A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

The post A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


As a professional couple with young kids were building their family home in the Wash Park, Colorado, neighborhood, they found themselves facing a dilemma: whether to go with sophisticated and polished interiors or keep practicality at the forefront of their plans, since the spaces would have to stand up to their active children. As it turned out, they didn’t have to choose between the two. Their design team promised that they could have both by meeting in the middle, and that’s exactly what they did. “They wanted the house to work for the whole family,” says designer Ashley Larson Eitemiller.

“The homeowners were looking for a large family room for entertaining and for the kids, and a large, wraparound bar that would be open to the kitchen, dining and great rooms,” says residential designer Jim Gunther. Adds Eitemiller, “A lot of activities can happen at once in that open, communal space.”

The home was designed specifically for how the family lives, with various “stowaway spots” they can use as they come and go. “They’re bringing in strollers and all of the attendant kid items,” Gunther says, “so there are multiple areas with organized storage in the home’s front, back and side so they don’t have to carry things all the way through the house, and the open space can stay neat and organized.”

Function meets style with wood elements like corbels, beams and rough-sawn cedar that brings in the casual, Colorado mountain vibe the family loves. “The darker wood beams contrast with the caramel floors, making all the wood really stand out,” Eitemiller says. The couple’s art collection, which includes lots of landscape imagery, also offers a nod to the home’s Colorado aesthetic.

While cool gray color palettes have been wildly popular recently, the homeowners desired more warmth in their home. “They wanted tones that would make the house feel very homey and comfortable, and they were open to jewel colors,” says Eitemiller. “Every space has some element of blue, whether it’s a deep navy, a brighter blue or a beautiful smoky gray-blue. We also brought in some neutral grays, a honey caramel and a nice plum color.”

Layers of texture give the spaces dimension and visual interest. “Throughout, there’s a mix of leather, natural linen and mohair. The carpets are wool, and there are sheers on the windows that allow light in while also offering privacy,” Eitemiller says. “Every room has details designed to visually pull you through the house, such as the wallpaper in the front entry and ceiling beams in the main living spaces.”

Furnishings are stylish yet tough enough for a young family. In the living room, a pair of sofas in camel-colored leather marry beauty and durability, as do refined fiberglass Stone Yard coffee tables. “It looks well put together, but you don’t have to be monitoring everything that’s going on in the house,” says Eitemiller. “We also used Sunbrella outdoor fabric inside, which adds durability.”

One of the primary requirements for this home was to have designated spaces where kids can just take over and play. “Right now, the sun room is used for the kiddos, and it’s a great space right off of the living room and kitchen area,” Eitemiller says. “The children can be playing in that room while their parents are cooking dinner.” There’s also a dedicated playroom upstairs near the bedrooms, and a spacious gymnastics area and playroom downstairs that is designed with no beams or poles to get in the way of the fun.

The family also has a large yard, with plenty of grass for the kids to run around on, as well as exterior entertaining spaces for adults. “The homeowners like to have friends and family over,” says general contractor Patrick Englund. “In the backyard, they have a trellis with heaters above and an exterior fireplace.”

Having come from a home that wasn’t functioning well for them, the family is now enjoying the perfect balance between adult style and kid-friendly design, with fluid spaces for family life and special spots just for playtime. Meanwhile, the home’s interior spaces honor Colorado’s rugged style while giving it modern sensibility.

“We wanted the family to feel comfortable, so they could really live in the house,” says Eitemiller. “They wanted a relaxed, well-designed home that could be used to its fullest without the fear of it being damaged easily. A mountain Colorado feel—but a little bit more refined.”

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After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

The post After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


For many years, while residing in Oklahoma, a Colorado native dreamed of moving his family back to his home state. So, when a work change made it possible to return, it felt like a happy triumph. There was just one catch: The family had grown accustomed to the wide-open spaces of their property in the Sooner State, so their new home on an urban lot in the heart of Denver was an adjustment.

They charged their design team—designer Colin Griffith, landscape designer Joshua Ruppert and builder George Saad—with giving their city house the same kind of connection to the land as their Oklahoma spread. Luckily, the home sits on a corner lot that overlooks Wash Park, so it came endowed with views of Smith Lake, flower gardens and winding trails.

To knit the house even closer to its site, the design team used a similar material palette—including limestone and tongue-and-groove wood panels—on both the interior and the exterior for a seamless effect. “We were creating zones for different activities within the indoor and outdoor spaces,” says Griffith. “Because they are so connected, they needed to feel similar.”

