Inside A Mountain Home As Stellar As Its Views {Inside A Mountain Home As Stellar As Its Views} – English

Inside A Mountain Home As Stellar As Its Views {Inside A Mountain Home As Stellar As Its Views} – English

The post Inside A Mountain Home As Stellar As Its Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


First, the designers addressed the choppy layout by opening the space on the main level, removing two walls: one between the dining room and great room and another cutting the kitchen off from the dining area. They replaced the dated carpet and tile flooring in this space with gray-toned hardwood, which brings out the gray notes in the stone fireplace wall. Next came a new coat of paint for the interior and exterior walls. “Painting the walls white and accenting the trim with a warm, taupe gray changed the look of everything,” Schwab says. “Now, the space feels very current.”

In addition to those gestures, introducing metal and concrete into the architectural mix of glass, wood and stone further steered the project in a contemporary direction. They chose bronze, for example, to accent the custom entry doors, and married the metal with concrete in the master bedroom’s fireplace. They also used bronze to wrap structural columns and fill in spaces in the ceiling beams that were left when they removed the old track lighting.

In similar fashion, landscape designer Scott Kleski demolished the traditional slate-and-stone patio to make way for more modern porcelain pavers across a larger open space that was once bound by perimeter walls. “I wanted to take those walls out and let the patio flow all the way to the golf course,” he says. And as general contractor George Trusz executed the construction, he overhauled the home’s infrastructure in the process–a huge undertaking that included building new wind-shear protection after structural walls came down, removing an elevator and relocating heating and cooling systems. “I don’t think that we left any part of the house untouched,” he says.

When Schwab and Dinner were ready to furnish the home, part of their mandate was to infuse it with vibrant pops of color. “Our other homes have been done in neutral tones. I was ready for some color,” the wife explains. Shades of red and orange punctuate the lower-level media room and the patio just outside, and they also enliven the kitchen’s breakfast nook and sitting area. “We like to move colors around the interiors, so they repeat and act as accents in a neutral palette,” Dinner says. They also incorporated curvy shapes and organic patterns to offset the home’s angular volumes. “Each space has a counterpoint to those angles,” Dinner explains, pointing to elements such as a globe pendant over the breakfast table, a rug in the study that’s woven with oversize flowers and the wallpaper imprinted with leaves that fully envelops the powder room.

The designers worked with consultants at Ann Benson Reidy & Associates and Walker Fine Arts to fill each space with art, opting for sculptural objects to hang as groupings on the wall–another tactic to give linear planes more dimension. “This is how we ended up with some really fantastic pieces,” Schwab says. “Art can be all different kinds of media.” The designers also treated the lighting as artwork, choosing fixtures as varied as tissue-paper-like pendants hanging from red cords, a chandelier made of Shabbat candles by Israeli glass artist Shimon Peleg and light fixtures with gold-leaf interiors. “We’ve never had such iconic lighting,” the wife says. “The pieces add so much personality.”

Finally, Schwab and Dinner transformed the lower level into a media and games hub for the owners’ three children and their families, a tactic designed to keep them coming back every summer. “We wanted it to be sophisticated enough for adults with a little touch of whimsy for the kids,” Schwab says. The five guest rooms, Dinner adds, cater to the different ages–each one with its own signature wallpaper. “They really feel like destinations, not like sterile hotel rooms, and each of the rooms have a sense of fun,” she says. After their first summer there, the wife confirms the design has had its intended effect. She happily notes, “Now, the entire family wants to come here!”

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An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views {An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views} – English

An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views {An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views} – English

The post An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The place the couple finally selected was one familiar to architect Charles Cunniffe. It was a log-and-timber dwelling with massive stone pillars and a sunken living room that left the jaw-dropping mountain scenery almost hidden. Cunniffe, who worked with senior project architect Rich Pavcek on the project, had already completed renderings for the previous owners, who contemplated modernizing the structure. So, when the architect got a second chance to make the dwelling live up to its potential, he jumped at it. “The early plans clued everyone into the new character the house could possess,” says Cunniffe. “As we worked on it this time around, we refined the details.” Those elements included raising the living room’s floor and adding larger windows. When the architect showed the couple the home’s ability to capture the landscape, they were sold on the concept. “I’m a big view guy,” says David. “I’ve never seen anything quite like this. You can see Independence Pass and all four ski mountains.”

