Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You {Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You} – English

Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You {Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You} – English

The post Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Photo courtesy Monacelli

For many years, forward-thinking architects have been reimagining the Rocky Mountain vernacular, adapting its traditional forms and rustic, regional materials to the cleaner lines of modernist design. Yet surprisingly few books have captured the resulting private residences.

In Rocky Mountain Modern: Contemporary Alpine Homes, published this summer by Monacelli, veteran design journalist John Gendall does just that. The 18 modern residences highlighted here cover the remarkable expanse of the 3,000-mile-long Rocky Mountains—from a ridgetop home near Canmore, Alberta, to a ranch house at the foot of New Mexico’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

By including seven homes across Colorado, Gendall shines a spotlight on the state’s booming design scene. From projects by powerhouse firms Rowland+Broughton, CCY Architects or even the one-woman studio of Renée del Gaudio Architecture, the houses featured in this tome demonstrate modernism’s affinity not just for dramatic landscapes, but for some of the harshest environmental conditions in the West.

Cover of Rocky Mountain Modern book featuring a home in a field with mountain views

Photo courtesy Monacelli

The post Calling All Mountain Modern Lovers: This Book Is For You appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver {Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver} – English

Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver {Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver} – English

The post Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Carrie Hudak’s home wouldn’t look out of place in Palm Springs, California, which makes it an anomaly considering its location: central Denver. The just-over-5,000-square-foot midcentury modern dwelling is tucked amid dozens of traditional 1920s and ’30s residences more typical of historic Cheesman Park. With a front façade punctuated by just a few slender floor-to-ceiling windows and a vine-covered wall concealing much of the house and yard from the street—thus furthering its mystique—this is an abode that invites curiosity.

Carrie herself had long been intrigued by it. So when the property came on the market, she snapped it up. She picked up on its potential at first sight, but also noted plenty of spaces ripe for improvement, including an oddly laid-out kitchen with an island set at a diagonal, dated bathrooms and a sea of mismatched concrete-and-brick pavers in the courtyard. A renovation challenge was far from daunting, however, thanks to a bona fide ace up Carrie’s sleeve: her sister, interior designer Amy Casey.

To tackle the renovation, they called on architect Katrina Eckelhoff and builder Christine Regis, both of whom had worked on Carrie’s previous residence. Eckelhoff noticed the home’s charms right away. “It just had a good feeling when you walked in,” she recalls. Built as a small two-bedroom in 1959, the property was expanded in the ’60s into its current U-shaped layout. Studying the house’s subsequent renovations, the architect could see where previous owners had attempted to fix some of its awkward corners. It helped her identify new ways to improve the dwelling’s flow without altering its floor plan. “She had all these subtle ideas that turned out to be game changers,” comments Carrie.

Together, Eckelhoff, Casey and Regis envisioned how to transform this abode into the best version of itself. To retain some of its midcentury character, they opted to keep the original parquet floors and floor-to-ceiling glass windows, but the bathrooms and kitchen were stripped down to the studs and some partitions between the rooms removed. For the interiors, Casey also drew inspiration from an unlikely place: Carrie’s career as a geologist. Her knowledge of rocks and stones is highlighted throughout the home, from varying surfaces on countertops to decorative accents here and there, including a huge statement slab behind the primary bathroom’s freestanding tub. Individual stones are also displayed around the house. (“When you’re a geologist, people can’t resist gifting you rocks,” Carrie jokes.) The owner’s taste in art hints at her interest in Earth’s history, too, with photographs of the sea and several landscapes adorning the walls. A nature-inspired palette complements the scene, with, for instance, forest-green accents in the primary bedroom and botanical wallpapers in the children’s bathrooms creating an organic, resort-inspired vibe.

A walnut paneled wall in the lounge area off the main living room caused one of the few moments of disagreement between the sisters. The interior designer was initially inclined to take it out, but Carrie felt she’d miss the warmth of the original wood. Casey found a compromise by working it into her design scheme: She eventually loved it paired with the room’s blacks, whites and grays, and sourced similar-toned woods for the built-in breakfast table and to panel the kitchen island.

Outside, the team worked with landscape architect Dave Johnson to refresh the walled yard without moving any major elements. Casey’s idea of an outdoor seating area around a fireplace just beyond the interior living room created a stronger indoor-outdoor connection, all the while providing a better view than the garage wall. The existing pool received a face-lift complete with a new hot tub. And after a lot of jackhammering, the dated pavers were replaced with flagstone stepping-stones for a modern, streamlined look. Ensconced in what now feels like a private oasis, Carrie’s children, aged 10 and 12, and her husband, Charley, never feel cooped up.

