was to make the space warm and inviting. “The main goal was that this house be livable,” says Schroder. “They wanted a kid- friendly, dog-friendly house that looks beautiful, but where you aren’t afraid to sit down and relax.”

This was not the first interiors rodeo for Schroder and the couple. The husband (a software engineer) and the wife (a social worker) had also hired her to redesign their previous home. “By this time, I knew them very well, so working together was second nature,” says the designer. But that didn’t mean Schroder didn’t have surprises in store. “Katie can envision how best to use a space and, like us, she has two boys and she understands the needs of a family,” says the wife. “But she also knows how to nudge you out of your comfort zone.”

In this case, those style nudges mainly dealt with the color palette. The designer (whose firm’s motto is “color, pattern, culture”) notes that “this couple has a very British sense of color but viewed through a Colorado lens.” With that in mind, Schroder decided that although the house they left behind was done in shades of green, a new blue hue was required. “She practically fired green,” jokes the wife, who is now a blue convert. But this is far from a monochromatic interior. “You can’t have only blue in a house,” says Schroder, who encouraged the couple to consider a lively palette. That design philosophy is on display in the dining room, where a burnished-yellow ceiling floats above a gray wallpaper with a yellow branch pattern, and in the master bedroom done in many shades of purple and green.

But it was the living room rug that ultimately charted the color course, bringing in purple, green and orange to join blue. “I was chicken about some things,” admits the wife. “When I said I thought the rug had too much coral, Katie showed me how it would work. That’s why a designer is important.” For Schroder, it’s those votes of confidence that are key to a successful design. “In fashion, people have been given permission to mix patterns to create a boho look, and I think they’re starting to want that more in their homes now, too,” she says. “These clients trusted me, and that kind of trust is important if you want to create an extraordinary interior.”

The designer says that whimsy also played a role here as well, especially in the light fixtures. Rather than choosing a traditional chandelier for the dining room, for example, she opted for a pair of “cool, spidery lights that add a modern twist.” And in the powder room, she skipped typical sconces for the surprise of a curvaceous brass library light over the vanity. “This is a house where the fun little details add up to something great,” Schroder says.

It turns out the new home was a fit in unexpected ways. “At first we thought the house might be too big, but we use every inch,” says the wife. With everyone working and attending school at home, the husband uses the office, the older son uses the bonus room, the youngest son sits at the dining table and the wife is stationed in the breakfast nook. Even the dogs have their go-to spaces, one claiming the back of the sofa and the other a cozy niche below the stairs. The home’s basement level was intended to do double duty as a play and study area for the kids, but the pandemic has changed everyone’s needs and it now serves handily as an entertainment space for the whole family. “With all of us at home, including the boys and dogs, our home has to be livable. But Katie has also made it special,” says the wife. “We are very happy here.” Proof that change can be for the better.

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In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

The post In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Designer Ramey Caulkins knows some birthday presents are better than others. When her client (who is also a friend) called and said that what she most wanted for her 50th birthday was to completely redo her house, Caulkins was happy to help make her wish come true. “She lives in a stunning vintage home in one of Denver’s most beautiful old neighborhoods, but I would say that she had never really occupied her house like she wanted to, because she hadn’t furnished it as her own,” says Caulkins. “Her gift to herself was recreating it in a way that felt like an expression of who she is as a person.”

The home, a 1912 Spanish Colonial, had captured the client’s heart because of its unique bones: original leaded-glass windows, high ceilings, beautiful arched doorways and intricate millwork in every room. “They don’t make houses like they once did,” says the wife. “I fell for this one because every room seemed to have a story, but it wasn’t until Ramey came along that the furnishings came to life. She was able to edit each room to its simplest form and thoughtfully weave in all these unique layers of subtle color, texture and pattern.”

For the last 10 years, architect Stephen P. Ekman has worked with the owners on the house, restoring the exterior and improving the floor plan. In the latest iteration, he and Caulkins worked together to bring new luster to some of the home’s original interior details. “The goal was to create a cohesive style through the entire house, architecturally and interior design-wise,” says Caulkins. “We began with a spatial plan to figure out how they truly wanted to live in—and use—the house. Because the clients love to entertain, we needed to create plenty of seating areas. And because we were creating better flow between the rooms, we had to make visual connections with color and design elements so that the house would feel cohesive.”

The entryway announces the home’s new aesthetic, a marriage of old and new. Ekman removed layers of white paint from the stairwell to return the handrail and balusters to their original glory. “The feature is unusual and beautiful,” says Ekman. “And now it really shines.” Caulkins brought modernity to the entryway by wrapping the walls in an ethereal cherry blossom wallcovering that feels almost like an art installation in the light- filled space.

