Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver {Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver} – English

Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver {Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver} – English

The post Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“The couple appreciates American antiques, and they gravitate toward a red, white and blue color scheme,” explains Watts. “I took the colors and added my own eye to them.” The result is an inviting dwelling done in shades of pale blue, berry red and whites that beautifully complement the clients’ collection of heirlooms and needlepoint pieces.

“The house was newly built, and I noticed a lot of potential the first time I saw it,” remembers Watts. “I was in charge of adding warmth with personal touches through elements like finishes, wall coverings, drapes and lighting.”

Serving as a prime example of Watts’ nuanced color palette approach, the dining room features navy-and-white patterned seating, two deep-red wicker captain chairs, and drapes with a delicate blue-and-raspberry floral pattern. The varied color intensities and textures give the room “depth and interest,” Watts points out. The crisp white paneling provides a fresh backdrop for pieces like the dark-wood antique sideboard, while “the lighter tones in the rug, walls and drapes make the darker colors pop,” she adds.

A subtle color shift happens in what the family calls the “puzzle room,” where a cool, light blue-gray shade allows the warm natural tones of the pine armoire and round table—around which relatives can leisurely tackle a jigsaw—to shine. Again, a similar light-dark contrast occurs between the living room, where a large wall of glass doors sets the walls aglow with natural light, and an adjacent sitting room, which feels cozy covered in a blue grasscloth, blue-hued rattan sofa and a striped blue-and-white rug.

In the kitchen, the color needle reverts to white. Working with the room’s pre-existing dark-wood ceilings and light cabinets, Watts tied the space with the rest of the house adding navy counter stools and a red lantern fixture from Harbinger New York.

Beyond the main living space, the colorway extends to two bedrooms that each take on an Americana hue. The red room gets a big dose of pattern from the flowered Schumacher fabric that covers the bed frame and composes the drapes. “With the boldness of the floral textile, I selected calmer bedding,” notes Watts. The blue bedroom sounds a quieter note, with pale walls and blues that run from sky to navy. “The client has a collection of wildlife and nature illustrations, and this seemed like the perfect space to hang them,” the designer says of the soothing room.

When paired with refined accents and beloved furnishings, the edited palette makes for a cohesive design that’s both charming and functional. “The rooms relate to each other beautifully, and you can move pieces from one room to the next as needed,” says Watts. “I love how a simple idea became something so layered.”

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The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign {The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign} – English

The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign {The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign} – English

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The lobby and living room at Aspen resort The Little Nell have always been among the chicest meeting spots in town, but a new redesign by Luis Bustamante Studio of Spain quite literally casts the spaces in a new light.

The lobby sports lightened-up wood finishes and introduces a motif of striking geometries, seen first in round brass tables that rest atop a geometric-patterned rug. The split-level living room beyond features new furnishings along with bold paintings by Bustamante, formerly a professional painter and sculptor.

“Because Luis Bustamante’s background is in sculpture,” says the design firm’s Julian Castillo, “he conceives space as a whole piece of art, where there is a strong interplay between the materials, lighting, furniture and artwork. Then there’s the place: In response to the climate in Aspen, especially in winter, the first thing you’ll feel here is coziness—the feeling of being embraced, warm and protected.”

In other words, all the vibes a storied ski resort should deliver.

PHOTO COURTESY THE LITTLE NELL

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A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm {A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm} – English

A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm {A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm} – English

The post A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The designer and architect Matt Stais collaborated on a design that spoke to Amy’s personality, with references to her roots in Cape Cod. “She’s fun, playful, young and she has a lot of spark,” Schumacher says, “She also wanted the home to reflect Cape Cod, so we incorporated all of those things.” The hydrangea-lined driveway leads to a shingled home whose exterior is illuminated by gas lanterns—all of it a nod to Amy’s New England upbringing. Inside, she gave Schumacher carte blanche to design a new environment for her and her kids.

