Channel The Harmonious Feeling Present At This Lake Tahoe Escape {Channel The Harmonious Feeling Present At This Lake Tahoe Escape} – English

Channel The Harmonious Feeling Present At This Lake Tahoe Escape {Channel The Harmonious Feeling Present At This Lake Tahoe Escape} – English

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As a central element, water endows the modern dwelling with the quality of an oasis. It’s introduced at the front door with a cubist fountain and a rock-lined pool that ripples from the front to the back underneath a long, glass-sided hallway. In the backyard, the lap pool is mere steps away from the living area and is a frequent gathering spot for the family. “They wanted this home to feel like a retreat, and celebrating the concept of water helps make that happen,” says Walton. “Wherever you are in the house, you can glimpse water.”

It’s fitting, then, that the glass passageway seems to float between the black metal-clad portions of the dwelling, which contain the living and dining areas and the main bedroom suite. According to Walton, the hall provides a transition that’s both practical and soulful. “Walking down it to the bedroom, you have a feeling of lightness,” says the architect. “There’s the sense of going to a space that’s quiet and removed, a place where you can relax.”

The concepts sound lofty, and that was the intent. “This project took a few years to construct,” says general contractor Eben Schreiber. “The clients have a great understanding of design and architecture, and they were meticulous—and that’s a good thing. Their appreciation of quality shows in the details of this house.” Walton calls out the stairway composed of floating treads and a rail that resembles a wide, unbroken ribbon of metal as one of those defining features. “The treads and the articulation of the rail, they speak to the whole dark-light, floating-grounded contrast found throughout the house,” she notes.

Working closely with Walton on the interior architecture, designer Alexandra Loew staged a balancing act herself. The designer, who completed the couple’s primary residence in the southern part of the state, kicked off this project by asking them how they wanted to feel in this home. Their answer was distilled to a single word: harmonious. To engender that feeling here, the designer started by studying the architecture of places of peace around the world, looking at everything from temples to meditation spaces for inspiration. Her goal was to create a sense of tranquility while embracing the husband’s appreciation of minimalism and the wife’s enjoyment of cozy spaces. “They gravitate to black and white tones, so we have a lot of those,” says Loew. “But we’ve added in many textures and finishes that give the spaces a tactile quality. The linen-and-silk carpets, the weathered wood of some rustic antiques and the embossed leathers in this home give it a warm, earthy and inviting nature.”

Operating on the idea that peace is hard to achieve with the presence of visual clutter, Loew worked with Henrybuilt to create the kitchen cabinetry, the bedroom closet systems, the bathroom vanities and the mudroom and ski lockers. “There is a sense in this house of everything being in its place,” she explains. “This is a family for whom physical decluttering leads to mental decluttering, so well-considered storage was necessary for moments of creativity and repose.” With the elements of everyday life behind a door or in a drawer and a soothing color palette in place, the designer was able to highlight what she calls the home’s finest art. “The most important artwork here is the view,” Loew notes. “The landscape is an ever-changing, always beautiful canvas.”

This family plans to enjoy the retreat and its landscape for many years to come. “There were two things that were really important to these clients: the feeling of harmony and refinement they wanted to create here and the fact that this is a forever home they want to leave their children,” says Loew. “All of us understood this is a legacy project.” And, like all good legacies, it is meant to be as enduring and timeless as the mountains that surround it.

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Meet The Denver Designer Who’s Rethinking Mountain Interiors {Meet The Denver Designer Who’s Rethinking Mountain Interiors} – English

Meet The Denver Designer Who’s Rethinking Mountain Interiors {Meet The Denver Designer Who’s Rethinking Mountain Interiors} – English

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Denver-based design firm River + Lime operates under a simple premise when creating spaces for homeowners, architects and developers: “To complement, not compete with, the natural environment,” says founding principal Margaret Selzer, who oversees residential projects that span the mountains of the American West. “You’ll see that we’re drawn to organic materials and the layering of textures to create warmth and interest; minimal palettes that complement the uncomplicated beauty of the location.” Here, Selzer shares what drives her designs and what’s next for her firm.

What’s your take on “mountain” design? The days of embroidered bear pillows are over. I think good mountain architecture and design has evolved to be a reflection of the location—a more harmonious response to the environment and how clients are interacting with nature.

Do you have any current design obsessions? I’m currently obsessed with Caste, a furniture line from Montana. Their pieces are sculptural and organic—functional pieces of art that make a statement.

What’s on the horizon? I’m really interested in the artisans and makers behind the products we buy. Last year, through Jaipur Rugs Foundation, I visited a rug-weaving village in India that helps to create opportunities for women through entrepreneurship and social development. I want to move our firm toward partnering with manufacturers like Jaipur Rugs, so that our purchases can have a much larger impact.