Sterling McDavid, the couple’s daughter and designer, was a harder sell. Initially, her parents’ home of choice was shocking to her. “The house was not their taste in any way,” she says, noting their refined Texas residence stood in stark contrast to the rustic getaway with distressed finishes. But the opportunity to remake the home and maximize the scenery ultimately swayed her as well.

The designer’s vision included modernizing the interiors, finishes and architectural details. “My style is contemporary, so I pitched that to my parents,” says Sterling McDavid. “At first, my ideas were a little startling to them.” But the couple eventually embraced the aesthetics of the plan, albeit nervously at the outset. “I was apprehensive,” David laughs, “But we raised Sterling and she knows us and our taste, so I had enough confidence in her to take the plunge.”

In an unusual move, the renovation began by creating a basement. “The opportunity to fully excavate the lowest level was not capitalized on by the previous owners, but the idea really excited David,” says Cunniffe. Senior Project Manager Brian Hanlen, who worked in concert with principal Shane Evans on the construction, explains, “We dug underneath the existing house to make a full basement, and then went deeper by four feet so we could create higher ceilings.” The new space provides an additional 2,500 square feet that allows for a gym and an elegant spa, which the owners count as some of their favorite rooms in the home.

While the basement was expanded, the upstairs was opened, simplified and slimmed. The design team removed walls to make a modern flowing floor plan, jettisoning clunky logs and timbers, widening windows to take in said views and installing rift-sawn oak floors and ceilings for warmer notes.

Outside, the rough-hewn log exterior was reclad with crisp horizontal siding and stone veneer. The thick pillars were drastically thinned, and the multilevel patios beyond them were united and streamlined. “It’s now one contiguous patio on the vista side,” says Pavcek. “It takes advantage of views that weren’t visible before.”

When it came to color, Sterling McDavid selected hues that reference nature and showcase art. “Many of the shades used resemble a mountain cave,” she says, describing a largely neutral palette of grays, beiges and whites. The exception is her father’s study, which features pops of chartreuse that reference the golden Aspens and greens of the mountains. The walls are mostly white to display the notable modern artworks the designer helped her parents amass. “There’s no better way for art to stand out than to be placed on a white wall,” the designer observes. The collection started with some Andy Warhol snapshots of Aspen, one of which shows the airport David helped build. That led to other Warhol artworks (10 iconic Campbell’s Soup Cans now hang in the dining room), as well as works by Russell Young, Peter Lik and Brian Donnelly, professionally known as Kaws.

The art, the new look and the location all add up to something extraordinary. As Sterling McDavid says, “It is more than just a house. It’s a place built for two of Aspen’s biggest fans.” And how do the fans feel about it? In his colorful style, David sums it up as, “We’re as happy as birds in the sunshine.”

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A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility {A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility} – English

A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility {A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility} – English

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The Bolins assembled a design team to make the dream a reality, and it was quickly determined that the home should be a reflection of the couple and the region itself. “They are super fun people,” says interior designer Barbara Glass Mullen. “While Aspen has a specific chichi vibe, the mid-valley–where Basalt is located–is more laid-back.”

Residential designer Richard Mullen created the getaway, dubbed Eagle Creek Ranch, with a traditional exterior that evokes the rustic buildings found at Roaring Fork Club and an interior with clean lines. “The clients wanted a mountain home but lightened up,” he explains. To that end, the team opted for elements such as plaster ceilings (as opposed to wood), light-hued beams (instead of the expected dark color) and wire-brushed, white-oak woodwork (in favor of wood with a knotty texture).

The home’s calming neutral palette is punctuated with shades of blue, one of Pat’s favorite colors. Reflecting the couple’s taste and lifestyle, Glass Mullen selected furnishings that are stylish yet comfortable and functional. Upholstered pieces, for example, have sophisticated lines but deep, soft seats and backs (and many are fronted by lounge-inducing ottomans). The interior designer also worked to add soul with special elements. “Barbara found some nice things for us, but she also mixed in antiques and pieces that came from Pat’s parents’ home,” Jane says, referencing artwork and rugs throughout the house and a small table in the master bedroom.