The designer describes that feeling as “livable and relaxed,” which is a departure for these particular homeowners, as their previous home was much more formal. “In their Denver house, the style is sleek and clean,” says Griffith. “We used marble, steel and glass throughout, and this was something new for the clients.”

In order to integrate some of the family’s traditional pieces in the contemporary space, Griffith added new upholstery and patterns. Conversely, he made some of the stark modern architectural elements and finishes more rustic to fit the furnishings. In the sitting room, for instance, the designer used a silk wallcovering to soften the effect of three stone columns that bring an outdoor feeling indoors, while the powder room features a mica wallcovering. For aesthetic balance in the mostly contemporary kitchen, Griffith wire brushed the cabinets for a patinaed effect, wrapped drawers in leather, and installed a bronze range hood over the cooktop.

To open up the home for entertaining, Griffith installed accordion glass doors between the living room and patio. Given that the interior was designed to meld with the back courtyard, when the doors are open the transition between the areas is effortless. “The clients move through the rooms so easily, it’s almost a progressive dinner party within their own home,” Griffith says.

The family inevitably ends up in the living room, their chosen lounging spot. With that in mind, Griffith installed a roomy sectional topped with colorful pillows and shearling throws for what the designer dubs a “Colorado touch.” The room is anchored by a custom designed walnut and oak coffee table with a sculptural bronze base. The table has a special connection to the site, given that some of its wood was sourced from Wash Park by Thomas Harvey, a Denver artisan.

In this house, the outdoor rooms are just as important as the interior spaces. On the rooftop deck, which offers stellar views of the park and mountains, the clients asked for a space that would allow up to 10 people to dine comfortably. Ruppert met the challenge with a dining area and a fire pit, as well as several trees for an “in the treetops” effect.

On the lower-level courtyard and patio, Ruppert used plants to provide beauty as well as privacy. “We layered the spaces with trees, shrubs and flowers in such a way that it feels private but doesn’t totally close out the yard from the rest of the neighborhood,” he explains.

Ruppert and his team used a similar planting strategy outside of the windows to create the feeling of a forest in the city. “We placed a birch tree right in front of the window that faces the stairway,” he says. “It’s lit up at night, so it feels like you’re in a wooded environment.”

Griffith says that, inside or out, the best thing about the new home is that people feel a sense of peace and relaxation in the spaces. “We are all so busy and tethered to technology today, but when you leave your phone and go for a walk in the park, it cleanses your mind, almost like meditation. We really tried to implement that feeling of tranquility in this house.” And, for this family, that feeling is the ultimate homecoming.

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The Vibrant Denver Home With A Speakeasy Original To The 1928 Traditional Tudor {The Vibrant Denver Home With A Speakeasy Original To The 1928 Traditional Tudor} – English

The Vibrant Denver Home With A Speakeasy Original To The 1928 Traditional Tudor {The Vibrant Denver Home With A Speakeasy Original To The 1928 Traditional Tudor} – English

The post The Vibrant Denver Home With A Speakeasy Original To The 1928 Traditional Tudor appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Most grand houses come with some kind of history, but rarely does that include an authentic speakeasy and artwork with mysterious origins. Those were just two of the many charms that enticed the owners of a Prohibition-era, Tudor-style home in the Denver Country Club. On the exterior, bricks laid in a diamond pattern, dormer windows with leaded windowpanes, and a steep gable evoke a storybook ambience, while a stone crest engraved with the letter “T” recalls the original owners—a family named Temple.

But the home’s historic relevance meant the design needed to be sensitive. To strike a balance between respecting its past and accommodating a modern family of five, the new owners turned to designer Andrea Schumacher, who had worked on their previous residences.

The focus, Schumacher says, was taking the bones of a traditional Tudor and infusing it with a lighter, modern aesthetic that’s both beautiful and practical. “We wanted the home to have a sense of history, but with a fresh take reflecting a young family,” she says.

Intricate moldings and woodwork throughout set a warm, elegant tone, but the brown wood was a little too dark for the family’s liking. To offset it, Schumacher painted some of the panels white and brightened the space further through lighter upholstery and carpeting. “I think the most nerve-racking part was picking the paneling that we were going to paint versus what we weren’t,” she laughs. “You can’t easily remove the paint, so we were all clenching our teeth and hoping it would work. It came out perfectly!”