PHOTO COURTESY RIVER + LIME

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Take In The Mountain Views From This Refreshed Colorado Hotel {Take In The Mountain Views From This Refreshed Colorado Hotel} – English

Take In The Mountain Views From This Refreshed Colorado Hotel {Take In The Mountain Views From This Refreshed Colorado Hotel} – English

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The Madeline Hotel & Residences, an Auberge Resorts Collection property located in the heart of Mountain Village—high above the dramatic box canyon that cradles the town of Telluride—has long lured travelers with its Heidi-esque alpine views. But after a property-wide redesign completed in May, it’s the scenery inside that’s catching eyes.

Led by interior designer Liubasha Rose of Rose Ink Workshop, the refresh highlights a hygge palette of wood-grained walls, hefty ceiling beams, rough-cut marble tables, sweater-stitch carpets, and the work of more than 30 collaborators and artisans, from wood accents by Matt Downer to oversize artworks by Hanna Margetson-Rushmore.

An ornate oak bar and cozy nooks in the fireplace-warmed Timber Room—the property’s new indoor-outdoor après-ski lounge—nod to Megève and Gstaad, while updated guest rooms lean more modern with black steel desks, leather drawer pulls from Telluride’s Crossbow Leather, and art and accessories in bold black and white. The only thing untouched? Those storied mountain views.

PHOTO COURTESY MADELINE HOTEL & RESIDENCES

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Joy Fills A Swiss Chalet-Inspired Colorado Home With Global Notes {Joy Fills A Swiss Chalet-Inspired Colorado Home With Global Notes} – English

Joy Fills A Swiss Chalet-Inspired Colorado Home With Global Notes {Joy Fills A Swiss Chalet-Inspired Colorado Home With Global Notes} – English

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To build this dreamed-of Rocky Mountain getaway, the clients worked with architect Patrick Melancon. “They are well-traveled,” he notes. “Swiss mountain architecture inspired them, so we created a house that reads as a series of gabled cottages connected by hallways. This spot has panoramic views in every direction, and the home’s forms take advantage of them.” Although the project turned the Southern architect into an avid skier himself—“I spent a lot of time here in the winter during construction,” Melancon notes—he relied on general contractor George Roberts and his team (based in nearby Eagle) to build the snow country house. “I have a reverence for people who build in extreme climates,” he says. “George and his team know these mountains and have developed some kind of scar tissue that allows them to work year-round—and they make it look easy.”

When the stone-and-timber home was nearly complete, the owners brought Stuart to the project—not the point the designer generally enters the picture. “They were 90 percent done and hoped to have the interiors complete by Christmas—six months from the time they hired us,” Stuart says. “For our office, this is an extraordinarily abbreviated timeline. But they are wonderful people and the location is beautiful, so we went for it.” The designer began the project with a speed she describes as befitting a “reality television decorating show.”

Melancon set the interiors framework with Montana Chief Cliff stone, rich wood ceilings and sizable beams. “I introduced a textural materiality, selecting elements with warmth, substance and weight to stand up to the scale of the house,” Stuart notes. “You can’t have items that are too refined or understated here. Instead, we opted for chunky rugs, handwoven textiles and grass cloth.”

For designers like Stuart, it’s not enough to simply furnish a home. “There’s a French phrase, l’objet juste, that means ‘the right object.’ That’s the feeling I strive for in design,” she says. “It’s important to assemble unique items that speak precisely to a place. I’m not a designer who presents a design scheme as a complete package, instead I find things as I go.” Without the luxury of time, Stuart relied on trusted craftspeople and vendors and, as she says, “called in more than a few favors.” For example, the spiky, agate-studded chandelier that hangs above the dining table. Crafted by artisans at Tuell and Reynolds, it’s what Stuart calls a “special piece” that sets the tone for the rest of the interiors.

But a number of vintage touches provide the “distinctive and quirky” notes Stuart was also seeking, such as the rare Eternal Forest coffee table by Philip and Kelvin LaVerne in the living room, the 1950s-era ski posters hanging over the fireplace and in a hallway, and the carved cabinet—something Stuart says looks like it was crafted by a “hippie artisan”—in the dining room. “Discovering things is the fun part,” she says with the tone of a person who relishes the hunt. “I love finding pieces that are full of interest, movement and life. These are the kinds of items that once placed, no one would ever want to replace.”

Thus, a tailored home was delivered on time, making it something like a proverbial holiday miracle. “The time constraint was a challenge, and it wouldn’t have been possible if the beautiful canvas of the structure wasn’t already there,” says Stuart. “We were able to quickly create something lovely and appropriate to the client. I can’t say I’d want every project to be like this, but we had a blast working on this one.”