The designer set the tone with a chic take on a ski-lodge fireplace, inspired by the couple’s 25 years in Breckenridge, where Rob and Stais developed a series of resorts. Here, a floating chimney is lined with a cobalt-blue wood veneer wallcovering that sets the home’s palette. “It’s the first thing you see when you come through the front door,” Schumacher says. But getting it there took some serious engineering. “The hanging fireplace was a big deal,” Stais says. General contractor Dan Fuller says his team had to add additional structure overhead so the ceiling could support its tremendous weight, in addition to steel and concrete bracing all around so it wouldn’t sway.

Schumacher showed the fireplace wallpaper sample to her cabinetmaker, who responded with cabinetry for the bar and kitchen in the same color. She then added feminine touches to the kitchen, like bumping out the blue drawers to resemble a bedroom dresser and incorporating a jewelry-like brass detail on the custom range hood, the barstools and cabinet hardware. The same combination is present in the powder room, where she commissioned a chinoiserie wallpaper on a gold background over a deep blue antique console retrofitted to be a vanity.

For the most part, however, the designer kept the interiors neutral to keep the views center stage. But that didn’t mean Schumacher had to abandon her artistic license, especially in Amy’s bedroom: “She wanted it to be soft in color, but at the same time, we gave her snakeskin wallpaper, and we rocked out her bathroom and made it girly. It is just for her, so it reflects her personality.” Schumacher also created a living space that could easily evolve over the years. Big white comfy sofas offer a crisp backdrop for new accent pillows, rugs or throws. “It has a chameleon-type of essence. You can play with pattern and colors and not have it be overly designed,” she says.

Equally important was the outdoor living space, whose prominent views are in front of the house. “It was really about how everything related to the outdoor patio,” says Stais, who situated it on axis with Mount Evans in the distance. He then wrapped the house around the patio with bedroom wings for Amy and the kids extending off the central living area. Glass pocket doors disappear into the walls to make the great room and dining area one with the patio, which is just as large as the interior space.

Landscape designers Nick and Elizabeth Pisani surrounded the patio with low stone walls, ornamental grasses, rose shrubs and dwarf evergreens. “We had to come up with some creative ways to give her privacy in the front but not block her views,” Nick Pisani says. Colorado River boulders throughout the landscape help to soften the home’s linear geometry.

Though nearly everything is located on the main level, there are two guest rooms and a
TV room downstairs. Stais jokes that he was personally invested in designing “really great” guest rooms because his family hopes to be frequent visitors, having become so close with the couple over the years. “This is a lot more than a new house for Amy,” he adds, taking a more serious tone. “It’s a way of moving on, and I took that very seriously.”

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A Denver Home Transforms With Color & Pattern {A Denver Home Transforms With Color & Pattern} – English

A Denver Home Transforms With Color & Pattern {A Denver Home Transforms With Color & Pattern} – English

The post A Denver Home Transforms With Color & Pattern appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


When she met her clients–who were preparing to relocate from New Jersey to Denver with their 7-year-old son–Schumacher instinctively knew their project would be all about mixing different pieces and styles. “They are young, so it was important that the house be fresh and light and incorporate items with both a classical feel and a sense of whimsy,” she says. The homeowners had a similar flash of intuition about Schumacher: “We are a little quirky,” admits the wife. “And we were drawn to Andrea because, on the surface, her work looks fairly traditional, but look closer and there’s a wink.” But those clever moments would have to wait until the designer and her team, including project manager Troy Rivington, worked some magic on their new home–an ailing 1990s house.

Described by the wife as “an old-school Denver house with dark wood everywhere,” the initial budget didn’t match the laundry list of items required for a full transformation–“There wasn’t enough lipstick for all of that,” Schumacher laughs.

But what started as a kitchen and family room makeover quickly became a project of larger proportions. “When we saw what she was doing, we had to do the rest of the home,” says the husband who, along with his wife, signed on for a full-house remodel. “We wanted it to flow.”

And flow it does. The designer stained white-oak floors a deep espresso color and spiced up dated trim with dark gray-blue paint, tying the spaces together and establishing the backdrop. Schumacher’s team evened things out by replacing rough-textured, knockdown drywall with smooth surfaces in the living and dining rooms and grass cloth in the kitchen and family room.

