Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

The post Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Tremblay had six months to transform what he calls “a typical lodge-like home” into something brighter and more contemporary. “We had to be mindful of what we should remove and what we should leave alone because it already worked,” he says. “The house was in great shape and the owners liked the layout, so we didn’t have structural changes to make, which allowed us to focus on interior scale, finishes and fixtures.”

To that end, his team—including senior project managers Melissa Adair and Rachel Ortiz, who oversaw the interior detailing—squared up a sea of dated arches that defined the interior doorways and revamped a series of stodgy fireplaces that were too large for the rooms they occupied. The designers also removed nonstructural columns in the entry and the basement that chopped up visual lines through the home. By simplifying the architecture, Tremblay’s team created a clean backdrop.

“We really had to ‘de-wood’ the place,” Tremblay says, by which he means that the team deployed multiple strategies—including staining, painting or replacing the wood. In Ashley’s office, for example, the team reworked the built-ins by removing shelves and adding a mirrored backing. Across the room, an elegant marble-and-steel fireplace surround balances the look. “Keeping original elements was important to us all,” Tremblay adds, noting that simply staining ceiling beams darker, and therefore removing yellow undertones, preserved the textural charm of such details while bringing the space up to date.

Only two spaces got a complete overhaul: the primary bathroom and the basement. A warren of small, oddly shaped spaces prior to the renovation, the primary bath was gutted and reimagined as a contemporary oasis with his-and-her bronze- framed shower enclosures and a handsome copper tub. A shimmery copper screen hangs behind the makeup vanity, making “the most beautiful place for Ashley to sit and start her day,” Adair says. The basement bar area—which, before the work started, resembled an Olive Garden restaurant— became a contemporary entertaining space after Tremblay’s team removed wood floors and cabinetry and a stone arch above the wine cellar door. In their place, handsome black cabinets and modern glass-and-metal shelving—all atop a sleek honed limestone flooring—create a gorgeous space for the Browns to entertain.

Throughout, layers of textural finishes and decor make the rooms feel both cozy and elegant. Upholstered furniture in tactile linens, velvets and leathers, in mostly muted hues with shades of blue woven smartly into the mix, make for pleasing scenes. “We pulled furniture from countless lines,” Tremblay says, “which helps make the interiors endure the test of time.” Carefully selected wall treatments, such as the metallic raffia wallpaper in the basement living area and the painted walls with gold-leaf detail in the primary bedroom, are stylistic counterpoints to the warm white walls throughout most of the home. Against these ideal backdrops hang exquisite, sculptural light fixtures. “Our philosophy on lighting is ‘the bigger, the better,’” Tremblay laughs. “We found unique pieces, and nearly every room has one that takes your breath away.” His favorite: the Skakuff fixture that extends into the entry from the second floor.

Outside, the architecture remains entirely unchanged—enhanced only by fresh paint on the stucco, a light editing of the landscaping, and a contemporary stone sculpture by the Phillips Collection. While the Browns live primarily in Florida, the Colorado summers draw them to the Centennial State, where they relish their new pad’s fresh style and the opportunity to entertain, indoors and out. “When it’s just Ed and me, the home feels livable and cozy,” Ashley says. “But when we have company, the space is magnificent for entertaining. We use—and love—every space in this house.”

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A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style {A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style} – English

A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style {A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style} – English

The post A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The resulting manse is a study in breathtaking symmetry, with a serious brick façade accented with limestone quoins and chimney caps. And though VanderHorn and his team researched the classic 18th-century Georgian estates of master architects for inspiration before starting the project, his own interpretation also manages to embrace fresh, modern style—something he accomplished by simply paring down. “In general, you don’t want too much of a good thing,” he says with a laugh. “A Georgian home in the 1700s would have had a lot more detailing, but we didn’t want to overdo it. We didn’t want the moments of architectural interest to become visual clutter.”