Having worked on the interiors of the family’s previous home, the designer knew which of their pieces would work in the new space and which needed to be updated or reupholstered. Schumacher added texture with vibrant, patterned fabrics as well as playful wallpaper and drapery. She also replaced the dark, gothic light fixtures with simple antique brass candle-style chandeliers.

Since the new home was larger than the family’s previous abode, it allowed them to keep the living room as a more formal entertaining space, complete with a fireplace, dramatic ceiling beams, diamond-paned windows and a grand piano. The extra square footage also means that the kids have a designated playroom on the second floor, allowing for an injection of fun—such as an animal print rug and yellow ottomans—to juxtapose with the rest of the house’s more traditional decor.

While the owners are partial to spending time in the living room, Schumacher says she is particularly fond of the dining room, which features elaborate ceiling moldings and paneling. “Sometimes dining rooms can be formal—and this one does have a formality to it,” she says. “But then the softness of the chairs and the fact that the table is round makes it a bit more casual. It is very comfortable, and you can see yourself hanging out here for a long time.”

And then there’s the speakeasy. Part of the original 1928 home—but not included on the house plans that the owners sourced from the Denver Public Library—the clandestine room behind a hidden door features more than just a bar and lounge. Overlooking the space is a mural depicting what the owners suspect is a scene of downtown Denver in the late 1800s. “We’ve worked with the History Colorado Center to try to figure out who the artist is, and they told us that if the painting is on canvas, it’s likely a more noteworthy artist,” says the owner. “But if it was painted on concrete then it was probably just a family friend.” Turns out, it’s on canvas, but the artist’s identity is still a mystery, only serving to add more intrigue to the space. To evoke the dark, moody vibe of a speakeasy—and to complement the exposed brick—Schumacher opted for rich, red textiles for the sofa and rug, creating a cozier, more intimate gathering alternative to the dining or living room.

Of course, the story behind the speakeasy (and the home in general) is all part of what makes it so charming. “I hope people feel all of the stories that came before us in this house, but also sense that a modern family lives in it now,” the owner says. “We love going out to dinner with friends and then walking home to have a drink in our speakeasy. Being able to have that history of the space, but also the proximity of the city, is one of the things that we love about the house.”

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A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty {A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty} – English

A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty {A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty} – English

The post A Special Montana Dwelling Pays Tribute To The Mountains With Majestic Modesty appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“It was mountains, mountains, mountains,” the owner of a Big Sky home says of the first time she laid eyes on the view from the lot where her and her husband’s Montana vacation getaway would eventually stand. The homeowners didn’t plan on building, but the special parcel, which looks to Lone Mountain, Cedar Mountain and Pioneer Mountain, immediately won them over.

In short order, they hired architect Larry Pearson, who had previously created a “little gem of a house” for a friend. Picturing a smallish, modern dwelling (the wife is an avowed modernist), the couple was surprised when he proposed a larger structure. Recalls Pearson, “They said, ‘Well, this isn’t what we were originally thinking about, but we like it. In fact, we love it!’ ”

From the front elevation, the residence appears modest. “It’s one story and very understated,” says general contractor Todd Thesing, who translated Pearson’s concept into a reality. “It unfolds as you experience the house and start moving through it.” Set deftly into the side of the mountain, the full scope of the 9,000-square-foot structure only becomes entirely visible from the back elevation. “When the client has the confidence to be a little bit original—and they did—they invite the possibility of both transparency and a low-slung design.” The shape harkens back to the ranch-style homes that the architect remembers from his Southern California boyhood. “I always loved the simplicity of that style,” he says, “As an architect, I have a predisposition for not giving it all away. This is a house that is designed around those principles.”

While the home’s front exterior was intended to blend into its surroundings, the interior was conceived to celebrate them, with large expanses of glass created to showcase those exquisite views. “Ten years ago, the engineering existed but windows of this size were not as accessible and had less thermal performance,” says Pearson. The structure itself also works to frame the views. Originally, the visible steel trusses were to have been clad with timbers. Instead, the team opted to have the steel carry its own weight, aesthetically speaking. The result, which carefully balances the home’s rich materials with the lightness and transparency of its design, keeps the focus on that spectacular scenery.

Integrating art and furniture into this framework so that it didn’t disturb the delicate balance that had been created fell on the shoulders of designer Lisa Kanning. “Everything was kept pretty simple,” she says. “You don’t want to detract from the views, but you also want enough interest in your interiors.” Kanning nimbly navigated her task, tipping toward a neutral palette and natural materials with subtle touches of color—like an olive-hued leather in the mud room, a red base for the breakfast nook’s table, the bright yellow of a chair in the den and the gray-green wash on the barn doors in the game room—pulled from the outdoors and the couple’s art collection.