The home’s youthful vibe is announced at the entry with the combination of a gold-leaf mirror, blue ceramic lamps with a midcentury vibe and wallpaper with a bronze abstract pattern. “We wanted whoever walks in to know this is the house of a young couple that likes to have fun,” says Schumacher, who punctuated the assemblage with a Balinese sculpture discovered by the owners on their travels.

Schumacher says she’s often inspired by fabric (“preferably one with three or four colors”), so she used colorful draperies with a floral, Asian feel as the driver in the living room. A pair of metal-framed Bernhardt chairs with azure velvet cushions and the gold-toned throw pillows on the sofa were a direct response to the blues and yellows that dominate, and the juxtaposition of a brass pulley light fixture on one side of the sofa and a crane lamp sporting a silk shade on the other is pure Schumacher. “I like to bring a little humor into the conversation,” says the designer, who went further for the wink by pairing a classic upholstered armchair with a side table supported by brass bird legs

A hint of pink on the curtains carries over to the dining room where the French Klismos chairs are upholstered in a similar shade, and a pink-and-green Sputnik light casts a glow on an oval wood table rimmed with bronze. From there it’s a glance away to the hammered-bronze coffee table and metal-trimmed side tables that sparkle in the family room. “I think brass and other warm-toned metals are here to stay, and they are fun, happy elements to weave throughout,” says Schumacher, who continued the shimmer in the kitchen with metal-framed barstools and a brushed-brass chandelier. Kitchen designer Kendall Lacroix selected the cabinetry in a soft gray-blue that lines the remodeled room, and the center island and leather barstool seats are matched to the darker steel-blue molding.

Fabric rules again in the master suite where Schumacher pulled colors from the vibrant draperies for the tomato-red pillows and the welt trim on the chair. The sculpted linen headboard is an elegant touch, brass lamps proved irresistible and, when the wife came home with a had-to-have Jonathan Adler floating star chandelier, no one objected.

“The designers really understood us,” enthuses the wife. “Andrea’s little jokes and quirky touches show lots of personality and are keeping with who we are.” The result is a mash-up perfectly tuned to the family.

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A Ski Resort Home With Interiors As Fresh As The Mountain Air {A Ski Resort Home With Interiors As Fresh As The Mountain Air} – English

A Ski Resort Home With Interiors As Fresh As The Mountain Air {A Ski Resort Home With Interiors As Fresh As The Mountain Air} – English

The post A Ski Resort Home With Interiors As Fresh As The Mountain Air appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


However, the existing residence by the architecture firm Ruscitto Latham Blanton and built by general contractor Magleby Construction-Sun Valley had hewed closer to the more traditional vibes of mountain living, with an emphasis on darker, more rustic detailing. “This makes a lot of the homes of Sun Valley inwardly focused,” Mauney says. “We really wanted to reverse that philosophy with a quieter interior palette so that the focus became what’s outside.”

Customization proved the key to lifting the overall mood of the space. The designers teamed with the general contractor that had originally built the home, working closely with project manager Chris Hoy. In place of darker, heavier finishes, selections like white-oak flooring and a subdued gray wash applied to the ceiling beams serve to soften the interior’s tones. More personalized details brought a welcome sense of delicacy, like the custom pewter range hood that lends a metallic shimmer to the open kitchen and the hand-painted tile with a pattern of pointillist circles in the powder room. “In our projects, we’re always asking what another interesting layer of material is that we could add to a space to take it up a notch,” notes Blank. “We are constantly trying to make sure we aren’t just simply checking the boxes and are considering how we can elevate a home, either through a cabinet detail or an unexpected finish material.”