But what makes the home truly special is the comfortable collaboration that went into it. “It was me, my sister and a female architect and builder too—a real ‘woman power’ team and pleasant experience,” Carrie recalls with a smile. “Ultimately, Amy took my concepts and amped them up in a good way. I’m glad I followed her advice, because this is now such a pleasant place to live.”

The post Peek Inside A Rare Midcentury Modern Gem In Central Denver appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom {Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom} – English

Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom {Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom} – English

The post Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

beige mirror and sofa against grey wall displayed in furnishings showroom

PHOTO COURTESY COEUR CABINET + CURATED INTERIORS

As director of interiors for Denver-based Ruggles Mabe Studio, designer Emily Lindemann takes a holistic approach to her work, marrying architectural details and luxurious finishes to create rooms with timeless style. “Giving clients an integrated experience has always been important to us, and we wanted to expand that,” she says. So, when the opportunity arose to create a tactile showroom experience, she embraced it. Called Coeur after the French word for “heart,” the Washington Park studio offers fine custom and semi-custom cabinetry, interior design services, and a selection of new and found home furnishings and accessories. coeurinteriors.com

What’s Coeur’s niche in the Denver design market? We’ve seen a surge in requests for smaller renovations, and Coeur focuses on that scale of project. If a client just wants to redo their powder room, we can help.

Why is cabinetry such an integral part of your offerings? I think it’s absolutely essential to have good cabinetry in your home. It’s something you touch every single day and always a big line item in the budget, so it’s crucial to get it right. That’s why we wanted to partner with Plato Woodwork—they get it.

What are the possibilities for custom cabinetry? Plato is really innovative with their materials, and while they offer classic, solid-wood cabinetry, they’re always pushing the envelope with everything from beautiful textured woods to doors inlaid with brass.

Can you describe the other home goods Coeur offers? We’ve curated antiques, new furnishings, a custom upholstery collection, and we’ve brought in lighting, candle and apothecary lines. I look for pieces that tell a story. Everything is very warm, textural and organic.

The post Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

The post Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Hotel appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Exterior of hotel in Aspen with wood siding

Travelers ready to return to Aspen’s slopes have a sophisticated new lodging option to consider this year.

Aspen Street Lodge offers the look and feel of a private home with amenities that only a luxury hotel can offer, from a resident chef and mountain guide to painting sessions with acclaimed Aspen artist Kelly Peters.

Designed by local architecture firm Forum Phi and built by Madigan + Company, the eco-conscious building—located on the central-Aspen site previously occupied by the Hotel Lenado—is clad with stone and charred cedar chosen to mimic the bark of aspen trees.

Inside, designer Debra Owens gave the nine lodge rooms, two-bedroom penthouse apartment and intimate common spaces a “modern industrial feel with a luxe twist,” she says, by juxtaposing white Venetian plaster walls against warm wood and blackened-steel finishes, and clean-lined furnishings by Poliform, Holly Hunt, Liaigre and Cassina with chunky fabrics, shearlings and leathers.

Sculptural lighting from Apparatus, Roll & Hill and RBW illuminates artful wallcoverings, including hand-painted Porter Teleo designs, “creating a tactile and visually stunning place to relax and recharge,” Owens says. For its first full ski season, the lodge will offer full buyouts only.

PHOTO BY DRAPER WHITE, COURTESY ASPEN STREET LODGE

The post Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Hotel appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In a house like this, everything is in service to nature and that view, and informed by it as well,” says designer Kimille Taylor of the Telluride abode she and architect Steve Morton, who also happens to be her husband, recently completed for a couple who divide their time between Colorado and Arizona. Together with general contractor Paul Ricks, Taylor and Morton crafted a residence that respects its extraordinary setting and frames mountain vistas from every room. Inside, spaces are airy yet cozy and cater to the owners’ favorite pastimes: painting, woodworking, reading and cooking.