She placed elegant, low-profile sofas in the living area, the game room and the den, all upholstered in gray tones, to echo the streamlined design of the house. “They tend to like cleaner, more European lines,” Kanning says of the homeowners’ preferences. The forms anchor the family’s collection of art by the likes of Charles Arnoldi, Rudy Autio, Joyce Scott and Squeak Carnwath. “That way, the colorful pieces can come in and make the impact they were meant to,” says the designer.

Touches of whimsy—a Sam Maloof rocker in the den, an overstuffed lounge chair and ottoman in the master, and Owen Mortensen’s ethereal tumbleweed chandelier in a guest room—ensure that the interiors hold their own against those stellar views. Striking the right balance so that, despite the sparely furnished rooms, spaces felt warm and inviting rather than cold or empty, was also a factor—every piece needed to pull its weight.

That was especially true when it came to lighting. “We had to get fixtures that wouldn’t interfere with the views but that would give you some light,” says Kanning, who worked with designers from Lindsey Adelman and Gabriel Scott to CP Lighting and Commute Design Studio to create custom pieces that, in addition to illuminating these spaces during short winter days, are sculptural and arresting in their own right.

The final effect is a home that, while large and spare, feels warm, abundant and inviting. So inviting, in fact, that soon after it was completed the owners decided to spend more of their time in Montana. Such is the primal, mesmerizing lure of the majesty of these mountains—and a home designed to celebrate its beautiful setting.

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Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home {Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home} – English

Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home {Fall In Love With The Time-Honored Look Of This English Cottage-Inspired Denver Home} – English

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Strolling past the grand mansions in historic Denver neighborhoods feels a bit like going back in time. With their classical architecture, expansive lawns and winding drives, these turn-of-the-century homes capture the art of graceful living in what was, even then, a burgeoning city. It’s this old-world charm that a couple of Boulder transplants instantly fell in love with when exploring neighborhoods looking for a spot to build a new home. So, when a property became available that was previously part of the historic Brinkerhoff estate, they knew they wanted to tap into that traditional spirit.

“We wanted something that had a sense of history, so it would fit into the area,” recalls the wife. However, as empty nesters, the home also needed to work for their more intimate lifestyle, one filled with Sunday family dinners and cocktail hours with friends. “We were looking for a combination—a classical look on one hand, but not overly formal or grand,” says the husband.

Searching for that balance between traditional gentility and modern ease, they turned to architects Don Ruggles and Melissa Mabe to marry both modes of living. “We’re well known for traditional architecture, but we’re always looking for ways to blend that style into a more contemporary feeling,” notes Ruggles, who also worked on the remodel of the nearby Brinkerhoff mansion, known for its classic French Normandy architecture.

Exploring different styles with the architects, the couple gravitated toward the simple elegance of an English Country cottage with a peaked roof and wood trim accents. “It’s a really intimate, romantic form that has a great sense of human scale,” explains Ruggles. “All the details feel almost close enough to touch.”

The team, which included builder Jeremy Larson, invoked this classic cottage mood with a gabled roofline, employing a pastoral palette of textured wooden beams, hewn stone and creamy stucco for the exterior. These details helped the home “have a sense of familiarity, respecting the history of this little district,” notes Ruggles. With a nod to modernity, however, the façade is punctuated with more hard-edge features like metal overhangs and a black slate roof.

Landscaping also proved key in carving out a graceful entrance. Situated on a hill, the home “had a big elevation difference between the street and the main door,” notes landscape architect Ariel Gelman, who collaborated with landscape designer Troy Shimp to bring the outdoor environment to life. “We wanted to create a smooth approach with gentle steps going up.” They also filled the tiered raised beds with flowering perennials that would bloom year-round, introducing a floral scape that “was a wink to that cottage style.”

This delicate balance continues inside, embracing more formal, enclosed spaces at the front of the house, which dissolves into a more casual, open-plan area. Refreshing, neutral hues between the textiles and furnishings keep stylish continuity between these realms. “The homeowners love the procession of a traditional layout, where you’re greeted by that kind of ceremony as you walk through,” explains Mabe, describing their approach to designing the flow of the home. “But when they want to relax, they can move further into the house and do some indoor-outdoor entertaining.”