The team also made subtle changes to the home’s flow, carving out gathering spaces to pivot to the outdoors. For example, Mauney suggested removing the kitchen’s upper cabinets to make room for more windows. “We knew just on the other side of the wall that there was the hillside,” she notes. The change makes the whole space feel more open and lets light filter around the main living areas. In the great room, they replaced sliding glass doors with windows and installed a banquette below to form a casual dining area. Moving this central communal spot next to the view “helps the space breathe a little more,” says Blank, adding, “We wanted it to feel open and not like we just have rows and rows of furniture legs. Billy Baldwin used to say a room with too many naked chair legs felt restless.”

For the furnishings, the designers looked to a middle ground, aesthetically speaking. “We had clients who leaned more on the traditional side of their personal taste, so they didn’t want a modern mountain home,” notes Blank. Consequently, “we pulled together pieces that felt more transitional. We skirted the living room furniture for a more traditional approach, selected transitional silhouettes and applied unique materials like leather or nubby textures to call back to our mountain surroundings.” Sprinkled in here and there are more rustic elements such as stone and iron that balance out the soft furnishings and light hues: a mix of grays, blues and wintry whites.

Of course, this is a house in the mountains for an active family, so, in deference to that lifestyle, the designers opted for performance fabrics. The choice means that form—and the airiness Mauney and Blank were after—isn’t subservient to function. Case in point: a white sofa in a mountain living room might seem an unusual choice, but tough textiles make it feasible. “It’s been a game-changer,” says Mauney of the new variety of sturdy materials. Besides standing up to normal day-to-day wear and tear, she notes, “In these homes that can get covered in dust, snow and mud, it’s so lovely to be able to offer your clients a lighter palette.”

With its outward orientation, ethereal palette and deceptively tough flourishes, the home speaks to a new way of living in the mountains. “We didn’t want it to feel like these rooms everyone had 20 years ago, where you were not allowed to go in and enjoy,” says Blank. “We wanted it to really speak to having a beautiful space while still feeling you can take care of it.”

Interior designer Erika Blank and designer Kimberly Mauney took a fresh approach to the interiors of this Sun Valley home. In the entry, they balanced the cool, watery hues of the James Cook painting with a custom wood-and-leather console by Sun Valley Woodworks topped with a pair of Currey & Company lamps.

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Minimalism Takes The Lead In A Resort-Like Arizona Mountain Home {Minimalism Takes The Lead In A Resort-Like Arizona Mountain Home} – English

Minimalism Takes The Lead In A Resort-Like Arizona Mountain Home {Minimalism Takes The Lead In A Resort-Like Arizona Mountain Home} – English

The post Minimalism Takes The Lead In A Resort-Like Arizona Mountain Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The couple jumped at the offer. Avid entertainers, the Rollos had always been intrigued by the home’s functionality: The living area, kitchen, entry and patio combined into one open layout ideal for mingling. The stone floors, brick walls, and black doors and windows created a vibe rooted in masculinity that appealed to them. But the couple also wanted to add drama and depth. So they turned to designer Jill Mitchell to do just that.

Originally designed by local architect Tor Stuart, the sprawling residence is perched atop a mountain on 10 acres of unspoiled wilderness. Floor-to-ceiling windows and wall-to-wall retractable doors evoke a floating sensation. “It’s a modern beauty,” says Mitchell, who used the indoor/outdoor architecture as the jumping-off point for Ian and Pedro’s request for a luxurious but livable design that functioned for both everyday life and entertaining.

A minimalist approach became Mitchell’s guiding mantra. “No matter what, we had to preserve the view,” she says. “By going minimal, we could effectively furnish the space while directing the eye outdoors.” In the living area, this meant two oversize, clean-lined custom sofas for ample seating; one of them backless to maintain the sightline outdoors. Clear glass lamps offer ambient light and visual read-through to both the mountain views as well as the landscaping by Chad Norris. “The sun paints incredible colors across the sky at dusk,” says Ian. “Maintaining unobstructed views allows that sunset to be experienced anywhere.”