In the living room, Ekman designed a new, ornate fireplace mantel that has everyone believing it is original to the house, and Caulkins enveloped the space with paper-backed, oyster-colored fabric by Schumacher to soften and warm the large room. She took design cues from the homeowner’s heirloom rug and layered in patterns and subtle colors that complement its hues.

A sun room that the clients rarely entered has been transformed into an oft-used living space. “This may be one of my favorite rooms I’ve ever done,” says Caulkins, who covered its stamped concrete floor with hexagon-shaped Ann Sacks tile and oriented a cozy sofa and a pair of caned chairs around a bronze drum table to create a proper seating area. Ekman restored the barrel-vaulted ceiling, which now wears new paint to highlight its unique lines. The subtle textures and colors allow the original windows to take center stage.

A new spirit also infuses the dining room. “When you have beautiful bones like this in a house, you want your design choices to highlight them and not take too much attention away,” says Caulkins. Ekman and his team revived the distinctive molding in the room, and the designer oversaw the upholstering of the ceiling above the table in a fabric that looks almost like a watercolor mural. “It lifts the eye and exposes the intricacies of the millwork that may have gotten lost if we’d simply painted it all white,” she notes.

For Caulkins, the goal was an enduring style. “I really strive to design in a way that is timeless rather than trendy. I’m all about the layers and creating something that feels like it’s been slowly curated with a unique mix of old and new. That’s even more fun to do when I have architecture like this to inspire me.”

For the client, the house now feels like an extension of her personality, which is what she had always wanted. She says, “It’s a very personal house with unique touches, layers and details that tell a lovely story. I’ve fallen for my house all over again.”

 

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A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

The post A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


As a professional couple with young kids were building their family home in the Wash Park, Colorado, neighborhood, they found themselves facing a dilemma: whether to go with sophisticated and polished interiors or keep practicality at the forefront of their plans, since the spaces would have to stand up to their active children. As it turned out, they didn’t have to choose between the two. Their design team promised that they could have both by meeting in the middle, and that’s exactly what they did. “They wanted the house to work for the whole family,” says designer Ashley Larson Eitemiller.

“The homeowners were looking for a large family room for entertaining and for the kids, and a large, wraparound bar that would be open to the kitchen, dining and great rooms,” says residential designer Jim Gunther. Adds Eitemiller, “A lot of activities can happen at once in that open, communal space.”

The home was designed specifically for how the family lives, with various “stowaway spots” they can use as they come and go. “They’re bringing in strollers and all of the attendant kid items,” Gunther says, “so there are multiple areas with organized storage in the home’s front, back and side so they don’t have to carry things all the way through the house, and the open space can stay neat and organized.”

Function meets style with wood elements like corbels, beams and rough-sawn cedar that brings in the casual, Colorado mountain vibe the family loves. “The darker wood beams contrast with the caramel floors, making all the wood really stand out,” Eitemiller says. The couple’s art collection, which includes lots of landscape imagery, also offers a nod to the home’s Colorado aesthetic.

While cool gray color palettes have been wildly popular recently, the homeowners desired more warmth in their home. “They wanted tones that would make the house feel very homey and comfortable, and they were open to jewel colors,” says Eitemiller. “Every space has some element of blue, whether it’s a deep navy, a brighter blue or a beautiful smoky gray-blue. We also brought in some neutral grays, a honey caramel and a nice plum color.”

Layers of texture give the spaces dimension and visual interest. “Throughout, there’s a mix of leather, natural linen and mohair. The carpets are wool, and there are sheers on the windows that allow light in while also offering privacy,” Eitemiller says. “Every room has details designed to visually pull you through the house, such as the wallpaper in the front entry and ceiling beams in the main living spaces.”

Furnishings are stylish yet tough enough for a young family. In the living room, a pair of sofas in camel-colored leather marry beauty and durability, as do refined fiberglass Stone Yard coffee tables. “It looks well put together, but you don’t have to be monitoring everything that’s going on in the house,” says Eitemiller. “We also used Sunbrella outdoor fabric inside, which adds durability.”

One of the primary requirements for this home was to have designated spaces where kids can just take over and play. “Right now, the sun room is used for the kiddos, and it’s a great space right off of the living room and kitchen area,” Eitemiller says. “The children can be playing in that room while their parents are cooking dinner.” There’s also a dedicated playroom upstairs near the bedrooms, and a spacious gymnastics area and playroom downstairs that is designed with no beams or poles to get in the way of the fun.

The family also has a large yard, with plenty of grass for the kids to run around on, as well as exterior entertaining spaces for adults. “The homeowners like to have friends and family over,” says general contractor Patrick Englund. “In the backyard, they have a trellis with heaters above and an exterior fireplace.”