“The clients wanted an exciting plan for a clean, contemporary dwelling with glass walls that open to the outdoors,” notes Morton. Situated on the north side of the valley, it made sense to extend the house wide, like outstretched wings, to take in southerly views and sunshine. The resulting shape “felt like it wanted to take flight,” says the architect, who nicknamed the house “Soaring Eagle.” “The home’s forms mimic a large wingspan and a tail section, and the raised center intersection can be viewed as the head,” he explains. “The perspective and views afforded by the site feel like soaring above the ground below.” Without knowing it, he tapped into a spirit already captured in the couple’s art collection. Serendipitously, hanging in their Arizona home was a large Rebecca Kinkead painting of a soaring bald eagle. “Needless to say, it’s been relocated to Telluride,” adds Morton.

“The house has low-slung, horizontal lines—it’s bold in its simplicity,” the architect continues. “I tend to pare down ornamentation and create something more poetic and understated.” Morton is also driven by “a responsibility to respect nature,” and wrapped the home in silvery-hued stone and cedar siding. Adding integrated planters around the structure offered additional thermal benefits, and tufted-grass plantings visually nestle the dwelling into the land. “It treads lightly, and it has a quiet strength,” he says. Because the clients wanted “an edited style,” Morton worked closely with Taylor to select exterior materials that could continue inside for a cohesive feel. “The result is a soft, warm materiality,” he notes.

“These clients didn’t want to be limited by anything cliché,” says Taylor, who divides her practice between Manhattan and Telluride. “You see a lot of the same things in the mountain decorating world, so we wanted something fresh.” For an element of fun, she found a living room coffee table composed of a glass top that rests on cedar “boulders,” some of which are movable. “It brings a bit of wit to the space,” she says. Organic forms also inspired the table Taylor created for the dining room. “It’s sculptural and breaks up the rectilinear forms of that main living area,” the designer explains.

More uncommon pieces were discovered during marathon shopping trips in Manhattan. “They’d come to New York, and I’d take them out from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. We spent many days like that, and it was such fun,” says Taylor. As a result, the home contains pieces from Liaigre and Apparatus mixed with unique finds from local shops. All these pieces exist against a varied palette. “There are probably 15 different colors present—shades of blue, gray, stone, cream, parchment, camel, brown, taupe and a little maroon,” notes the designer. “This complexity is what makes it successful, along with a lot of textural layering.”

To fulfill the couple’s wish list, Taylor and Morton created two primary suites flanking the public areas (one for the clients and one for his daughter) and additional guest rooms downstairs. They also designed an art studio and a woodshop, as well as a library loft. But it’s the kitchen that anchors the house. “It had to work,” stresses Taylor. “They love to cook, bake and entertain, so we took a long time perfecting the space’s functionality.” An exposed stone wall not only creates continuity with the exterior, but also imbues the space with a sense of age—the kind the designer says you find in old Italian dwellings.

“Everything adds up to their overall quality of life here,” Taylor observes. And when the glass doors open to the fresh air and sunshine—even in winter—the house truly does seem to soar.

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

The post Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

There’s something almost primordially comforting about living in the mountains. In the quiet seclusion of the surrounding landscape, time seems to slow down so one can truly savor moments of laughter and joy, swapping stories by the fire. This is what Craig and Mariah Morris craved most for their Aspen home. Though they love the contemporary structure—with its bright, voluminous rooms and expansive windows that perfectly capture views of the awe-inspiring mountainside—they also craved something more intimate and cozier. They turned to designers Joe McGuire and Matthew Tenzin to cultivate close-knit gathering spaces perfect for cocktail hours and family dinners.

Originally built in 1977, the mountain abode was renovated in 2019 by the previous owner into its sleek statement of glass and sunlight, made in consultation with architect Scot Broughton. In their work, McGuire and Tenzin especially delight in making such grand contemporary structures feel welcoming and human-centric. “People seem to be drawn to us to create cozy interiors in these types of spaces,” notes McGuire. “We balance the architecture and complement it, so it doesn’t feel cold and stark.”

The home already provided an inspiring canvas for the designers to explore, and they found able partners in general contractors Thaddeus Eshelman and Jimmy Terui, who also oversaw the 2019 renovation. Collaborating on the new customizations with McGuire and Tenzin “was the bow on the present,” notes Terui. “All of their final touches really put it over the top.” Together, they focused on incorporating new finishes that would add more visual weight to the interior’s broad white walls and pale oak flooring. The abode featured black metal-framed windows and ceiling box beams that cut through the light and airy spaces, and the designers emphasized this juxtaposition by adding a few bolder finishes, such as staining the kitchen cabinetry in a deep ebony hue. The rich color “gives some structure and energy to the space, so it’s not just neutrals,” Tenzin explains.