The light-filled interiors showcase the couple’s own art collection, including a painting commissioned by Theodore Waddell they acquired just for the home. “We had seen his work for years in Aspen galleries,” Pat says. “Once we built the bar in our great room, I thought a large Waddell would be beautiful there.”

An architectural piece of art is the structure’s elliptical staircase, which seems to float from floor to floor. “I wanted the handrail to be a continuous spiral that was not interrupted by newels or landings,” Mullen says. The signature element took six weeks to design, an aspect indicative of the craftsmanship employed throughout the residence, says general contractor Todd Cerrone. Another great example of sweating the details is found in the stonework, where each cut was made with care. “We didn’t want to see any straight lines in the stone, so the masons chipped every single edge with a hammer and chisel,” Cerrone says.

One of the challenges the team faced was how to make the home feel cozy for just Pat and Jane but expansive enough to fit their family when all are present. The answer was found in the arrangement of the rooms. The north-facing master bedroom aligns with the kitchen and great room, making an intimate suite-like space when it’s just the homeowners in residence. The three guest rooms–clustered on the east- facing side of the house–each have French doors opening to a porch and access to a shared family room. The layout allows for privacy and gathering, in equal measure.

“Every bedroom has its own story, which makes it kind of fun,” Jane says. A masculine bedroom, done in subtle purple, is a nod to the couple’s sons, whose alma mater is Texas Christian University, known for its purple Horned Frog mascot. Epitomizing the eclectic nature of the project, another bedroom contains romantic oral draperies as well as two contemporary blue side tables.

The exterior spaces are as important to the Bolins as the interior, hence a generous porch that’s the stuff of long, comfortable evenings spent in a rocking chair while appreciating the view. “They really wanted to enjoy the summers in Colorado, so everything was designed around the outdoor space,” Mullen says.

Landscape architect Richard Camp lent magic to the surrounding grounds, including adding an idyllic pond that seems to have existed on the site since 1895, when Basalt took its name from the rock formations on the mountains. “As you pass the pond, you continue around to the entry courtyard, where we saved a large stand of existing Aspen trees,” Camp says. Another stand of the trees is across the driveway, making for a picturesque grove that frames the entrance to the house.

Together, these features provide the Bolins with the indoor-outdoor experience they craved. “Pat has worked really hard all his life, and when we come here, within five minutes his blood pressure drops and he’s a whole new guy,” Jane says. “It’s an extremely beautiful, peaceful place to be.” Pat claims he still has to pinch himself to believe it’s real, saying: “It really is the home of our dreams.”

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This Colorado Home Goods Shop Shows An Appreciation For Character {This Colorado Home Goods Shop Shows An Appreciation For Character} – English

This Colorado Home Goods Shop Shows An Appreciation For Character {This Colorado Home Goods Shop Shows An Appreciation For Character} – English

The post This Colorado Home Goods Shop Shows An Appreciation For Character appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When it comes to decorating styles, sisters Abigail Vickers Cowan, Emily Vickers Kowal and Devon Vickers Davenport, cofounders of Denver home goods shop Worthing Co., are as different as can be, but each seems to have acquired the gene for skillfully mixing old and new. “We inherited our love of finding unique furniture from our grandmother, who took the time to teach my mom, who in turn taught us,” Cowan says. “All three of us think outside the box: Just because a door is a door doesn’t mean you can’t use it as a shelf or a headboard.”

That ethos is evident in the trio’s new Highlands Square house-turned-shop, where stylish accessories–from Pickwick & Co. candles to vinyl floor cloths in eye-catching vintage patterns–complement one-of-a-kind industrial- and farmhouse-style furnishings and accents. “When we select furniture for the shop, we look for character; something that looks like it has lived a long life,” Cowan says. “We definitely see the beauty in the proof of history.”

PHOTO: COURTESY WORTHING CO.

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A Modern Arizona Home Exudes A French Aura {A Modern Arizona Home Exudes A French Aura} – English

A Modern Arizona Home Exudes A French Aura {A Modern Arizona Home Exudes A French Aura} – English

The post A Modern Arizona Home Exudes A French Aura appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Holly Ogden, a house with well-proportioned rooms is the best primer for timeless and tailored decor. When it came to a home in Arcadia by residential designer Alan Gorzynski, Ogden had a canvas with practically perfect scale. “The clients had specific ideas about square footage and not being wasteful,” she says. “Every space has great intention in terms of how it’s used. From an interior design standpoint, this allows us to keep things well-edited and simple.”