To add depth and drama, Mitchell painted the walls white to contrast the dark stone and brick. And, because minimalist should never translate to cold, she counteracted the 15-foot ceilings by adding pieces with visual heft, such as the extra-large coffee table that anchors the living area. “Oversize pieces keep the space from feeling cavernous,” she says. Mitchell then utilized metallic accents to emphasize the stone’s warm golden tones. Bold textiles and materials—velvets, shagreen, burnished brass—as well as abstract patterns surprise against the furnishing’s clean lines. “I love mixing the old and the new, combining textiles, adding metals,” says Mitchell. “Each layer ensures that a space looks curated over time.”

It is a lesson in understated luxury, but Mitchell couldn’t forget the other half of the couple’s request: livability. Every piece Mitchell chose is anything but precious. “No one wants to live in a museum,” remarks Pedro. Performance fabrics on the seating defend against red wine spills and muddy paws from the Rollos’ four pooches—Walker, Winston, Watson and Sammy. Dark wool rugs add warmth to stone floors while combating heavy foot traffic.

The main floor is not the only space that’s meant to be enjoyed to the fullest. A downstairs guest suite, complete with its own living room and kitchenette, is more than just a place for guests to retire to—it’s also an additional entertainment area that nods to Pedro’s affinity for modern Italian furniture. A peacock-blue sofa and chaise pair with a cognac leather ottoman to break the neutral color scheme. Nearby, a shuffleboard begs for competition.

For all the carefully curated furnishings, perhaps the main bedroom is what hosts the pièce de résistance: a Poltrona Frau Volare canopy bed by Italian designer Roberto Lazzeroni. Pedro has pined for it since youth. “I’ve loved it forever, and I finally found its home,” says Pedro. “Being that it’s both framed and open, it reflects the bedroom’s indoor/outdoor vibe perfectly.”

That bedroom, like every space on the main floor looks out on the covered patio—the couple’s favorite space. Here, sheltered in the privacy of the canyon walls, Pedro and Ian dine alfresco, relax on the swings and swim in the infinity pool. The house is exactly what they thought it could be. Says Ian, “It’s our own little resort.”

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For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

Sometimes a fresh start is exactly what’s needed. That was the conclusion of a young Denver couple after years of maintaining an older dwelling in the Washington Park neighborhood left them desiring more ease at home. By sheer coincidence, a new house was being built nearby and the idea of a move that didn’t mean saying goodbye to friends and neighbors was too good to refuse. The couple took the leap and relocated, bringing their longtime designer, Katie Schroder, along for the ride.

The home that caught their eye was designed as a contemporary take on the traditional Craftsman style. Working with architect Kathy Eichelberger Jones, Schroder was able to tailor the under-construction home to the clients with custom finishes and the addition of a playroom between the sons’ bedrooms, but the overriding mandate was to make the space warm and inviting. “The main goal was that this house be livable,” says Schroder. “They wanted a kid- friendly, dog-friendly house that looks beautiful, but where you aren’t afraid to sit down and relax.”

This was not the first interiors rodeo for Schroder and the couple. The husband (a software engineer) and the wife (a social worker) had also hired her to redesign their previous home. “By this time, I knew them very well, so working together was second nature,” says the designer. But that didn’t mean Schroder didn’t have surprises in store. “Katie can envision how best to use a space and, like us, she has two boys and she understands the needs of a family,” says the wife. “But she also knows how to nudge you out of your comfort zone.”

In this case, those style nudges mainly dealt with the color palette. The designer (whose firm’s motto is “color, pattern, culture”) notes that “this couple has a very British sense of color but viewed through a Colorado lens.” With that in mind, Schroder decided that although the house they left behind was done in shades of green, a new blue hue was required. “She practically fired green,” jokes the wife, who is now a blue convert. But this is far from a monochromatic interior. “You can’t have only blue in a house,” says Schroder, who encouraged the couple to consider a lively palette. That design philosophy is on display in the dining room, where a burnished-yellow ceiling floats above a gray wallpaper with a yellow branch pattern, and in the master bedroom done in many shades of purple and green.