Having come from a home that wasn’t functioning well for them, the family is now enjoying the perfect balance between adult style and kid-friendly design, with fluid spaces for family life and special spots just for playtime. Meanwhile, the home’s interior spaces honor Colorado’s rugged style while giving it modern sensibility.

“We wanted the family to feel comfortable, so they could really live in the house,” says Eitemiller. “They wanted a relaxed, well-designed home that could be used to its fullest without the fear of it being damaged easily. A mountain Colorado feel—but a little bit more refined.”

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Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

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In 1928, architect Burnham Hoyt—a Denver native—designed a storybook brick Tudor in what is now a historic neighborhood in his hometown. One of five notable architects contributing to Denver’s City Beautiful movement of that era, Hoyt incorporated Jacobean, English Norman and French Provincial elements into the home’s design. Nearly a century later, a modern-day couple with three kids fell in love with the home’s history, style and location—but not its 1970s addition.

That expansion had left the home with some troublesome quirks the new occupants wanted to address. “The family room didn’t relate to the house and backyard, and there were many unnecessary little rooms,” says architect Steve Ekman, who worked with designer Peggy Robbins Bender and general contractor Doug Canady to restore and renovate the residence. “The new owners wanted to make this home their urban oasis.” They also wanted to preserve its historic details, which thrilled Ekman, a former trustee for Historic Denver. His team dug up the original architectural plans and photos at the Denver Public Library. “I have a historian on staff and he loves to do research,” Ekman says. “It’s sort of like archaeology for a house.”

General contractor Doug Canady restored the home’s exterior—and many interior elements—to its former glory. “There was so much work to be done—we cleaned the stone and the brick to bring out the old details,” says Ekman. “Doug did a great job of making the exterior sing.” Inside, the original living room, dining room and hallways were preserved but the additions at the rear of the house were removed to start fresh with more spacious, functional rooms.

Ekman’s team worked with Bender—one of their many collaborations—to create livable spaces that would accommodate contemporary furnishings. When styling the interiors, Bender let the home’s finishes lead the way. “The beautiful thing about a Tudor is the texture,” she says. “The palette is about rough-hewn timbers, stone and wood. There is a lot of warmth in the wood, and blue is a nice foil—so we pulled a lot of blues in with fabrics.”

Bender also incorporated playful patterns and splashes of color. In the entryway—where classic timbers, plaster and brickwork abound—she placed an elegant armchair upholstered with a head-turning fuchsia print. A few coats of soft gray paint freshened up the dark and dated wood-paneled dining room while at the same time helping to create a visual transition between the original part of the house and the new addition. “We found this great antique Jacobean-style sideboard that really adds detail to the room,” Bender says. In the living room, the timbers remain as they were, giving the room a cozy feel. With three kids and the family’s St. Bernard, Rufus, running around, the room offers an “away” space for the couple, with a drawing room feel. “It has the only original wood-burning fireplace,” Bender says.

The new great room is the family gathering spot. At one end, a Marvin accordion door folds back to link the space to the yard. Bender says the challenge with historic renovations is thoughtfully updating a home to make it functional. “A folding door—such a modern notion—seems like an unlikely fit for a Tudor great room, but it works,” she says. That door plus a host of new windows lend the formerly inward-facing home a strong connection to the outdoors. “The landscape is a huge part of this project,” Bender says. “You can’t have everything opening out without having something fabulous to open up to.”

Landscape designer Paul Wrona delivered by creating a lush, soothing garden. “We planted roses as the foreground for ornamental grasses,” he says. “We wanted wisteria to grow up the pergola and used a lot of grasses and a mix of perennial colors so there’s something blooming at all times.” Wrona also custom designed a swimming pool, as well as an outdoor dining area and a lounging spot. A 12-foot privacy wall was added to screen a new office building behind the property, and gently bubbling water features mask any traffic noise while also being lovely to look at.

The once labyrinthian home now suits the needs of the family while maintaining its old-world Tudor elegance. Ekman says: “The homeowner tells us that it functions so well, they are entertaining a lot more—they even had the husband’s company Christmas party here. It’s opened up their world.”

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A Family Brings A Coastal Vibe To Their Mountain Home {A Family Brings A Coastal Vibe To Their Mountain Home} – English

A Family Brings A Coastal Vibe To Their Mountain Home {A Family Brings A Coastal Vibe To Their Mountain Home} – English

The post A Family Brings A Coastal Vibe To Their Mountain Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“I wanted a Cape Cod home with a lot of windows and high ceilings,” says the wife, whose husband’s family owns a house on Nantucket. “We love the way we feel when we’re there, so we wanted our home here to have the look and sensibility of the beach house, even though we’re in Colorado.”