The homeowners, Nancy and Adam Millstein–a couple with two grown children–moved from northeast Scottsdale to Arcadia to be closer to the vibrant city center. “We wanted a change,” says Nancy, who is retired from mortgage banking, which continues to be her husband’s line of work. “This house is a three-minute bike ride to downtown, where all the shopping and restaurants are.” Still, there’s a feeling of being removed from the hustle and bustle, as the backyard faces Camelback Mountain. “This part of the city is very lush,” Nancy says. “There are rolling lawns and orange, grapefruit, pomegranate, fig and olive trees everywhere.”

Although the lot was idyllic, the existing home left something to be desired. “It was built in the 1950s, and the roof was caving in,” Nancy explains. “It wasn’t salvageable.” The couple cleared the parcel and commissioned Gorzynski to design a 5,500-square foot structure that would fit with the architectural fabric of the neighborhood. “You could call what we created a French look,” he says. “It’s soft-spoken and elegant.” Steeply pitched roofs, wood shutters and a low perimeter wall made of stacked Telluride stone mark the front elevation, which features bright, textured cladding. “The exterior siding is washed with white mortar and is a combination of stucco and reclaimed Chicago brick,” says general contractor Brett Brimley, who managed the construction.

While the façade is reminiscent of something you might see in the French countryside, the interior displays a different aesthetic. “It’s a little more modern and clean,” Gorzynski says. There’s virtually no detailing or casework around the doors, walls or windows, which are framed with black aluminum for a minimalist look. The layout, however, is less straightforward. “It’s a meandering floor plan, which makes it more comfortable and interesting,” the residential designer says. “When things are perfectly centered or symmetrical, a home is stagnant.”

The fresh spaces gave Ogden a blank slate to create an equally elegant interior. “The house has a very warm, approachable feel,” she says. “Because there’s not a lot of color or pattern, I overemphasized texture.” Playing off the honed-limestone fireplace in the living room, she chose a sectional sofa wrapped in textured linen, wing chairs covered in black leather and a wood coffee table that references the space’s wood ceiling beams. “The different textures and finishes add layers,” she explains.

In the nearby dining room, she juxtaposed wood, leather and metal, outfitting the space with a cantilevered wenge-wood buffet, leather chairs, chrome chandeliers and a 14-foot-long walnut dining table–perfect for the clients, who love to entertain.

Throughout the home, furniture silhouettes combine classic and contemporary styles. “I like it when you love a room but can’t put your finger on what exactly makes it what it is,” Ogden says. “My goal is to look at an interior as a whole.” The living room’s wing chairs and collection of antique Chinese pottery are traditional, but the low-slung sectional and the coffee table have more of a modernist presence. And although the interior designer gave the entry a classic feel with a traditional-style settee and an oil portrait, she set a contemporary tone in the master suite by appointing a custom-upholstered bed with clean lines and an understated chaise lounge. “My clients wanted the master to feel like a chic city hotel,” she explains.

Outside, landscape designer Jeremy McVicars matched the grounds to the house using DC Ranch stone, iceberg roses, Little Ollie hedges and Bradford pear trees. “We created a nice mixture of formal plantings with more organic wall and paving materials to have a transitional relaxed feeling,” he says.

A fresh escape in a vibrant area, the Millsteins’ new home is a comfortable haven for the couple–not too big, not too small, but just right. “There’s a wonderful humanistic scale,” Ogden says. “This house is more about what we didn’t do as opposed to what we did. It’s thoughtful and restrained.”

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Fall In Love With Sleek Simplicity With This Colorado Custom Furniture Company’s New Line {Fall In Love With Sleek Simplicity With This Colorado Custom Furniture Company’s New Line} – English

Fall In Love With Sleek Simplicity With This Colorado Custom Furniture Company’s New Line {Fall In Love With Sleek Simplicity With This Colorado Custom Furniture Company’s New Line} – English

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At first glance, the handcrafted pieces that comprise Colorado custom furniture company Sjotime Industries’ first line of ready-made residential furnishings are striking in their simplicity.