Despite demonstrating restraint, however, VanderHorn’s mark is felt throughout the interiors—from the expansive Palladian windows and heavy molding to the intricate plaster cornices and arched openings. All of this set a luxe backdrop when it came time for designer Inson Wood to put the finishing touches on the interiors: a job made infinitely easier by the incredible material palette. Tumbled Botticino marble on the floors in the entry foyer and white statuary marble fabricated by Chesney’s on the surrounds of each of the seven fireplaces contribute to the old-world feel, while cerused white-oak flooring elsewhere offers a contemporary feel. “Every material has a very interesting texture,” Wood says. “There are almost no flat or smooth surfaces. I wanted the pieces I selected to feel the same way, so I tried to cultivate a hand-warped and natural feel.”

Even the Venetian plaster used on the walls in the center reception area, for example, has been hand-waxed and formulated with gold dust. “It’s a shimmer that you can barely see, but it adds warmth to the white walls,” Wood explains. “The effect is fancy and elaborate yet also very subtle.” Columns distinguish the reception area from the open dining and living areas on either side. In lieu of walls, a pair of glass screens provides a sense of separation without sacrificing the flow of light. “The living, sitting and dining rooms are open in this fantastic space, which lends itself very well to cocktail parties where people are wandering about,” Wood says.

In the dining room, modern artwork and simple Swedish furnishings complement the comfortable, contemporary pieces and neutral palette of the adjacent living area. In the more intimate spaces, colorful antique rugs, ornate French and Russian furnishings, and pieces from the owners’ existing collection are combined seamlessly. “Many times we create these historical mansions to be period-perfect,” Wood says. “In reality, however, people from those times would have included pieces from a number of countries and eras.”

Indeed, in the wife’s elegant sitting room, inspired by a 17th-century French chateau, gilded moldings and crystal chandeliers are joined by an eclectic Buddha head that rests atop an antique Biedermeier desk. On the other end of the spectrum, too, is the husband’s office, where African masks and trophies from his many safaris sit peaceably alongside a handsome desk and a Chippendale cabinet. “It was important that they each have their own space,” Wood says. “They both have very good taste. They are an international family that has traveled widely and experienced many different cultures, and that is what is represented in the design of their home.”

This article originally appeared in the Winter 2015 New York issue of Luxe Interiors + Design.

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A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home {A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home} – English

A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home {A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home} – English

The post A Grand Mediterranean-Style Miami Beach Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


But upon closer inspection, this 21st-century dwelling could be considered the architectural equivalent of an undercover agent, an operative of contemporary design infiltrating an esteemed neighbor- hood of historically preserved abodes: The embellished exterior that blends harmoniously into its surroundings also serves as a guise for its minimalist agenda. “Since the original home was historically significant, the city required that the new construction represent the same architectural style,” explains architect Kiko Franco. “The challenge was to incorporate the homeowner’s modern tastes.”

Arguably, the new dwelling’s simple street presence is a contemporary take on the traditional Mediterranean form. The rear exterior strikes a more classical tone with curved openings and a clear visual of the multiple gabled roofs laid with terra-cotta tiles imported from Bogota´, Colombia. However, the vast windows and glass railings that supply generous water views are elements of the indoor-outdoor rubric that defines modern design. “The house really captures and respects the South Florida landscape,” says Franco’s associate and project architect Jon Bonita, who is also referring to the region’s proclivity for tempestuous weather.

That said, part of the home’s modernity is owed to its innovative armor made of tough load-bearing masonry, muscular engineered-wood trusses and substantial hurricane-grade glass. The latter is especially paramount considering the home’s architectural apex, a decidedly un-Mediterranean 15-foot glass pyramid that crowns the living room. “At the time, it was the largest allowable skylight that met the hurricane-impact standards for South Florida,” explains Bonita. “It’s a unique piece that makes a spectacular statement.”