The wife, who has a fashion industry background, developed some initial design ideas. She then worked with residential designer Matthew Guderjahn, who drew up plans and brought these ideas to life. The homeowners also enlisted designers Heather Brock–a close friend from college–and Jennifer Wundrow, both based in California’s Bay Area, to refine the home’s design and interiors.

The initial plans called for adding a wall that separated the entry from the rest of the house, but the design team suggested removing it–making for a very open plan. “We wanted to open things up, so the entry, dining room, kitchen and living space were connected,” Wundrow says. Joining the interior spaces to one another–and to the outside–made functional sense and created the seamless indoor-outdoor vibe that the couple desired. “We wanted it to all feel related and inviting,” the wife says. “We envisioned a space where you’d get a drink in the kitchen, and then maybe sit at the dining table and chat with someone, before moving into the cozy living room, either by the fire in the winter or next to the open French doors in the summer.”The kitchen, dining and living areas were oriented to face the mountains. “To take full advantage of those views, there aren’t any window treatments,” Brock says. Views aren’t the only thing coming in through the windows. “We made a big effort to bring in as much light as possible,” adds general contractor Carl Fuhri. For Fuhri, building the home had a special, personal meaning. “We typically design and construct homes in a foursquare or modern style, so it was fun to create something with a Cape Cod aesthetic. I’m from the East Coast, so it was like going home,” he says.

To make the home personal for the family, it was built with outdoor living in mind. “We expanded their back porch to add a grilling area as well as a fire pit,” says landscape designer Robert Hahn. “They can be entertaining out there while watching the kids and dogs run around.”

The design team kept the home’s interior palette fresh. “We wanted it light and bright, as a beach house would be with the sun out,” Brock says. “We also used blue as the new neutral–or the old neutral, because it’s so classic–and we added some texture to bring it all together.” Natural textures, which also lend a subtle mountain feel, came in the form of a raffia console, carved-wood light fixtures and hide-covered benches. Patterns were also added to the mix. “I loved all of the prints that the designers helped me bring in,” the wife says. “We were able to keep a lot of the furniture neutral and then bring in some fun color through accessories and art.”

For furnishings, the couple started from nearly zero. “They brought almost nothing from their old home because it was a midcentury modern Eichler-style,” Wundrow explains. “It wasn’t a fit for the new home.” Instead, they went for furniture that’s stylish yet designed for family living, like the upholstered chairs at either end of the dining table. “Those big end chairs are super comfortable,” the wife says. “In the morning I go in and sit with my computer and coffee where I can see the kids running around and my husband in the kitchen.”

Throughout the home, touches like vintage rugs lend character. “They add a lot of depth and dimension that you can’t get from a new floor covering,” Wundrow says. “It gives you the feeling that you didn’t design the room all at one time.” Meanwhile, the family’s art collection includes some pieces that are particularly special. “My mother-in-law is an artist in Nantucket, and we brought a lot of her artwork here,” the wife says. “And my sister-in-law is a photographer, so many of her photographs are in our house, and I love that.”

Beyond style, the home was designed for functionality. “We bike and hike and go camping, and I have a horse and dogs, so we have a lot of gear,” the wife says. “In our previous home, we didn’t have a lot of storage, so that was one thing that we were very thoughtful about.” The homeowners were also intent on using every space in their house, rather than devoting square footage to rooms that would be used less frequently. The basement, for example, is brighter than you’d expect, with a big open stairway that allows natural light to flood in. “My boys will go downstairs and play,” the wife says, “so it feels like a space that’s used for living as well as storage.”

Outside, Hahn created landscaping evoking a casual farmhouse aesthetic, to match the area’s rural feel. “We kept the more manicured areas close to the house and, out toward the property line, it’s more native grass,” Hahn says. “The emphasis was on year-round interest and big splashes of color through flowering shrubs. Having areas for their kids to play was also important.” There’s a big playset area for the kids, for example, and plenty of grassy areas.

“We love having kids and dogs running in and out and inviting friends over to grill and sit by the fire pit,” the wife says. “Everyone’s kind of everywhere. It’s cozy and and casual and light and bright–in other words, very us.”

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Be A Rule-Breaker: Bring Beach Vibes To The Mountains Like These Colorado Architects {Be A Rule-Breaker: Bring Beach Vibes To The Mountains Like These Colorado Architects} – English

Be A Rule-Breaker: Bring Beach Vibes To The Mountains Like These Colorado Architects {Be A Rule-Breaker: Bring Beach Vibes To The Mountains Like These Colorado Architects} – English

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Boulder may be more than 1,200 miles to the closest ocean, but that didn’t stop architects Annette and Dennis Martin from building their dream beachfront-inspired home there. But in this house, the vistas are of undulating hills and noble mountains—a panorama rivaling any seaside view.