Crafted of white oak, these modern tables, seats and accessories rely on subtle details—notched tops that expose the end grain of subtly angled legs, the linear quality of rift-sawn wood—to catch the eye. But according to Sjotime (pronounced “show time”) founder Dan Sjogren, this style, which takes cues from Scandinavian furniture designs, is anything but simple. “The attention to detail, the primacy of materials in their natural state and the elegance of execution and composition…is a very challenging aesthetic to achieve,” he says.

To pull it off, he and his team use modern technology and time-tested techniques to build each piece. The finished products are sold online and, as of last summer, at the Sjo Room, a storefront in Denver’s Golden Triangle neighborhood that Sjogren designed to feel like an apartment. “There’s an uncluttered, Scandinavian vibe to the interiors that’s meant to highlight the personality of each piece while giving customers a feel for how the furniture and artwork might work in their own homes,” he says.

An Arizona Abode Is Designed For Family Gatherings {An Arizona Abode Is Designed For Family Gatherings} – English

An Arizona Abode Is Designed For Family Gatherings {An Arizona Abode Is Designed For Family Gatherings} – English

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Now empty nesters, the couple had lived in a Paradise Valley residence before, but the house was ornate and European in feel and wasn’t a perfect fit for the two. “It had lots of heavy stone and faux-rustic elements,” says Parker Lee. “So much of the Southwest look gets reproduced, and these clients like casual but not anything rustic. They wanted a little a bit of refinement.”

The couple’s new house, whose interiors Parker Lee characterizes as “streamlined classical,” features rich details brought to life by builder Dominick Abatemarco, such as weighty walnut doors with pure bronze hardware and Venetian plaster walls, polished and mottled to provide “a clean old-world finish,” he says. The design–which originated with architects Mark Candelaria and Meredith Thomson yet evolved along the way–boasts clay roof tiles that are flat, in contrast to the region’s prevailing Spanish-style barrel aesthetic. “They’re not showy people,” Abatemarco says of the clients. “Those kinds of sharp details were key.”

To put the rooms together, Parker Lee and the wife visited showrooms in Los Angeles and Arizona, settling upon traditional and modern pieces interspersed with antiques and custom-designed furniture and cabinetry. “My favorite thing is to create a mix that feels personal and collected,” Parker Lee says. In the living room, contemporary leather lounge chairs commune with an antique limestone mantel and small lamps set on custom Wiseman and Gale etageres. In the formal dining room, custom-built oak cabinets root the room while serving as the perfect foil for a handblown chandelier with shell-shaped crystals by John Pomp.

Shades of blue and gray are dominant, a palette chosen by the wife “who has always loved blue,” Parker Lee notes. Though Paradise Valley is an elite province, the couple prizes the area’s “neighborliness.” Their priority was providing an array of gathering and dining spaces for their extended family, including relatives nearby. “Our dining spaces allow everyone to have a seat at a table and sit comfortably, which was very important to us,” says the wife.

Various shades of teal, cornflower and navy blue permeate the adjacent family room and custom-designed kitchen, including an enormous kitchen island. The kitchen is the family’s center of gravity, with an office and sitting area to one side–the perfect space for mulling over recipes. Metal pendants and walnut shelves add an earthy feel. The space is deliberately oversized “so that everyone can congregate there and share in the cooking,” says the wife.

When the brutal triple-digit summer heat is behind them, the couple throw open the retractable doors to the patio and the gardens beyond, which are the vision of landscape architect Jeff Berghoff. “During construction, a majority of the site was disturbed and had to be recreated,” he notes. “We blended in native trees and shrubs transitioning to a lusher botanical look as you approach the home.” The negative-edge pool was situated to take in views of the city and mountains; in an architectural sleight of hand, visitors arrive through the front gate, which has views of the back patio, and wend their way up a drive to the main entrance at the back.

At sunset, the mountain’s rust-red boulders become luminous, the foreboding aspects of the desert landscape giving way to something almost tender. In such moments, this thoughtfully designed residence brings to mind the spirit of a Navajo blessingway, enabling the couple and those close to them to “walk in beauty.”

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An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined {An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined} – English

An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined {An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined} – English

The post An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Perfect in theory, that is. Built in 1997, the house had the square footage the couple wanted, but the finishes were dated, and the layout needed work. “You had to have some imagination,” the husband explains. “We walked through and said, ‘We could do this, we could do that.’ ” To make their dreams a reality, he and his wife reached out to designer Laura Kehoe, whom they’d collaborated with previously.