This sparkling zenith appropriately sheds light on the focal point of the interiors, a double-height living room that exhibits another aspect of modernism: symmetry. Identical suede-upholstered Christian Liaigre Brannan sofas flank the room’s main event—a soaring fireplace faced with textured limestone and rich sapele wood panels. The simple arrangement is an elegant iteration of the homeowner’s desire to keep the interiors minimal. By design, furnishings with sleek profiles don’t detract from the home’s true conversation pieces.

“The homeowner didn’t mind the Mediterranean style outside but insisted on a more contemporary South Beach look inside,” says interior designer Louis Shuster, who worked with designer Eric Dyer to realize the project. “We focused on creating subtle details and clean, linear surfaces,” adds Dyer.

The dining room intentionally functions less for feasting than for exhibiting wine. A translucent cellar-like fixture showcases rare vintages, while a lead-crystal dining table seems to dissolve into the sophisticated vignette. This disappearing act simultaneously accentu- ates the clear wine enclosure as it exalts the sepia-tone work from the homeowner’s collection framed within the buffet.

Here, creating a niche to display art is the exception, not the rule. Throughout the house, the collection is mostly exhibited gallery-style on plain walls. The pieces dominate their surroundings, underscoring the value of minimalist accoutrements. However, in the master suite and family room—where furnishings were kept simple, neutral and streamlined—large bare windows expose their own hidden agenda by quietly diverting focus from the attention-getting, water-themed wall hangings to the real aquatic spectacles: an infinity pool and ocean-fed bay glistening in the distance.

This article was originally published in the Summer 2012 Florida issue of Luxe Interiors + Design.

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You’ll Soon Be Able To Move Into This Historic Charleston Building {You’ll Soon Be Able To Move Into This Historic Charleston Building} – English

You’ll Soon Be Able To Move Into This Historic Charleston Building {You’ll Soon Be Able To Move Into This Historic Charleston Building} – English

The post You’ll Soon Be Able To Move Into This Historic Charleston Building appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

71 Wentworth

The adaptive reuse of a 19th-century building fronting Charleston’s King Street is paving the way for a mixed-use property that lasts 150 years more.

Built circa-1871 by architect John Henry Devereux for the city’s freemasons, the Tudor Gothic Revival edifice sat sentinel at 71 Wentworth Street for decades, until developers East West Partners got designs to transform it with the aid of architect Kevan Hoertdoerfer, designer Cortney Bishop and the blessing of the Preservation Society of Charleston. Double- to triple-height cathedral ceilings and gothic arched windows soar as high as 18 feet, within 12 superlative private residences that span the upper two floors.

Designed to spec by Bishop in five distinct floor plans, they’ll feature original materials (exposed antique brick, original heart pine beams), elegant loggias, high-end appliances, luxury finishes (hand-troweled plaster, certified sustainable French oak floors, Evirio marble, Zellige tile), local cabinetry by Brooks Custom Woodworks and sculptural furnishings, plus modern technologies that bring the building forward. Units will be move-in ready early next year.

living room with brick walls

PHOTOS COURTESY EAST WEST PARTNERS

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How A Perfectly Crisp AZ Retreat Became The Ultimate Sanctuary {How A Perfectly Crisp AZ Retreat Became The Ultimate Sanctuary} – English

How A Perfectly Crisp AZ Retreat Became The Ultimate Sanctuary {How A Perfectly Crisp AZ Retreat Became The Ultimate Sanctuary} – English

The post How A Perfectly Crisp AZ Retreat Became The Ultimate Sanctuary appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It was this natural palette that inspired designers Kim and Kathryn Scodro when they teamed up with architect Bing Hu and builder Steve Sommer to realize their clients’ vision for a traditional abode on a nearly one-acre lot abutting a mountainous forest preserve in Scottsdale. “They wanted an East Coast aesthetic that fit within the beauty of a desert setting,” Kim says. But realizing the owners’ goals while adhering to the gated community’s rigid design guidelines, which specified dark colors and textured materials, posed significant hurdles. “The guidelines are about respecting the desert and blending in with it,” Hu explains, noting the area was originally a cattle ranch.