The Martins, partners in both business and life, are travel enthusiasts who love vacationing in waterfront locations designed to embrace the beach landscape. One house in particular, however, became the broad-brush impetus for their mountain abode. “We were inspired by a waterfront home in the Hamptons that allowed a glimpse of the ocean through the main room,” Annette says. “It was so inviting, we wanted that feeling here.” The memory of that drove the architects to recreate the look and feel of it on a site perched among the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Using the New York dwelling as their benchmark, they designed a house that wholeheartedly celebrates alpine views from the first room.

Built around a central courtyard to allow privacy from the street, the home welcomes guests both formally and informally. Exterior materials—gray Kansas limestone, rich brown vertical siding and light-painted wood—come together to create a warm, textural first impression. Refined architectural elements and contrasting rustic details feel more carefree than staid.

A limestone path guides guests through the courtyard to a beguilingly ornamented entry porch and large, wooden door. But when stepping into the entry and around a mirrored wall, the view is revealed, and that’s when the magic happens. “The entry sequence offers an anticipation of the view beyond,” Annette notes. “From there, guests are led to the great room, which is designed to be as transparent as possible, with oversize doors framing the amazing scenery.”

The great room acts as an elegant epicenter as well as a floor plan intermediary, graciously linking the kitchen, living and dining rooms while simultaneously insulating the master suite from the more public spaces. Design devices—statement lighting, built-in bookshelves and varying ceiling planes—delineate the large, open room into utilitarian subspaces, while white oak floors with a whitewashed gray finish throughout the home connect the dots.

In the living room, two seating areas provide further spatial cues. Center stage, a smattering of smoky-hued furnishings plays off the dark tones of the kitchen cabinetry and form an entertaining-friendly space for gatherings. Nestled up to generously scaled sliding doors that open to the terrace, the interior space blends seamlessly with the outdoors.

Across the room, a trio of seats dressed in blue velvet and nailhead trim form an intimate seating vignette created for fireside tête-à-têtes. Four kaleidoscopic Andy Warhol lithographs bring to mind summer flower gardens, colorfully crowning a streamlined concrete fireplace with a herringbone detail. This small but mighty gathering spot packs a vibrant punch, energizing the otherwise neutral palette and offsetting verdant views. “We wanted this room to become part of the outdoors,” Annette says. “The artwork and accent pieces really pop with their touches of bold color.”

Elegant and composed, the adjoining kitchen is a unifying element. Reminiscent of the home’s exterior, with the same contrasting tones and mix of materials, it feels equally light and dark, formal and relaxed. The 14-foot-long island is a study in yin and yang, its ebony cabinets topped with glowing Calacatta Borghini marble that’s seemingly lit from within. Jewel-like, champagne-hued ceramic tile balances the more casual painted paneling above. Translucent pendant lights over the island provide a hint of sparkle—subdued yet expressive. “We brought the exterior palette, which is light and neutral with dark accents, inside,” Annette says. “The kitchen is very calming, which we love.”

Equally comforting is the master suite, clad in an earthy hue that Annette refers to as an all-encompassing “brown, gray and green.” Separated from the great room via an ante room, the bedroom feels secluded and hushed—a private oasis punctuated with confident pattern that’s quieted by a cream-colored upholstered bed and shapely lacquered bedside tables.

The scene stealer here, however, may just be the floor-to-ceiling windows and doors that open to a generous rear terrace that runs the length of the house—though “terrace” may be a bit of an understatement. The space was envisioned to be a well-used outdoor room, complete with intricately designed beams, curvaceous brackets and lofty proportions equally appropriate for espying mountains or sandy beaches. “Coloradoans are outdoor people,” Annette says. “We wanted to create a grand area that exemplifies everything about outdoor living.”

It’s that love of the landscape and classic style that relates this mountain home to the Hamptons dwelling that inspired it. Yet it possesses a personality all its own. “All of the details and finishes are modern renditions of traditional designs,” says Annette. “I’d call this house a contemporary classic.”

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A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty {A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty} – English

A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty {A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty} – English

The post A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“It was mountains, mountains, mountains,” the owner of a Big Sky home says of the first time she laid eyes on the view from the lot where her and her husband’s Montana vacation getaway would eventually stand. The homeowners didn’t plan on building, but the special parcel, which looks to Lone Mountain, Cedar Mountain and Pioneer Mountain, immediately won them over.