This elegant procession begins in the entrance hallway and stairwell. Inspired by the grand molding of a traditional hall, “we wanted to channel that same spirit, but in a more streamlined way,” says Mabe, who collaborated on the interiors with Kelly Flynn and Emily Lindemann. Delicate English bead details in the molding and pilasters with simplified capitals “give you the idea of proportion in the space, but it feels softer and quieter.”

The dining room continues this stately footing, detailed with wainscoting and crown molding that provide a genteel stage for the family’s beloved antique dining set, which the wife grew up with as a child. “That set is coming up on about 100 years old now, and we’ve had it for almost 30,” notes the wife.

For more intimate gatherings, the couple heads further inward into the open kitchen and family room area that’s flooded with sunshine from the central courtyard, which is oriented to the south to receive the most light. “Architecturally, this allows so much of the interior and exterior of the house to unfold naturally,” explains Mabe.

It’s this area that the family gravitates to the most, as the team defines the open layout with natural social anchors, like the kitchen’s expansive island with rich molding details echoing the coffered ceilings above. Or on beautiful days, “when we have friends over, it seems they always end up in the courtyard,” says the husband. There, a natural stone fireplace with a towering chimney adds architectural heft to the space while providing a warming hearth.

It’s these quiet moments of grandeur in such intimate spaces that speaks most to the home’s reimagining of old-world entertaining. “There’s nothing overwrought or overdone,” notes Mabe. “It’s simply welcoming people with beautiful spaces.”

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Classic Details Inspire A Modern-Day Georgia Home {Classic Details Inspire A Modern-Day Georgia Home} – English

Classic Details Inspire A Modern-Day Georgia Home {Classic Details Inspire A Modern-Day Georgia Home} – English

The post Classic Details Inspire A Modern-Day Georgia Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


After touring a historic James Means residence–modified by architect Linda MacArthur–the couple became smitten with the home’s U-shaped plan. “We loved the way it wrapped around the beautiful backyard and pool. We knew immediately that was what we wanted,” says Lee Alison, who hired MacArthur to construct a similar home near Marietta’s historic square. “This is where I grew up and my family still lives here, so it was only natural to settle here.” Keeping the principles of modernism and the enduring quality of English country houses in mind, MacArthur devised a stately residence that’s as nostalgic as it is current.

To give the home modern functionality, MacArthur employed an open-plan kitchen, breakfast area and family room, and positioned the interior bar adjacent to the formal living room, dining room and pool terrace. “You have to think about how the family will move through the house,” says the architect, who incorporated two staircases–one in each arm of the U-shaped plan. “They used to be near the entry, but it doesn’t make sense to come down the stairs and end up at the front door in your pajamas.”

MacArthur took an especially artful approach for the modernist main staircase, which almost “looks like it’s floating,” she says. Looking to renowned architect Sir Edwin Lutyens’ design for England’s Deanery Garden as inspiration, the architect used window walls to help enclose the stairs. In this case, she says, “the stair was not merely a way to get up to another floor but a way to bring light to both levels.” To enhance the references to English country vernacular, she framed the windows with cedar and expressed the stairwell on the exterior by punctuating its brick cladding with cedar and glass.

After general contractor Michael Ladisic was brought on to construct the home, the Rables tapped designer Brian Watford to furnish the interiors. “I’ve known Brian since elementary school, but we fell out of touch after high school,” Lee Alison recounts. “One day I was browsing Pinterest and saw work he had done for a local show house, and I knew instantly he was the right designer for us.” She requested to meet for coffee, and soon the reacquainted schoolmates were shopping for paint colors, furniture and fabrics.

Watford seamlessly connected his interior design to the architecture, suspending a chandelier with bubble-like glass spheres that cascade through the sunlit stairwell. “I played off the modern design of the staircase,” he says. In the interest of more ethereality, he painted the kitchen’s perimeter cabinetry a pale shade of blue, which complements the teal tone used for the island and pantry cabinetry. Says the designer of the similarly saturated high-gloss interior bar: “The lacquer adds a sense of depth you don’t see elsewhere in the house; it makes the space feel like a little jewel box.” This bold treatment tempers the more traditional style of the kitchen, spearheaded by Jane Hollman of Studio Entourage, the branch of MacArthur’s firm focusing on kitchens, bathrooms and other small-scale projects.