The couple’s Paradise Valley residence had been Kehoe’s first commission when she launched her Scottsdale firm in 2010, and she later worked on their Southern California beach house. The designer understands their love of rooms that are traditional with a “kick your feet up” vibe, she says, but this was an opportunity to give them something fresh. “I wanted it to feel different, not like their main home,” says Kehoe, “I wanted them to feel like they were getting away.”

Kehoe happens to be very skilled at creating environments that not only complement their inhabitants but have a sense of place. The Paradise Valley residence, with its warm tones and intricate details, set a more formal tone, while in the mountains, “there was a huge importance placed on comfort,” Kehoe says. “This was easy, because with cooler temperatures, we were able to utilize extra soft and cozy fabrics.”

Before Kehoe could get to work, architect Anne Sneed began conceptualizing how the interior architecture could meet the needs of the growing family for years to come. She drew up plans for a host of changes that included redesigning the lower level to accommodate an expanded family room, a bar and a bunkroom, as well as enclosing the staircase up to the main level to ensure that noise wouldn’t travel upstairs.

General contractor Ryan McCormick joined the team and proposed ways to replace the home’s existing honey-colored woodwork with walnut–a request from the husband. He wrapped the exposed ceiling beams and trimmed the windows and doors with wide walnut moldings. “Originally, there were standard 3-inch moldings,” McCormick says. “Now they range from 4 to 7 inches, which adds mass and interest.”

Reclaimed brick from New York gave the new downstairs bar a pub feel, while silvery-gray barnwood lent rustic character to the adjacent powder room. Upstairs in the kitchen, the dated yellow-pine cabinets and tile counters were replaced with a sophisticated mix of Calacatta marble and honed black granite, walnut and silver-gray cabinetry, and a backsplash of gray ceramic tile. Counter chairs in tones of gray–with solid leather seats and fabric print backs–complete the look.

“It’s not a modern home, but it has cleaner elements than we’ve used with these clients,” explains Kehoe. Pointing to the blue-gray millwork used on all three levels, she adds, “That stormy color reminded us of the mountains, but here it’s more ‘mountain modern.’ ”

As the bones of the house took shape, Kehoe began selecting a range of fabrics to give the living room depth and texture, including chesterfield-style armchairs with a rich gray leather frame and contrasting velvet pillows. Plaid wool throw pillows add extra warmth. “We wanted the woodwork to tell the story of the house,” she says. “So, we balanced it with soft fabrics and kept the colors neutral so none of them would overpower the house.”

The dwelling sleeps 21, and two bedrooms on the top floor are designed to do double duty for the couple’s children and grandchildren with built-in bunks and king-size beds extending from inviting walnut niches below. For the bunks, Kehoe and her team specified industrial-steel ladders guaranteed to hold up to wear and tear. “Everything was meant to take a beating,” she says. “It was a very important consideration that we thought through on every single decision–everything had to stand the test of time.”

“Laura thought of everything,” says the husband. “We wanted an elegant house, but also a place that people could enjoy and not be afraid to sit on a chair. Here we can be upstairs enjoying a book and the fire, and the kids can be downstairs, and everyone’s happy.”

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Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure {Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure} – English

Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure {Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure} – English

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When a Chicago couple with three children decided they wanted a lifestyle change, it set them on an adventure that landed them more than 1,000 miles away in the house of their dreams. “We realized we could live anywhere, as long as it was near an airport,” remembers the husband. “So, we started thinking about where that place would be.” Although they spent hours considering the ideal location, they kept coming back to Colorado, given the happy childhood memories the husband had of camping and skiing with his family in Steamboat Springs. As they researched the perfect town, all signs seemed to point to Boulder, Colorado. “It has everything we want—including access to nature and better weather,” the husband notes.

With their location determined, they set out to build their dream house. “We found a lot in an awesome neighborhood that offers both nature and a great community,” says the husband. “We wanted our kids to spend a ton of time outside, and this neighborhood has great access to trails.”

The next part of the adventure involved building a structure that made the most of the site while allowing the homeowners to live the family life they envisioned. Since they would be managing the project remotely, working with a team they could trust was key. “They were only on the job site a handful of times, and the trust they put in us was extraordinary,” says general contractor Tom Stanko. “Every person there knew the family had a lot of faith in us, and we did our best to give them the house they wanted.”