Now that they are in part-time residence, it’s possible the Bayou State owners might find fellow Southern ski enthusiasts as neighbors. “When I’m skiing during the first part of the year, it’s impossible not to notice all the Mardi Gras beads,” says Melancon. “I look at it as a tip of the hat to New Orleans culture in the mountains.”

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The Hotel Breathing Fresh Life Into Colorado’s Mining History {The Hotel Breathing Fresh Life Into Colorado’s Mining History} – English

The Hotel Breathing Fresh Life Into Colorado’s Mining History {The Hotel Breathing Fresh Life Into Colorado’s Mining History} – English

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In Golden, one of Colorado’s oldest mining-era towns, local history has come alive in a fresh new way with the debut of The Eddy Taproom & Hotel, a 49-room boutique hotel and restaurant that opened its doors in June.

Located on the former site of the Golden Fire Brick Company, which dates back to the 1860s, the new building—designed by Denver’s Craine Architecture—nods to its predecessor with a brick exterior, riveted-steel panels, rough-hewn wood floors, coffered tin ceilings and turn-of-the-century light fixtures.

Within that industrial skin, Denver-based interior design firm Studio R Design mixed contemporary and vintage furnishings with Gold Rush references—from the black leather swing chairs that greet travelers as they enter the hotel, to guest rooms’ mining-cart-inspired desks and dark-as-ink headboard walls that riff on classic board-and-batten paneling.

Equally unique are the room configurations, which include family-friendly suites with inviting double bunks.

PHOTO COURTESY THE EDDY TAPROOM & HOTEL

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Keep Cozy (And Green) At This Scandinavian-Inspired Alpine Lodge {Keep Cozy (And Green) At This Scandinavian-Inspired Alpine Lodge} – English

Keep Cozy (And Green) At This Scandinavian-Inspired Alpine Lodge {Keep Cozy (And Green) At This Scandinavian-Inspired Alpine Lodge} – English

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What’s in a name? In the case of Electric Pass Lodge, a new development comprising 53 two- and three-bedroom ski-in/ski-out residences at the base of Snowmass Ski Area, the name celebrates a design that’s completely powered by renewable energy.

“We set out to design not only a contemporary, Scandinavian-inspired alpine lodge, but the most sustainable, all-electric condominium building in the Colorado mountains,” says Christian Barlock, principal at 4240 Architecture, which collaborated with interior design firm River + Lime on the project. Upon its anticipated spring 2023 debut, “Electric Pass Lodge will set a new standard for the future of building design in Snowmass and hopefully for ski resorts across North America.”

A combination of a rooftop solar array and off-site renewable electricity will power the building, which includes a health club, lounge and ski locker room. Triple-pane windows, robust insulation, phase-change ceilings that retain and release heat, and a mechanical system that pre-heats or -cools incoming fresh air will all minimize the structure’s energy appetite while keeping residents comfortable even on the coldest winter days.

Electric Pass Lodge

PHOTOS COURTESY ELECTRIC PASS LODGE

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Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

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Tremblay had six months to transform what he calls “a typical lodge-like home” into something brighter and more contemporary. “We had to be mindful of what we should remove and what we should leave alone because it already worked,” he says. “The house was in great shape and the owners liked the layout, so we didn’t have structural changes to make, which allowed us to focus on interior scale, finishes and fixtures.”

To that end, his team—including senior project managers Melissa Adair and Rachel Ortiz, who oversaw the interior detailing—squared up a sea of dated arches that defined the interior doorways and revamped a series of stodgy fireplaces that were too large for the rooms they occupied. The designers also removed nonstructural columns in the entry and the basement that chopped up visual lines through the home. By simplifying the architecture, Tremblay’s team created a clean backdrop.

“We really had to ‘de-wood’ the place,” Tremblay says, by which he means that the team deployed multiple strategies—including staining, painting or replacing the wood. In Ashley’s office, for example, the team reworked the built-ins by removing shelves and adding a mirrored backing. Across the room, an elegant marble-and-steel fireplace surround balances the look. “Keeping original elements was important to us all,” Tremblay adds, noting that simply staining ceiling beams darker, and therefore removing yellow undertones, preserved the textural charm of such details while bringing the space up to date.