But it was the living room rug that ultimately charted the color course, bringing in purple, green and orange to join blue. “I was chicken about some things,” admits the wife. “When I said I thought the rug had too much coral, Katie showed me how it would work. That’s why a designer is important.” For Schroder, it’s those votes of confidence that are key to a successful design. “In fashion, people have been given permission to mix patterns to create a boho look, and I think they’re starting to want that more in their homes now, too,” she says. “These clients trusted me, and that kind of trust is important if you want to create an extraordinary interior.”

The designer says that whimsy also played a role here as well, especially in the light fixtures. Rather than choosing a traditional chandelier for the dining room, for example, she opted for a pair of “cool, spidery lights that add a modern twist.” And in the powder room, she skipped typical sconces for the surprise of a curvaceous brass library light over the vanity. “This is a house where the fun little details add up to something great,” Schroder says.

It turns out the new home was a fit in unexpected ways. “At first we thought the house might be too big, but we use every inch,” says the wife. With everyone working and attending school at home, the husband uses the office, the older son uses the bonus room, the youngest son sits at the dining table and the wife is stationed in the breakfast nook. Even the dogs have their go-to spaces, one claiming the back of the sofa and the other a cozy niche below the stairs. The home’s basement level was intended to do double duty as a play and study area for the kids, but the pandemic has changed everyone’s needs and it now serves handily as an entertainment space for the whole family. “With all of us at home, including the boys and dogs, our home has to be livable. But Katie has also made it special,” says the wife. “We are very happy here.” Proof that change can be for the better.

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In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

The post In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Designer Ramey Caulkins knows some birthday presents are better than others. When her client (who is also a friend) called and said that what she most wanted for her 50th birthday was to completely redo her house, Caulkins was happy to help make her wish come true. “She lives in a stunning vintage home in one of Denver’s most beautiful old neighborhoods, but I would say that she had never really occupied her house like she wanted to, because she hadn’t furnished it as her own,” says Caulkins. “Her gift to herself was recreating it in a way that felt like an expression of who she is as a person.”

The home, a 1912 Spanish Colonial, had captured the client’s heart because of its unique bones: original leaded-glass windows, high ceilings, beautiful arched doorways and intricate millwork in every room. “They don’t make houses like they once did,” says the wife. “I fell for this one because every room seemed to have a story, but it wasn’t until Ramey came along that the furnishings came to life. She was able to edit each room to its simplest form and thoughtfully weave in all these unique layers of subtle color, texture and pattern.”

For the last 10 years, architect Stephen P. Ekman has worked with the owners on the house, restoring the exterior and improving the floor plan. In the latest iteration, he and Caulkins worked together to bring new luster to some of the home’s original interior details. “The goal was to create a cohesive style through the entire house, architecturally and interior design-wise,” says Caulkins. “We began with a spatial plan to figure out how they truly wanted to live in—and use—the house. Because the clients love to entertain, we needed to create plenty of seating areas. And because we were creating better flow between the rooms, we had to make visual connections with color and design elements so that the house would feel cohesive.”

The entryway announces the home’s new aesthetic, a marriage of old and new. Ekman removed layers of white paint from the stairwell to return the handrail and balusters to their original glory. “The feature is unusual and beautiful,” says Ekman. “And now it really shines.” Caulkins brought modernity to the entryway by wrapping the walls in an ethereal cherry blossom wallcovering that feels almost like an art installation in the light- filled space.

In the living room, Ekman designed a new, ornate fireplace mantel that has everyone believing it is original to the house, and Caulkins enveloped the space with paper-backed, oyster-colored fabric by Schumacher to soften and warm the large room. She took design cues from the homeowner’s heirloom rug and layered in patterns and subtle colors that complement its hues.

A sun room that the clients rarely entered has been transformed into an oft-used living space. “This may be one of my favorite rooms I’ve ever done,” says Caulkins, who covered its stamped concrete floor with hexagon-shaped Ann Sacks tile and oriented a cozy sofa and a pair of caned chairs around a bronze drum table to create a proper seating area. Ekman restored the barrel-vaulted ceiling, which now wears new paint to highlight its unique lines. The subtle textures and colors allow the original windows to take center stage.