What that looked like was hard to categorize. The homeowners came to architects Dale Hubbard and Kim Cattau and residential designer Anna Slowey with the idea of a modern farmhouse. “The thing about that term is that it has been used so often, it can mean just about anything,” says Hubbard. “But after talking with the clients, we realized that what they wanted was a family compound on their land—something with deconstructed massing, like a group of buildings you’d find on a traditional farm. We also realized that they wanted ornament that was deliberate, utilitarian and almost industrial in feel.” Slowey notes that the choice of color palette and crisp details advance the concept of a modern farmhouse. “Everything is crisp and beautifully articulated,” she says. “We took the traditional idea of a black and white color palette and modified it a bit, nothing here is a true black—the dark color comes from blackened steel. It gives the house a clean, modern feel.”

The house became a U-shaped structure that, at first glance, resembles a cluster of buildings. In this configuration, one wing is for the bedrooms, the other is a guest suite and in between—or the bottom part of the U—is the public space comprising the entry and a combined great room, kitchen and dining room.

One of the forces that propelled this family from the Midwest to the mountains was a desire for their kids to live outside. With that in mind, Cattau says that the architects designed the house from the “inside out,” making access to the yard and the open spaces beyond priority. “We worked to make the volumes inside feel good, they are comfortable and flow together—it’s an easy space to be in,” she says. “But we also worked to make sure that all those rooms have access or sight lines to the yard and the hills.” In practice, this means that someone could get up from the kitchen table and walk unimpeded through the large sliding doors and into the pool, if they are so inclined. The same goes for the ground-level master suite.

The outdoor space, executed in concert with landscape architect Luke Sanzone, looks like a residential version of a mountain resort. After all, it contains the aforementioned pool, an in-ground spa, a generous lawn and a large fire pit all set against the backdrop of rolling mountains. But this is sophistication for all ages; the boulders surrounding the pool are set in a way that allows kids to climb and, most importantly, leap into the pool. “The home is designed with a series of little landing spots and places to retreat,” says Slowey. “The landscape is no different, it has very intentional destinations to gather. The whole backyard has a very fun feeling.”

It’s a feeling that flows upstairs to the kids’ rooms, which were crafted not only for rest, but for sleepovers with cousins who visit frequently. “We worked in collaboration with designer Megan Hudacky on all the rooms, and we wanted to make the boys’ room feel a bit like a sleepaway camp,” says Slowey. Adds Hubbard, “you could look at the entire project as a sanctuary.”

And after the stress of relocating, a sanctuary was what was called for. “To pack up and move like that was scary,” says the husband. “But it was so much fun to have the vision, and then execute it. Today we walk around in the house we dreamed about, and watch our kids enjoy it as we hoped.” This is one leap of faith that had a happy landing.

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A Bright Bay Area Abode Is Rich With Texture {A Bright Bay Area Abode Is Rich With Texture} – English

A Bright Bay Area Abode Is Rich With Texture {A Bright Bay Area Abode Is Rich With Texture} – English

I want to design houses that feel good versus ones that look decorated,” says designer Alison Davin, who transformed a Tuscan-style residence in the Bay Area into a warm and modernist home that’s filled with tactile fabrics and finishes.

From the moment the designer laid eyes on the house, she knew she wanted to peel back the dated details and simplify the aesthetic by filling the rooms with comfortable and tailored silhouettes and plenty of sunlight.

“The property is on several acres and steps down a hillside with three different grades,” she says. “My clients are very easy-going and they bought the house because they wanted it to be a hangout for their children and their friends as they grow up.”

Davin went with a mostly neutral palette. She customized a sofa wrapped in cream-colored linen for the family room, where she also arranged a brown-and-cream striated wool rug, cream-colored embroidered drapery linen and a pair of rush stools.

“I used a whole bunch of different textures,” she says. “I love using texture instead of color because I think it keeps the space calm and warm and gives visual interest that’s subtle.”

In the family room, the designer replaced small arched doors with massive bifold ones that tie the area to the outdoors and let natural light wash over the rich textures that fill the space.

“I think I’ve done a good job if, when a person leaves a house I’ve designed, they remember that it was warm and comfortable,” she says.

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