Armed with historic photos of desert ranches, Hu pitched his ideas to the committee, ultimately winning approval to contrast the neutral cement board siding and western sandstone with brilliant white roof eaves and window trim. Crisp white millwork likewise defines the covered front entrance, which is set off by pale blue door. “It’s a nice arrival point,” Hu observes.

It also sets the tone for what’s to come: calming interiors with classic touches—such as custom millwork and a marble fireplace—that nod to the clients’ desire for a casually elegant sanctuary. “We wanted it to feel warm and welcoming,” explains the wife.

With that in mind, Kim and Kathryn selected a bright, cheerful Sarah Otts oil painting as a greeting in the foyer. “She fell in love with this piece,” Kim says of the wife’s reaction to the colorful abstract. “It’s just happy.”

For the sanctuary-esque vibe that the owners desired, the designers chose to integrate shades of blue throughout. A blue tête-à-tête in the adjacent living room and the hand-painted flowers upon a neutral wallcovering in the dining room both nod to the owners’ classic leanings. But the fresh color keeps it casual enough for the rooms to feel family-friendly (which is necessary, as there are two children and a golden retriever running around). The palette flows into the kitchen, where doors painted in a muted blue-gray color pop against the creamy perimeter cabinetry, quartzite counters and hand-tumbled white subway backsplash. “It all flows and works together,” Kim says.

The bedrooms are no exception. Designed with the wife in mind, the room’s pale wall-to-wall carpeting and a neutral grass-cloth wallcovering “add such warmth,” Kim muses, while also highlighting the white millwork and peaked wood-beamed ceiling. And, while the team may have been thinking of the wife’s preferences, the husband enjoys the restful space just as much. “He drinks coffee in the corner chair in the bedroom every morning,” the wife says. “It’s a beautiful place to watch the sunrise.”

But the home is not just meant to be a respite for its owners. The clients wanted their guests to feel just as comfortable, so the team created a first-floor guest suite, complete with a private patio. “It feels like the chicest hotel room,” notes Kim.

Accessible from just about every room, the exterior spaces are just as breathtaking. The living area opens to a spacious covered patio complete with areas for living, dining and cooking. A verdant patch of grass frames the placid blue swimming pool, which has an integrated hot tub with picture-perfect mountain views.

With such a plethora of areas to spread out, these outdoor spaces have proven to be some of the most well-used spaces. During this time of avoiding indoor interactions, the ability to enjoy socially distanced outdoor gatherings (even setting up a movie screen so the kids could enjoy their favorite popcorn thriller from the water) has proved to be a life saver. “Even these minimal and simple interactions give you the fuel to go on,” the wife says. “These spaces have worked overtime.”

“With ceilings reaching over 20 feet, the goal for this space was to make the room feel inviting,” says designer Kim Scodro of the entry to this Scottsdale home she designed with architect Bing Hu. To that end, she installed a colorful abstract artwork by Sarah Otts above an Asian-inspired Hickory Chair console.

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A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm {A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm} – English

A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm {A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm} – English

The post A Bold Colorado Home Shines With A Funky Spin On Cape Cod Charm appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The designer and architect Matt Stais collaborated on a design that spoke to Amy’s personality, with references to her roots in Cape Cod. “She’s fun, playful, young and she has a lot of spark,” Schumacher says, “She also wanted the home to reflect Cape Cod, so we incorporated all of those things.” The hydrangea-lined driveway leads to a shingled home whose exterior is illuminated by gas lanterns—all of it a nod to Amy’s New England upbringing. Inside, she gave Schumacher carte blanche to design a new environment for her and her kids.