A new spirit also infuses the dining room. “When you have beautiful bones like this in a house, you want your design choices to highlight them and not take too much attention away,” says Caulkins. Ekman and his team revived the distinctive molding in the room, and the designer oversaw the upholstering of the ceiling above the table in a fabric that looks almost like a watercolor mural. “It lifts the eye and exposes the intricacies of the millwork that may have gotten lost if we’d simply painted it all white,” she notes.

For Caulkins, the goal was an enduring style. “I really strive to design in a way that is timeless rather than trendy. I’m all about the layers and creating something that feels like it’s been slowly curated with a unique mix of old and new. That’s even more fun to do when I have architecture like this to inspire me.”

For the client, the house now feels like an extension of her personality, which is what she had always wanted. She says, “It’s a very personal house with unique touches, layers and details that tell a lovely story. I’ve fallen for my house all over again.”

 

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A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

The post A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


As a professional couple with young kids were building their family home in the Wash Park, Colorado, neighborhood, they found themselves facing a dilemma: whether to go with sophisticated and polished interiors or keep practicality at the forefront of their plans, since the spaces would have to stand up to their active children. As it turned out, they didn’t have to choose between the two. Their design team promised that they could have both by meeting in the middle, and that’s exactly what they did. “They wanted the house to work for the whole family,” says designer Ashley Larson Eitemiller.

“The homeowners were looking for a large family room for entertaining and for the kids, and a large, wraparound bar that would be open to the kitchen, dining and great rooms,” says residential designer Jim Gunther. Adds Eitemiller, “A lot of activities can happen at once in that open, communal space.”

The home was designed specifically for how the family lives, with various “stowaway spots” they can use as they come and go. “They’re bringing in strollers and all of the attendant kid items,” Gunther says, “so there are multiple areas with organized storage in the home’s front, back and side so they don’t have to carry things all the way through the house, and the open space can stay neat and organized.”

Function meets style with wood elements like corbels, beams and rough-sawn cedar that brings in the casual, Colorado mountain vibe the family loves. “The darker wood beams contrast with the caramel floors, making all the wood really stand out,” Eitemiller says. The couple’s art collection, which includes lots of landscape imagery, also offers a nod to the home’s Colorado aesthetic.

While cool gray color palettes have been wildly popular recently, the homeowners desired more warmth in their home. “They wanted tones that would make the house feel very homey and comfortable, and they were open to jewel colors,” says Eitemiller. “Every space has some element of blue, whether it’s a deep navy, a brighter blue or a beautiful smoky gray-blue. We also brought in some neutral grays, a honey caramel and a nice plum color.”

Layers of texture give the spaces dimension and visual interest. “Throughout, there’s a mix of leather, natural linen and mohair. The carpets are wool, and there are sheers on the windows that allow light in while also offering privacy,” Eitemiller says. “Every room has details designed to visually pull you through the house, such as the wallpaper in the front entry and ceiling beams in the main living spaces.”

Furnishings are stylish yet tough enough for a young family. In the living room, a pair of sofas in camel-colored leather marry beauty and durability, as do refined fiberglass Stone Yard coffee tables. “It looks well put together, but you don’t have to be monitoring everything that’s going on in the house,” says Eitemiller. “We also used Sunbrella outdoor fabric inside, which adds durability.”

One of the primary requirements for this home was to have designated spaces where kids can just take over and play. “Right now, the sun room is used for the kiddos, and it’s a great space right off of the living room and kitchen area,” Eitemiller says. “The children can be playing in that room while their parents are cooking dinner.” There’s also a dedicated playroom upstairs near the bedrooms, and a spacious gymnastics area and playroom downstairs that is designed with no beams or poles to get in the way of the fun.

The family also has a large yard, with plenty of grass for the kids to run around on, as well as exterior entertaining spaces for adults. “The homeowners like to have friends and family over,” says general contractor Patrick Englund. “In the backyard, they have a trellis with heaters above and an exterior fireplace.”