Only two spaces got a complete overhaul: the primary bathroom and the basement. A warren of small, oddly shaped spaces prior to the renovation, the primary bath was gutted and reimagined as a contemporary oasis with his-and-her bronze- framed shower enclosures and a handsome copper tub. A shimmery copper screen hangs behind the makeup vanity, making “the most beautiful place for Ashley to sit and start her day,” Adair says. The basement bar area—which, before the work started, resembled an Olive Garden restaurant— became a contemporary entertaining space after Tremblay’s team removed wood floors and cabinetry and a stone arch above the wine cellar door. In their place, handsome black cabinets and modern glass-and-metal shelving—all atop a sleek honed limestone flooring—create a gorgeous space for the Browns to entertain.

Throughout, layers of textural finishes and decor make the rooms feel both cozy and elegant. Upholstered furniture in tactile linens, velvets and leathers, in mostly muted hues with shades of blue woven smartly into the mix, make for pleasing scenes. “We pulled furniture from countless lines,” Tremblay says, “which helps make the interiors endure the test of time.” Carefully selected wall treatments, such as the metallic raffia wallpaper in the basement living area and the painted walls with gold-leaf detail in the primary bedroom, are stylistic counterpoints to the warm white walls throughout most of the home. Against these ideal backdrops hang exquisite, sculptural light fixtures. “Our philosophy on lighting is ‘the bigger, the better,’” Tremblay laughs. “We found unique pieces, and nearly every room has one that takes your breath away.” His favorite: the Skakuff fixture that extends into the entry from the second floor.

Outside, the architecture remains entirely unchanged—enhanced only by fresh paint on the stucco, a light editing of the landscaping, and a contemporary stone sculpture by the Phillips Collection. While the Browns live primarily in Florida, the Colorado summers draw them to the Centennial State, where they relish their new pad’s fresh style and the opportunity to entertain, indoors and out. “When it’s just Ed and me, the home feels livable and cozy,” Ashley says. “But when we have company, the space is magnificent for entertaining. We use—and love—every space in this house.”

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Consider This Light-Filled Vail Valley Haven A Mountain Masterpiece {Consider This Light-Filled Vail Valley Haven A Mountain Masterpiece} – English

Consider This Light-Filled Vail Valley Haven A Mountain Masterpiece {Consider This Light-Filled Vail Valley Haven A Mountain Masterpiece} – English

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Designer Erika Dowe Fitzgerald freely admits that the Vail Valley home defies definition. It has the markers of a classic ski chalet—rustic wood, fireplaces, fur throws, antiques, even some antlers—along with mudded stone walls crafted with a classic “smear” technique. But any mountain overtones are tempered by the uber-modern use of steel and glass. The contrast comes to a crescendo in a striking glass-encased walkway that flows into to a window-filled, aspen-ringed great room the homeowners refer to as “the treehouse.” You could correctly call the home traditional, modern, transitional, European, even a bit eclectic—all living together under one high-sloping roof. “That is why it’s hard to classify,” says Fitzgerald.

Even the home’s history is unconventional: It was originally used as a bachelor pad. When architect Mike Foster first glimpsed the home, tucked within Avon’s picturesque Mountain Star community, it had a bare-bones kitchen that lacked an oven and a primary bedroom without a door. That wasn’t going to cut it for the current homeowners, a family of seven that has long split time between homes in Kansas City and Vail. Foster addressed those initial issues immediately. Then, after the family had spent a few years in the house, he devised phase two: the addition of three bedrooms, three bathrooms and a great room for entertaining. It was a major expansion, ringing in at about a third of the total square footage. And to seamlessly marry the wings together, Foster proposed what’s become the undisputed standout: a striking atrium-like passageway topped with lengthy spans of glass. “It is now the most surprising feature in the house,” remarks the homeowner.

Atriums aren’t exactly the norm in Colorado, yet this house has two. The existing entrance was already a sunny double-height space with a steel-and-glass ceiling, and a sensitivity to the original architecture led to Foster’s proposal of extending that idea for the passageway. But it wasn’t easy to pull off. “It was a challenge, with so many complex angles and slopes, but it was the best way to honor the pre-existing design—and it turned out to be amazing,” says Foster. Adds builder Sean McGinley, “It’s an art piece. I’d never done anything like that before, and I haven’t done anything like it since.”

The other way that Foster and McGinley extended the original design was through continuing the “German smear” stonework in the addition—a style so named because of the irregular stone and heavy mortar found in the centuries-old cottages and castles of northern Germany. “It’s kind of an older, pioneer type of masonry, but it’s right next to the glass and the steel, which becomes such a cool mix,” notes McGinley. The juxtaposition plays out again through the great room’s traditional log cabin- style accent wall, which is crafted from reclaimed barn wood beams and “chinking,” an old-school joint sealant, creating a dramatic divergence from the floor-to-ceiling glass wall beside it. “What we were hoping to achieve is the feel of a European chalet, with all these gorgeous textures, while having other modern elements that enhance rather than detract from them,” says Fitzgerald.