The designer set the tone with a chic take on a ski-lodge fireplace, inspired by the couple’s 25 years in Breckenridge, where Rob and Stais developed a series of resorts. Here, a floating chimney is lined with a cobalt-blue wood veneer wallcovering that sets the home’s palette. “It’s the first thing you see when you come through the front door,” Schumacher says. But getting it there took some serious engineering. “The hanging fireplace was a big deal,” Stais says. General contractor Dan Fuller says his team had to add additional structure overhead so the ceiling could support its tremendous weight, in addition to steel and concrete bracing all around so it wouldn’t sway.

Schumacher showed the fireplace wallpaper sample to her cabinetmaker, who responded with cabinetry for the bar and kitchen in the same color. She then added feminine touches to the kitchen, like bumping out the blue drawers to resemble a bedroom dresser and incorporating a jewelry-like brass detail on the custom range hood, the barstools and cabinet hardware. The same combination is present in the powder room, where she commissioned a chinoiserie wallpaper on a gold background over a deep blue antique console retrofitted to be a vanity.

For the most part, however, the designer kept the interiors neutral to keep the views center stage. But that didn’t mean Schumacher had to abandon her artistic license, especially in Amy’s bedroom: “She wanted it to be soft in color, but at the same time, we gave her snakeskin wallpaper, and we rocked out her bathroom and made it girly. It is just for her, so it reflects her personality.” Schumacher also created a living space that could easily evolve over the years. Big white comfy sofas offer a crisp backdrop for new accent pillows, rugs or throws. “It has a chameleon-type of essence. You can play with pattern and colors and not have it be overly designed,” she says.

Equally important was the outdoor living space, whose prominent views are in front of the house. “It was really about how everything related to the outdoor patio,” says Stais, who situated it on axis with Mount Evans in the distance. He then wrapped the house around the patio with bedroom wings for Amy and the kids extending off the central living area. Glass pocket doors disappear into the walls to make the great room and dining area one with the patio, which is just as large as the interior space.

Landscape designers Nick and Elizabeth Pisani surrounded the patio with low stone walls, ornamental grasses, rose shrubs and dwarf evergreens. “We had to come up with some creative ways to give her privacy in the front but not block her views,” Nick Pisani says. Colorado River boulders throughout the landscape help to soften the home’s linear geometry.

Though nearly everything is located on the main level, there are two guest rooms and a
TV room downstairs. Stais jokes that he was personally invested in designing “really great” guest rooms because his family hopes to be frequent visitors, having become so close with the couple over the years. “This is a lot more than a new house for Amy,” he adds, taking a more serious tone. “It’s a way of moving on, and I took that very seriously.”

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Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla {Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla} – English

Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla {Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla} – English

The post Get Your Zen On With A 360 Embrace Of Minimalism In La Jolla appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The couple purchased this property for its commanding sight lines to the Pacific, teaming with architect Drexel Patterson to start anew. The goal was to create a calming one-story sanctuary that emphasized indoor-outdoor living. Naturally, simplicity ruled their design decisions. They chose a single floor finish, two types of wood for the millwork and a sole paint color for the entire house. “It’s very mellow,” notes general contractor Thomas Waters, who worked with his associate Seth Silano on the project. Here, even the traditional take on a front door has been rethought. Visitors are buzzed through an exterior gate and then slide open a glass panel to enter the home.

Such restraint in the materials and palette led Patterson and project architect Haley Duke to exercise great care as he selected tones, finishes and textures. “When you have a space this simple, you have to ask, ‘How can I strike a balance with texture, materials and warmth?’ ” he says. For him, that meant paying strict attention to the interplay of wood, stone and stucco to make certain that the overall effect was soothing, not sleepy.

Patterson’s geometric floor plan nods to the trademarks of classic Modernist architecture. It’s voluminous and open, with a clean composition that accentuates the materials used and the home’s relationship with the landscape. The house unfolds with four sequential elements between the street and the view to the ocean: the street frontage to the entry courtyard wall; the entry courtyard to the interior pavilion; and the rear courtyard open to the long view across the golf course. “Each of these elements has a sense of scale and containment, even though that containment is complete in each space,” explains Patterson. “The mind makes up for what is not shown visually, so a suggestion is often enough.”