Having come from a home that wasn’t functioning well for them, the family is now enjoying the perfect balance between adult style and kid-friendly design, with fluid spaces for family life and special spots just for playtime. Meanwhile, the home’s interior spaces honor Colorado’s rugged style while giving it modern sensibility.

“We wanted the family to feel comfortable, so they could really live in the house,” says Eitemiller. “They wanted a relaxed, well-designed home that could be used to its fullest without the fear of it being damaged easily. A mountain Colorado feel—but a little bit more refined.”

The post A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

The post Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


In 1928, architect Burnham Hoyt—a Denver native—designed a storybook brick Tudor in what is now a historic neighborhood in his hometown. One of five notable architects contributing to Denver’s City Beautiful movement of that era, Hoyt incorporated Jacobean, English Norman and French Provincial elements into the home’s design. Nearly a century later, a modern-day couple with three kids fell in love with the home’s history, style and location—but not its 1970s addition.

That expansion had left the home with some troublesome quirks the new occupants wanted to address. “The family room didn’t relate to the house and backyard, and there were many unnecessary little rooms,” says architect Steve Ekman, who worked with designer Peggy Robbins Bender and general contractor Doug Canady to restore and renovate the residence. “The new owners wanted to make this home their urban oasis.” They also wanted to preserve its historic details, which thrilled Ekman, a former trustee for Historic Denver. His team dug up the original architectural plans and photos at the Denver Public Library. “I have a historian on staff and he loves to do research,” Ekman says. “It’s sort of like archaeology for a house.”

General contractor Doug Canady restored the home’s exterior—and many interior elements—to its former glory. “There was so much work to be done—we cleaned the stone and the brick to bring out the old details,” says Ekman. “Doug did a great job of making the exterior sing.” Inside, the original living room, dining room and hallways were preserved but the additions at the rear of the house were removed to start fresh with more spacious, functional rooms.

Ekman’s team worked with Bender—one of their many collaborations—to create livable spaces that would accommodate contemporary furnishings. When styling the interiors, Bender let the home’s finishes lead the way. “The beautiful thing about a Tudor is the texture,” she says. “The palette is about rough-hewn timbers, stone and wood. There is a lot of warmth in the wood, and blue is a nice foil—so we pulled a lot of blues in with fabrics.”

Bender also incorporated playful patterns and splashes of color. In the entryway—where classic timbers, plaster and brickwork abound—she placed an elegant armchair upholstered with a head-turning fuchsia print. A few coats of soft gray paint freshened up the dark and dated wood-paneled dining room while at the same time helping to create a visual transition between the original part of the house and the new addition. “We found this great antique Jacobean-style sideboard that really adds detail to the room,” Bender says. In the living room, the timbers remain as they were, giving the room a cozy feel. With three kids and the family’s St. Bernard, Rufus, running around, the room offers an “away” space for the couple, with a drawing room feel. “It has the only original wood-burning fireplace,” Bender says.

The new great room is the family gathering spot. At one end, a Marvin accordion door folds back to link the space to the yard. Bender says the challenge with historic renovations is thoughtfully updating a home to make it functional. “A folding door—such a modern notion—seems like an unlikely fit for a Tudor great room, but it works,” she says. That door plus a host of new windows lend the formerly inward-facing home a strong connection to the outdoors. “The landscape is a huge part of this project,” Bender says. “You can’t have everything opening out without having something fabulous to open up to.”

Landscape designer Paul Wrona delivered by creating a lush, soothing garden. “We planted roses as the foreground for ornamental grasses,” he says. “We wanted wisteria to grow up the pergola and used a lot of grasses and a mix of perennial colors so there’s something blooming at all times.” Wrona also custom designed a swimming pool, as well as an outdoor dining area and a lounging spot. A 12-foot privacy wall was added to screen a new office building behind the property, and gently bubbling water features mask any traffic noise while also being lovely to look at.

The once labyrinthian home now suits the needs of the family while maintaining its old-world Tudor elegance. Ekman says: “The homeowner tells us that it functions so well, they are entertaining a lot more—they even had the husband’s company Christmas party here. It’s opened up their world.”

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