As the architectural elements moved into place, Fitzgerald conjoined the home’s traditional and contemporary elements with furnishings that nod to both styles. A pared-back palette emphasizes the clean lines. “The design is driven by aesthetic, but also by comfort,” Fitzgerald explains. “The name ‘The Linger Longer’ inspired the ethos we used when approaching everything.” The stylistic push-pull is summed up in the great room, where modern Minotti chairs play off a substantial antique-style bar custom-crafted from 17th-century doors found by the homeowners in Denver. Everything, from the dining room’s soft slip-covered bench to the custom sink-right-in sofas, encourages relaxation. And yes, there’s fur, antlers and even some taxidermy (passed down from the homeowner’s brother-in-law) that say chalet, not beach house. “It nods to a strong sense of place,” says Fitzgerald.

That sense of place is important to the homeowner, who envisions his house as a family gathering point for generations to come. He and his wife are eager to introduce the magic of Colorado to their new grandchildren. “We’re surrounded
by aspens and wildflowers, so it’s amazing year-round,” he says. “It’s a literal breath of fresh air.”

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Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver {Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver} – English

Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver {Embrace This Fresh Take On Red, White And Blue In Denver} – English

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“The couple appreciates American antiques, and they gravitate toward a red, white and blue color scheme,” explains Watts. “I took the colors and added my own eye to them.” The result is an inviting dwelling done in shades of pale blue, berry red and whites that beautifully complement the clients’ collection of heirlooms and needlepoint pieces.

“The house was newly built, and I noticed a lot of potential the first time I saw it,” remembers Watts. “I was in charge of adding warmth with personal touches through elements like finishes, wall coverings, drapes and lighting.”

Serving as a prime example of Watts’ nuanced color palette approach, the dining room features navy-and-white patterned seating, two deep-red wicker captain chairs, and drapes with a delicate blue-and-raspberry floral pattern. The varied color intensities and textures give the room “depth and interest,” Watts points out. The crisp white paneling provides a fresh backdrop for pieces like the dark-wood antique sideboard, while “the lighter tones in the rug, walls and drapes make the darker colors pop,” she adds.

A subtle color shift happens in what the family calls the “puzzle room,” where a cool, light blue-gray shade allows the warm natural tones of the pine armoire and round table—around which relatives can leisurely tackle a jigsaw—to shine. Again, a similar light-dark contrast occurs between the living room, where a large wall of glass doors sets the walls aglow with natural light, and an adjacent sitting room, which feels cozy covered in a blue grasscloth, blue-hued rattan sofa and a striped blue-and-white rug.

In the kitchen, the color needle reverts to white. Working with the room’s pre-existing dark-wood ceilings and light cabinets, Watts tied the space with the rest of the house adding navy counter stools and a red lantern fixture from Harbinger New York.

Beyond the main living space, the colorway extends to two bedrooms that each take on an Americana hue. The red room gets a big dose of pattern from the flowered Schumacher fabric that covers the bed frame and composes the drapes. “With the boldness of the floral textile, I selected calmer bedding,” notes Watts. The blue bedroom sounds a quieter note, with pale walls and blues that run from sky to navy. “The client has a collection of wildlife and nature illustrations, and this seemed like the perfect space to hang them,” the designer says of the soothing room.

When paired with refined accents and beloved furnishings, the edited palette makes for a cohesive design that’s both charming and functional. “The rooms relate to each other beautifully, and you can move pieces from one room to the next as needed,” says Watts. “I love how a simple idea became something so layered.”

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The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign {The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign} – English

The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign {The Luxury Aspen Resort That’s Sporting A Striking Redesign} – English

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The lobby and living room at Aspen resort The Little Nell have always been among the chicest meeting spots in town, but a new redesign by Luis Bustamante Studio of Spain quite literally casts the spaces in a new light.

The lobby sports lightened-up wood finishes and introduces a motif of striking geometries, seen first in round brass tables that rest atop a geometric-patterned rug. The split-level living room beyond features new furnishings along with bold paintings by Bustamante, formerly a professional painter and sculptor.

“Because Luis Bustamante’s background is in sculpture,” says the design firm’s Julian Castillo, “he conceives space as a whole piece of art, where there is a strong interplay between the materials, lighting, furniture and artwork. Then there’s the place: In response to the climate in Aspen, especially in winter, the first thing you’ll feel here is coziness—the feeling of being embraced, warm and protected.”

In other words, all the vibes a storied ski resort should deliver.

PHOTO COURTESY THE LITTLE NELL

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