A structural double-column timber framework defines the great room, frames the views and adds a necessary touch of texture. “This was the most minimal aspect that could be added to hold everything together in a visual, sensual way,” Patterson says. “The room would be a little duller without it. The cadence of the posts organizes the room visually and furniture-wise. The gray lines tie across the whole volume and accentuate it. I consider the posts and beams as a vital catalyst to the visual experience.”

Outdoor spaces are just as thoughtfully conceived. The aforementioned entry courtyard includes a fireplace and is now a favorite cocktail spot for the owners. Off the main bedroom is a raised spa and garden, while two guest bedrooms and a study flank a private side yard. Most dramatically, though, a steel pergola extends from the main living space’s ceiling to the back patio, pointing the way to the main outdoor entertaining area. “It’s an important element, as some sort of framework was necessary to make the transition from inside gracious and natural,” says Patterson. Like the exposed beams inside, it suggests a defined space while drawing the eye up and out. Beside it, a series of drought-tolerant coastal Mediterranean plants line organically placed pavers and gravel. “The whole space has the look of a deconstructed grid,” says landscape architect Greg Hebert.

The homeowners themselves outfitted the residence, consulting with designer Pamela Smith of Pamela Smith Interiors as needed. Among the highlights are a stunning use of live-edge walnut slabs for their formal dining table, breakfast bar, and bedroom headboard, plush rugs that markedly contrast the polished concrete floors, plus classic and custom furnishings. “It’s Zen, calming,” says the wife. And is it too monotone, after all? Definitely not.

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A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start {A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start} – English

A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start {A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start} – English

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Architect William Duff joined the couple for many backyard discussions, trying to figure out if it was possible to do their future life justice by merely reconfiguring their longtime home, which he describes as an “unremarkable” 1950s tract house. “Taking into consideration their wish list, we decided it would be best not to ‘Frankenstein’ the home by simply grafting new stuff onto it,” says Duff. All agreed it was better to tear down the old home and start from scratch.

Of the designs for the new house drafted by Duff and his team, architects Jim Westover and Michelle Liu, it was a three-level dwelling with a distinctive butterfly roof–a Le Corbusier hallmark of postwar American residential architecture–that resonated most with the homeowners. “That asymmetrical wing span is a very compelling way to give the home distinction, expression and energy,” says Duff.

But the design’s sentimental high note is the courtyard–an exalted version of the one found in the wife’s ancestral home in India, which also featured a solitary tree. “We both have immigrant backgrounds–my husband was born and raised in Ireland–and we wanted our home to integrate elements from our cultural heritages,” says the wife.

When the accordion glass walls enclosing the rooms flanking the central outdoor space–living room on one side, family room on the other–are folded away, the area becomes the heart of the home. “The landscape was designed to create a seamless transition from the indoors to the outdoor living spaces,” says landscape architect Richard Radford. “We blurred the lines between the two, and expanded the home’s living area into the garden environment.” On sunshine-drenched days, the family–who, by the time the house was completed, had added two children–moves effortlessly through this indoor-outdoor expanse, with ipe decking that’s nearly flush with the white-oak planks inside to make a smooth surface for tricycle wheels and small bare feet. At dusk, this area is particularly magical, thanks to Duff’s minimalist approach to illumination. A few strategically placed up-lights and recessed lighting are designed to let the pretty twilight take precedence over high wattage man-made lights. “I didn’t want anything distracting you from feeling the openness and cleanliness of the space,” says the architect.

When it came to the interiors, designer Robbie McMillan took a “less-is-more” strategy. “That meant incorporating fewer pieces of furniture, which are larger in scale, to anchor the rooms, as well as working with a range of textures and materials to provide an organic warmth and softness to each space,” he says. The concept is illustrated in the family room, where a low-backed sectional with strong lines and a chunky-wood coffee table are able to hold their own in the high-ceilinged space. “The rooms demand furniture groupings with clean lines and a sense of weight and volume to define themselves,” McMillan says. The designer opted for low seating to accommodate clear views to the backyard.