To temper the angularity of the architecture, the designers introduced some curved elements to the interiors. “Right now, we have this desire for softer lines, yet still done in a very contemporary way,” says Tenzin. This was the guiding principle behind selecting the new furnishings and accents: all are unequivocally modern in silhouette, but never too sharp or sleek. Chairs and sofas have rounded backs and arms softened with tactile materials like shearling, wool and saddle leather. Mixing abstract designs with traditional Moroccan weaves, “the rugs are also really special, as they add a lot of comfort and interest,” says McGuire. The couple’s bedroom in particular is a study in tactile layering, with an upholstered bed frame, a fabric-paneled wall and artful Apparatus sconces featuring wefts of horsehair. “Textures were a key part of adding in that warmth to the home,” notes Tenzin about their overall approach.

The designers also kept everything within an organic palette borrowed from the surrounding mountain woodland to create cohesion. “Golden tones from the aspens, amber tones from the scrub oaks and greens from the evergreens all filter in through the house,” notes Tenzin. And in the couple’s serene main bedroom “there’s a little bit of a lavender hue that relates to the lavender and sage that grow so beautifully here in Colorado.” Artwork introduces more personal and playful notes of color, like the specially commissioned comic book-inspired piece by artist Nelson De La Nuez, which serves as a touching reference to the couple’s love story.

A self-confessed lighting fanatic, Tenzin was particularly passionate about how they would illuminate the home. Style wise, materials ranged from minimalist black metal to delicate amber glass globes. But “it was also really important for us to find LED fixtures that get warm as you dim them,” he explains. “It’s so critical for creating the right vibe.” These technical details are very much like “the difference between gray, cool lighting, which makes everybody look like a ghost, and that beautiful candlelit feel where everyone looks glamorous,” adds McGuire.

Nestled in this soft glow and laden with lush textures, the dwelling now feels more approachable. And for the designers, there’s nothing better than infusing soulfulness into such shiny, modern spaces. As McGuire says, “When you can walk in and see the family truly relaxing in their own home, that’s a feeling of success for us.”

The post Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

The post Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Rendering of a dining room and adjacent living room with mountain views.

The recent debut of Altus Vail, a luxurious 15-residence property adjacent to Vail Village, was a major milestone for the mountain enclave, which hasn’t seen a significant new development in 10 years. And it couldn’t have come at a better time: In 2020, just as demand for residential real estate in the valley soared, inventory dropped to historic lows. Altus’ offerings look and live like single-family homes with an intimate setting and private 8-foot-deep balconies accessed via retractable sliding doors that facilitate indoor-outdoor living—and dramatic mountain and ski-run views.

Designed by Denver-based architecture firm 359 Design with interiors by OCG’s Kellye O’Kelly, the mountain-contemporary dwellings also offer finishes not often seen in multifamily developments, from quartz-clad kitchens with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances to stone fireplaces inlaid with sleek metal accents. But it’s the rare single-family home that offers this kind of access—the Golden Peak and Vail Village base areas are both just a short walk away.

PHOTO COURTESY ALTUS VAIL

The post Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List {Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List} – English

Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List {Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List} – English

The post Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Wood shelves filled with plants, sculptures, candles and perfume.

Mother-daughter duo Betsy and Megan Jamison have always had an eye for beauty. Before launching Littleton home-goods and luxury floral boutique Conservatrice in 2015, Betsy worked as a professional photographer and interior decorator, while Megan was a pastry chef with a knack for floral design.

With their current creative outlet—housed in a charming storefront on Littleton’s historic Main Street—the pair have indulged their taste for the unusual and dramatic. “We love abundance and old-world European styling; decadent paintings and English gardens inspire us,” says Megan, who channels these themes into romantic floral designs that incorporate seasonal and locally grown blooms.

In addition to custom and pre-designed bouquets, the duo offers houseplants of all sizes, along with an assortment of ceramic pots and planters in styles that range from simple to timeworn. “We’re always on the lookout for quirky vessels,” Megan says. “We don’t like pigeonholes or relying on a certain genre,” Betsy adds. “Conservatrice means curator in French, and we thrive on surprising our customers with everything from candles and textiles and interesting wall art to stacks of pots and lovely smelling hand creams. Our aim is to guide customers to discover what they love, because when you collect what you’re drawn to, it always works.”

PHOTO COURTESY CONSERVATRICE

The post Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

The post An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Today, while sitting at the grand piano in this Denver home’s dark-walled study, the musically inclined family members residing here look over a rolling, park-like garden dotted with tall trees, tranquil fountains, and areas for relaxing and play.