In short order, they hired architect Larry Pearson, who had previously created a “little gem of a house” for a friend. Picturing a smallish, modern dwelling (the wife is an avowed modernist), the couple was surprised when he proposed a larger structure. Recalls Pearson, “They said, ‘Well, this isn’t what we were originally thinking about, but we like it. In fact, we love it!’ ”

From the front elevation, the residence appears modest. “It’s one story and very understated,” says general contractor Todd Thesing, who translated Pearson’s concept into a reality. “It unfolds as you experience the house and start moving through it.” Set deftly into the side of the mountain, the full scope of the 9,000-square-foot structure only becomes entirely visible from the back elevation. “When the client has the confidence to be a little bit original—and they did—they invite the possibility of both transparency and a low-slung design.” The shape harkens back to the ranch-style homes that the architect remembers from his Southern California boyhood. “I always loved the simplicity of that style,” he says, “As an architect, I have a predisposition for not giving it all away. This is a house that is designed around those principles.”

While the home’s front exterior was intended to blend into its surroundings, the interior was conceived to celebrate them, with large expanses of glass created to showcase those exquisite views. “Ten years ago, the engineering existed but windows of this size were not as accessible and had less thermal performance,” says Pearson. The structure itself also works to frame the views. Originally, the visible steel trusses were to have been clad with timbers. Instead, the team opted to have the steel carry its own weight, aesthetically speaking. The result, which carefully balances the home’s rich materials with the lightness and transparency of its design, keeps the focus on that spectacular scenery.

Integrating art and furniture into this framework so that it didn’t disturb the delicate balance that had been created fell on the shoulders of designer Lisa Kanning. “Everything was kept pretty simple,” she says. “You don’t want to detract from the views, but you also want enough interest in your interiors.” Kanning nimbly navigated her task, tipping toward a neutral palette and natural materials with subtle touches of color—like an olive-hued leather in the mud room, a red base for the breakfast nook’s table, the bright yellow of a chair in the den and the gray-green wash on the barn doors in the game room—pulled from the outdoors and the couple’s art collection.

She placed elegant, low-profile sofas in the living area, the game room and the den, all upholstered in gray tones, to echo the streamlined design of the house. “They tend to like cleaner, more European lines,” Kanning says of the homeowners’ preferences. The forms anchor the family’s collection of art by the likes of Charles Arnoldi, Rudy Autio, Joyce Scott and Squeak Carnwath. “That way, the colorful pieces can come in and make the impact they were meant to,” says the designer.

Touches of whimsy—a Sam Maloof rocker in the den, an overstuffed lounge chair and ottoman in the master, and Owen Mortensen’s ethereal tumbleweed chandelier in a guest room—ensure that the interiors hold their own against those stellar views. Striking the right balance so that, despite the sparely furnished rooms, spaces felt warm and inviting rather than cold or empty, was also a factor—every piece needed to pull its weight.

That was especially true when it came to lighting. “We had to get fixtures that wouldn’t interfere with the views but that would give you some light,” says Kanning, who worked with designers from Lindsey Adelman and Gabriel Scott to CP Lighting and Commute Design Studio to create custom pieces that, in addition to illuminating these spaces during short winter days, are sculptural and arresting in their own right.

The final effect is a home that, while large and spare, feels warm, abundant and inviting. So inviting, in fact, that soon after it was completed the owners decided to spend more of their time in Montana. Such is the primal, mesmerizing lure of the majesty of these mountains—and a home designed to celebrate its beautiful setting.

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Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home {Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home} – English

Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home {Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home} – English

The post Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Strolling past the grand mansions in historic Denver neighborhoods feels a bit like going back in time. With their classical architecture, expansive lawns and winding drives, these turn-of-the-century homes capture the art of graceful living in what was, even then, a burgeoning city. It’s this old-world charm that a couple of Boulder transplants instantly fell in love with when exploring neighborhoods looking for a spot to build a new home. So, when a property became available that was previously part of the historic Brinkerhoff estate, they knew they wanted to tap into that traditional spirit.

“We wanted something that had a sense of history, so it would fit into the area,” recalls the wife. However, as empty nesters, the home also needed to work for their more intimate lifestyle, one filled with Sunday family dinners and cocktail hours with friends. “We were looking for a combination—a classical look on one hand, but not overly formal or grand,” says the husband.

Searching for that balance between traditional gentility and modern ease, they turned to architects Don Ruggles and Melissa Mabe to marry both modes of living. “We’re well known for traditional architecture, but we’re always looking for ways to blend that style into a more contemporary feeling,” notes Ruggles, who also worked on the remodel of the nearby Brinkerhoff mansion, known for its classic French Normandy architecture.

Exploring different styles with the architects, the couple gravitated toward the simple elegance of an English Country cottage with a peaked roof and wood trim accents. “It’s a really intimate, romantic form that has a great sense of human scale,” explains Ruggles. “All the details feel almost close enough to touch.”