Dinner parties usually start in the living room, next to the fireplace that’s clad in lava stone slabs that jut out at different lengths and angles, both for textural interest (a counterpoint to the smooth floors and low, sleek profiles of the furniture) and visual drama (the shadows created when light washes on the surface of the hearth give the room’s otherwise quiet demeanor more expression). Since the formal dining room is adjacent, it’s just a few steps to the table, where guests have the choice of enjoying two compelling perspectives: Facing the naturalistic landscape of the drought-tolerant plantings by Radford or the modernist glass-and-metal staircase. “The staircase is a very sculptural–and at times kinetic–element that connects the spaces in the house,” says Duff. “You really see the stairs come to life when people are moving up and down them. You get a very pleasant, homey feeling when you see the house in motion, so to speak.”

It’s an easy thing to witness here, given the relaxed flow from one area to another. While natural materials take the edge off this modern floor plan, it’s the movement within the home that gives it true warmth. As the wife puts it, “Living out the story we imagined for our family and our life has been the home’s greatest gift to us.”

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A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views {A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views} – English

A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views {A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views} – English

The post A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


So for a sloping site with prevailing views of Mummy and Camelback Mountains, Drewett introduced a clean-lined structure defined by massive horizontal bands that stretch across the arid landscape. A series of vertical stone walls pierces the planes to shield the interiors from the glare that often comes with east/west exposures. Inside, Drewett uses spatial proportions to increase drama. A low-ceilinged entry creates a pause before opening to the great room, where walls of windows reveal the magnitude of the home’s surroundings. “The house is a celebration of vistas out to the desert,” says the architect. The restrained palette of porcelain cladding further allows the views to be the stars. “This look is very clean,” says builder Rich Brock, “but making sure every piece was installed perfectly was a challenge. There was no room for error.”

But the house almost didn’t make it of the drawing board. When the original owner decided not to finish it, Drewett took steps to turn the project into a spec home; it was during the framing stage that the current owners, a Las Vegas couple in search of a second residence, fell for the modern lines and the locale. “The site is elevated but still private, with an excellent view of Camelback,” the husband says. The couple also appreciated getting in early enough to customize the house to their personal preferences. “We quickly assessed the need for floor plan changes, like the addition of a fifth bedroom and bathroom,” says the wife, noting that they also requested an outdoor dining area be enclosed and transformed into an intimate sitting room.

At about the same time, interior designers Tony Sutton and Jordan Huffman came onboard to handle the finishes. “With the strong architectural lines already established, we were going for a natural look glammed up with a little bit of sparkle through lighting, tile and decorative accents,” says Huffman. In the kitchen, for example, where charcoal-stained walnut cabinetry balances the white marble counters, the designers went all out with a statement-making stove hood and chandelier. The former, a sculptural rendition fashioned from bands of brushed and polished stainless steel, brings on the bling, and the glass ball chandelier effervesces like champagne bubbles. “The light fixture has a reflective quality that mimics the stainless and contains all the tones of the rest of the kitchen,” she observes. “It makes the space special.”

Sparkly moments repeat in the master bathroom, where the walnut vanities are topped with quartz infused with shavings of gunmetal, steel and pewter that shimmer like precious metals, and the floor is a combination of natural stone and gleaming mosaic tiles. “As is often the case with jobs of this magnitude, you expect to get the big things right, so it becomes the little things like the twinkle in the countertop or the right lighting choice that matter,” says Sutton. “They create memory points that last.”