It’s a far cry from the day when architect Carlos Alvarez and designer Carolyn Morris first saw the dwelling. “Back then, there was no rear garden to speak of, and the home was designed to look inward,” says the architect.

Everything changed when a large adjoining lot came up for sale and the owners (a couple with school-age children) snapped it up. Suddenly, the house was open to a multitude of exciting new possibilities. “They went from a small lawn to a giant garden,” notes Alvarez. “Now there were options. We looked at several, including adding a large addition to the house, but we decided to shift the interior perspective 100 percent to look outside to the new backyard.”

To embrace the lush setting designed by landscape architects Adam Hallauer and Collin Bentley, Alvarez and Morris—partners in business and life—worked with designer Emily Young Alford and general contractor Dave Mosely to gut the home for a fresh start. In addition to making way for a modern interior aesthetic and erasing a confusing layout, starting from scratch gave the team an opportunity to open the rear walls to the garden with a series of large windows and floor-to-ceiling folding doors. The reimagined layout focuses on social events both large and small and seems to draw visitors outside where an architectural pavilion that’s crisscrossed by iron girders awaits.

From the front door, the new story unfolds beginning with a geometric floor composed of taupe travertine and charcoal marble. “The entry is large and very tall, so we created a patterned floor that grounds the space and makes it feel cozier,” says Morris. “Plus, it introduces the clean and modern palette.” Visitors will note another design motif here with a 50-foot wall of rift-cut white oak paneling that runs the length of the first floor. “It’s something like the spinal cord of the home. It’s also warm, organic and modern,” notes Morris. But this is not a feature that’s solely about form—it also contains storage and screens a set of elevator doors.

The main floor is dedicated to the social needs of the family. “They wanted spaces for different types of gatherings,” explains the architect. “There’s a large kitchen with a distinct dining island and a banquette-surrounded table for the family, a separate dining room for entertaining, a formal living room, a family room and a multipurpose room that serves as a study and a music room.”

Upper floors are for family, with one level reserved for the kids and another dedicated
to adult spaces for work and relaxation. “We changed the circulation on the second and third floors. On the kids’ level there’s now room for a lounge in addition to the bedrooms. On the parents’ floor there’s a more luxurious primary suite with room for an office and individual closets,” says Alvarez. Morris adds, “Having private work and play spaces for adults and kids is perfect for a family. They can retreat for privacy or come together to share interests.”

Whether rooms are for individual or group pursuits, Morris gave them an enfolding nature. “I wanted to wrap each room in a distinct material, such as wood or fabric,” she says. “This softened the backgrounds, making great backdrops for the sculptural furniture we selected. Each piece is very intentional and edited, which results in a graphic composition.” That purposeful nature was applied to every element of the house. “The design team created unusual detailing that required ingenuity to build,” notes Mosely. “We worked closely together to make it a reality.” Alvarez recalls the large amount of time and care that went into the smallest features, noting how he worked with Mike Scott of 5280 Custom Cabinetry on elements such as the minimal handles on the pocket doors and the seamless paneling. The labor was not lost on the clients. “These are people who put a lot of thought into things,” Morris says. “They appreciate features that are well done.”

Today, whether relaxing beside the hearth in the living room or lounging by the outdoor fireplace on the pavilion, the family enjoys the sophisticated and serene nature of their new home. “If I used one word to describe the house, I’d choose ‘peaceful,’” says Morris. “It’s a very restful environment.”

The post An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream {These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream} – English

These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream {These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream} – English

The post These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Rendering of a linear condominium building in the desert

Not everyone believes in second chances. But for anyone who missed out on the 30 Ascent Golf Villas released in mid-February, now is the time to check out the latest from Ascent: 40 luxury condominiums enclosed within a sleek, linear building at the base of Camelback Mountain in Arizona.

The Mountainside Residences offer bespoke design features such as Bulthaup kitchens, two-color palettes that integrate natural materials, and freestanding sculptural soaking tubs in the main baths. And residents will enjoy access to the adjacent Mountain Club, too. This private club is modeled on the historic Jokake Inn, which still stands on the resort grounds. With its rustic wood beams and adobe façade, the club serves as an oasis where residents can pursue wellness and simply relax.

PHOTO COURTESY THE ASCENT AT THE PHOENICIAN

The post These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.