The team, which included builder Jeremy Larson, invoked this classic cottage mood with a gabled roofline, employing a pastoral palette of textured wooden beams, hewn stone and creamy stucco for the exterior. These details helped the home “have a sense of familiarity, respecting the history of this little district,” notes Ruggles. With a nod to modernity, however, the façade is punctuated with more hard-edge features like metal overhangs and a black slate roof.

Landscaping also proved key in carving out a graceful entrance. Situated on a hill, the home “had a big elevation difference between the street and the main door,” notes landscape architect Ariel Gelman, who collaborated with landscape designer Troy Shimp to bring the outdoor environment to life. “We wanted to create a smooth approach with gentle steps going up.” They also filled the tiered raised beds with flowering perennials that would bloom year-round, introducing a floral scape that “was a wink to that cottage style.”

This delicate balance continues inside, embracing more formal, enclosed spaces at the front of the house, which dissolves into a more casual, open-plan area. Refreshing, neutral hues between the textiles and furnishings keep stylish continuity between these realms. “The homeowners love the procession of a traditional layout, where you’re greeted by that kind of ceremony as you walk through,” explains Mabe, describing their approach to designing the flow of the home. “But when they want to relax, they can move further into the house and do some indoor-outdoor entertaining.”

This elegant procession begins in the entrance hallway and stairwell. Inspired by the grand molding of a traditional hall, “we wanted to channel that same spirit, but in a more streamlined way,” says Mabe, who collaborated on the interiors with Kelly Flynn and Emily Lindemann. Delicate English bead details in the molding and pilasters with simplified capitals “give you the idea of proportion in the space, but it feels softer and quieter.”

The dining room continues this stately footing, detailed with wainscoting and crown molding that provide a genteel stage for the family’s beloved antique dining set, which the wife grew up with as a child. “That set is coming up on about 100 years old now, and we’ve had it for almost 30,” notes the wife.

For more intimate gatherings, the couple heads further inward into the open kitchen and family room area that’s flooded with sunshine from the central courtyard, which is oriented to the south to receive the most light. “Architecturally, this allows so much of the interior and exterior of the house to unfold naturally,” explains Mabe.

It’s this area that the family gravitates to the most, as the team defines the open layout with natural social anchors, like the kitchen’s expansive island with rich molding details echoing the coffered ceilings above. Or on beautiful days, “when we have friends over, it seems they always end up in the courtyard,” says the husband. There, a natural stone fireplace with a towering chimney adds architectural heft to the space while providing a warming hearth.

It’s these quiet moments of grandeur in such intimate spaces that speaks most to the home’s reimagining of old-world entertaining. “There’s nothing overwrought or overdone,” notes Mabe. “It’s simply welcoming people with beautiful spaces.”

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4 Design Books That Celebrate The Diversity Of California Style {4 Design Books That Celebrate The Diversity Of California Style} – English

4 Design Books That Celebrate The Diversity Of California Style {4 Design Books That Celebrate The Diversity Of California Style} – English

The post 4 Design Books That Celebrate The Diversity Of California Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

PHOTO COURTESY RIZZOLI NEW YORK

Scott Mitchell Houses is the first book about the celebrated architectural designer known for creating modernist homes that respond to their natural surroundings. Mitchell’s designs are humanistic and offer a warmth seldom associated with minimalist contemporary design. It’s a vision that’s won Mitchell favor from such renowned figures as architecture critic Paul Goldberger, who wrote the foreword; Calvin Klein, also a contributor to the book; and chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa, who commissioned Mitchell to design Nobu Malibu. Fashion designer and film director Tom Ford even used one of Mitchell’s homes as a film location for Nocturnal Animals, his 2016 neo-noir thriller. rizzoliusa.com

Garden in Private Gardens of Santa Barbara

PHOTO COURTESY GIBBS SMITH

In Private Gardens of Santa Barbara, Margie Grace, principal of Grace Design Associates, takes readers on a journey through 18 gardens on properties that run the gamut from luxury estates to modest homes and even a few surf retreats. Their common thread is the practicality with which Grace approaches her work, realizing outdoor spaces that support the lifestyles and personalities of her clients. Each design takes into consideration soil health, native plantings, animal habitats, pollinators and water efficiency as well as beauty. Grace even published her own garden, which is divided into distinctive spaces, inspired by her neighbor, botanical garden Lotusland. gibbs-smith.com

Outdoor area in California Homes II book

PHOTO COURTESY IMAGES PUBLISHING

California Homes II is the long-awaited follow-up to architect William Hefner’s 2013 book and gives readers another indulgent look at Studio William Hefner’s impressive portfolio—this time with an in-depth look at homes ranging in style from contemporary to traditional. A fifth-generation Californian, Hefner has a profound understanding of refined spaces, openness and natural lighting that seems to come as if by birthright. His practice integrates architecture, interior design (headed by his wife, Kazuko Hoshino) and landscape, and this richly illustrated monograph artfully conveys the depth of character he instills in every project. imagespublishing.com