Meanwhile the wife, an interior designer, selected the furnishings and amped up the glam in the formal living room with a quartet of chairs wrapped in champagne-colored lustrous fabric and a chandelier made of gold-lined twisted glass rods and fine metal chains. “It resembles a delicate necklace,” she remarks. The more sedate great room is outfitted with a white leather sectional and a silk rug that follow the tones of the porcelain fireplace wall. Because her husband’s favorite color is purple, she went all-out aubergine in the master bedroom with shimmery plum accents, like the wallcovering that offsets the chiseled limestone fireplace.

Back outside, landscape designer Dennis C. Canady tied everything together with grids of agaves and succulents, and lawn panels that complement the linear architecture. Like everything, the landscape is in keeping with the house, which is essentially a formation of vertical and horizontal forms. “You have to be very careful about how you craft modern architecture to create an elegant, cohesive composition,” Drewett says. “Nothing here is embellished for the sake of embellishment. This house is the essence of what a house needs to be.”

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California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family {California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family} – English

California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family {California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family} – English

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The look was a slight step outside the boundaries of Miller’s portfolio. But that didn’t mean she couldn’t pull it off. “While this was a bit of a departure creatively from what I normally do, I liked the challenge,” she says. “This was exciting, because no one had ever asked me for a California-modern design.”

The house, by residential designer Dennis Rainho, presents a contemporary coastal-style façade with little ornamentation. “The exterior’s clean lines really set the stage and created a stepping point for the finishing details,” he says. Adding an edgy feel amid the structure’s soft gray shutters are dark bronze window and slider frames. “There are no outriggers or molding,” general contractor Michael Maxwell says, “so the shutters are the only architectural feature.” Inside, the owners wanted “a lot of verticality and lots of light,” Maxwell says, so the team placed floor-to- ceiling windows where possible and 13-foot-high walls in spaces such as the living area. They also introduced Shaker-style millwork on ceilings and walls, adding dimension and interest.

The clients, a couple with four children ages 11 to 17, were relocating from a residence with a lot of unused space and unnecessary upkeep. “We lived in an area nearby, but the house just didn’t suit what we needed as our family was growing up,” the wife says. “The idea here was more of a utilization of space and making every room fully functional.” Keeping usability front of mind, the team added an extra set of machines in the laundry room and created a large mudroom with pantry space, a second refrigerator and floor-to-ceiling lockers— one for each child—designed by Miller. “With four kids, all involved in various sports, they needed a space where they could neatly stow all their sports gear and backpacks,” she explains.

The family-friendly mindset continued in Miller’s choice of hardworking performance fabrics throughout the home, such as flax-colored Crypton on the club room sofa and indoor-outdoor textiles on counter stools and dining chairs. “The owners can literally take them outside and hose them off,” she says.

The designer restrained the palette in the common areas for a cool, California vibe, balancing white walls and clean-lined furnishings with wood accents and select shades of blue. Yet she still made sure to leave her signature mark of inserting bold prints where appropriate. The laundry room’s flooring consists of intricately tiled maritime blues and grays, which complement the mudroom’s blue lockers and cabinets. Each bedroom suite also has its own pop of color or pattern: a blowfish-print wallpaper for the son’s bathroom; blush hues for the younger daughters’ shared bedroom; seafoam and lavender tones for the eldest’s.

But the space that draws the most attention is the back exterior, accessed from the living area’s sliding glass doors. With the move to a smaller home, indoor-outdoor living was essential to the family, and the team delivered with a large covered loggia that houses an outdoor kitchen, a dining table and a gathering area. Overlooking the seventh hole on the golf course, the property also includes a pool, a private outdoor shower and an elevated deck with a fire pit and lounge seating. Landscape architect Steve West designed the grounds, and Miller fulfilled the husband’s single request for a triple-faucet sink—just like the one at his favorite local restaurant—in the cabana bathroom.

The family’s new residence is a hive of activity, the wife says, and that’s just what they envisioned. “I’m at the point in my life where I want to enjoy what I have—and our surroundings and my family,” she says. Most importantly, each beautiful space is lovingly used. “We were very intentional with this house,” Miller says. “Every square foot was well thought-out.”

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