Vignette in David Wiseman book

PHOTO COURTESY RIZZOLI NEW YORK

This tome offers an in-depth look at L.A.-based designer and artist David Wiseman’s extensive body of work. Wiseman takes his cues from the natural environment (he used fallen tree branches found on a local hike to create his signature piece, the Radial Branch Chandelier, now in the collection at LACMA) and is best-known for his exquisite craftsmanship and detailed creations in bronze, porcelain and plaster. This book features sketches and photographs of his elaborately sculptural furniture and environmental installations, many of which are in private homes and rarely seen. rizzoliusa.com

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Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home {Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home} – English

Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home {Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home} – English

The post Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“I come from a family of pack rats,” she says, lamenting the limited capacity of her previous homes in New York and California to harbor her beloved bequests. So she found room to spread her wings on a forested hillside residence, and hired designers Joe McGuire and Matthew Tenzin to express her eclectic modern aesthetic by weaving together fresh furnishings with her diverse collection of rugs, textiles and family antiques against a modern backdrop.

The house was constructed by residential designer and builder Tim Semrau, who was inspired by the site. “Aspen trees surround the house and their tall, narrow trunks combine with the mountain ridge behind the home to give a true sense of the area’s verticality,” he says. The house is mostly crafted from an industrial palette of steel, glass and metal; though the rich mahogany siding roots the dwelling in its forested environment.

From the beginning, the project was highly personal, a process the homeowner has long been comfortable with, since her mother was a designer and conversations around her childhood dinner table were often about interiors. “Having your home be a place upon which you spend a lot of emotional energy because it’s your haven is just an idea I grew up with,” says the homeowner. “And it can’t be your haven unless it relates to you.”

The designers whole-heartedly agree. “It was a highly collaborative process driven by the client’s creativity and international tastes,” Tenzin says. “She wanted us to help her come up with an overall plan, and she loves so many kinds of patterns, colors and styles, she needed help reining it all in and creating a sense of balance and harmony.” Excited to punctuate her inheritances with a new selection of textiles and gallery-worthy sculptural furnishings, McGuire and Tenzin began to create stylish rooms that also feel familiar and comfortable.

In the master bedroom, for instance, a wool-and-silk prayer rug from the family collection hangs on the wall, while a more recent acquisition, a Navajo rug, lies on the floor. The crimson colors and geometric motifs found in both pieces create cohesiveness. A pair of pillow shams printed with Art Nouveau painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s famous cancan girls are a novel choice in a room where ethnic patterns dominate.

Likewise, in one of the guest bedrooms, another tribal textile on the wall–a Two Grey Hills Navajo rug inherited from the homeowner’s great grandmother–effortlessly jives with the woven-leather bench at the foot of the bed. The neon green, cerused-wood bedside tables play a dynamic role in an otherwise neutral space.

At times, the sculptural quality of a piece outweighs its function. “‘Plush’ or ‘cushy’ were never requirements for the furniture,” says McGuire. “However, the shape of things was paramount.” Shapely elements include a cedar bench designed to look like a giant clothespin that brings Pop art-inspired form and function to the foot of the modernist glass staircase in the foyer. A Lindsey Adelman chandelier with asymmetrical brass joints and amorphous glass spheres is suspended from a slatted ceiling, adding clarity to the dining room in more ways than one.

Further eschewing the popular notion of a mountain home and drawing on a global aesthetic, a Robert Sukrachand walnut bed is topped with nothing more than a Japanese futon to match the low-profile of the piece and the Thos. Moser dining chairs are influenced by midcentury Danish minimalism. The great room (vaguely Southwest inspired with its shades of sandstone and sky) features curvy swivel chairs with cozy dimensions and a built-in rectilinear sofa whose rigidity is softened with an assortment of snuggly pillows.

Two of the most striking pieces in the home, the black De La Espada Nest chairs that flank the stone-tile hearth, initially gave the designers pause. “We were unsure about this unconventional seating arrangement in front of the main fireplace,” says McGuire of the decor’s statement-making moment. “But the client had a clear vision for them, and they turned out to be whimsical and sculptural focal points that also serve as a quiet retreat.”

In a home where unconventionality is celebrated, the harmonious vibe McGuire alludes to might seem elusive, were it not for the time-tested idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. “Think of this house like jazz,” says Tenzin. “The occasional off-key notes create a higher-level harmony, and a lively sense of personality and authenticity.”

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