In keeping with the color palette Watford had already established, the formal dining room corrals peacock-colored Italian velvet armchairs around an ash wood table and mod metallic chandelier. Watford balanced the home’s blue-green hues by outfitting the breakfast area and living room with cream-colored textiles and warm accents like faux bois and brass. The coved corners of the latter space do well to soften sharp statements made by riveted grass-cloth walls, a kinetic cowhide carpet and sea urchin-shaped ceiling fixture.

“I knew I wanted to push more modern,” says Lee Alison, who expressed slight reservations along the transition from traditional. Despite her reticence, it was Watford’s guidance that urged her to get to the design she really desired. “It was a labor of love in the end and I couldn’t have enjoyed it more–getting back in touch with my old friend and creating such an amazing home for my family.”

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Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway {Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway} – English

Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway {Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway} – English

The post Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It’s a classic renovation tale: A couple buys a Naples, Florida vacation house. It’s ideal for them in the moment—turnkey and kitted out to perfection. A decade or so elapses, and times and needs change. Such was the case for designer Billy Ceglia’s longtime clients. “They looked at moving, at seeing what else was out there because their family had grown,” says Ceglia. “But they loved the location, and the house—it was just dated. They decided to stay, keep the memories, and make it fresh and new and right for their family now.” After two previous projects together, the designer and his clients had built serious trust, so Ceglia had nearly free reign on the house. “The ideal clients understand that they’re hiring professionals, so there are more functional and programming notes,” he observes.

In the revamp, out went the muted, tea-stained palette, bamboo furniture and tropical prints, and in came thoughtfully reworked spaces, tailored silhouettes and flourishes of bold color. “We gave it half a face-lift,” Ceglia says with a laugh. “And touched nearly every surface.” The designer’s efforts are visible outside, where orange barrel tile on the roof was replaced with flat, gray tiles. “It looks a little more like the Italian countryside,” he says. And then, “We painted everything that stood still white,” he says, referring to the now crisp finish on the formerly beige-y precast concrete façade. Ceglia took a similar tack inside, applying a whitewash to the walls. “I don’t like to go against what the outside tells you, so that you think, ‘Wait a minute, did I teleport somewhere else?’ It feels relatable to the exterior and to their lifestyle.” He directed paintbrushes to the architectural details as well. Columns and ceiling beams also received a white coat, and, to heighten that dolce vita vibe, the interiors of the ceiling coffers are blue. “It kept that feeling of open-air space,” notes the designer.

Ceglia kept the interior plan mostly intact. Well laid out, the bathrooms required only cosmetic overhauls, but the kitchen (and the adjacent breakfast area and family room) was a different story. “It had been a giant dead end,” says the designer, “so we took out a peninsula and swapped in a bigger island.” To accommodate the couple’s grandchildren, he created a kid zone there with storage conveniently positioned for little hands to grab paper plates, napkins and snacks. He also removed an existing bar to make way for a multi-person home office, while the family room gained more seating to accommodate their visiting tribe.

Rather than choosing all-white finishes for the kitchen, “We worked with Waterworks to find the palest gray paint for the perimeter cabinets and a stain for the island with a yellow undertone,” explains Ceglia. The latter hue was both an aesthetic and practical decision, as one of the few finishes kept was the travertine flooring. “It would have been a major undertaking to rip it out,” says general contractor Tom Lawrence, “and it was a beautiful element of the house, so why remove it?”

While the kitchen reads neutral, the rest of the open-plan house tells a thoughtfully woven color story. “We wanted it traditional but fresh and youthful, so we chose stronger colors on more classic furniture,” notes Ceglia. In the living room, a deep turquoise fabric with a subtle white ribbon pattern offers up an English-meets-South Florida vibe. “In the dining room, the color mellows and mutes on the host and hostess chairs and whispers in the chinoiserie wall panels,” he notes. The palette picks up steam again in the breakfast room, where a paler turquoise covers the pillows on a set of gray upholstered chairs before making a bigger statement on the family room’s sectional and lounge chair. The boldest expression is found in the vibrant wallcoverings in the turquoise guest room and bath. “We made an S curve that moves your eye through the house,” the designer explains, “When you’re outside looking back in, you see all of those rooms.”

For Ceglia, his clients’ home offers a compelling lesson for others faced with a dated abode. “You can look at this house and realize that you don’t have to start from scratch,” he says. A big part of the equation, though, is making decisions that will hold up in years to come. “I want my clients to do it once and never have to do it again,” the designer shares, “I like to choose classic, wonderful, comfortable things that they won’t tire of.”

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Explore Vineyard Living And Stylish Summer Homes With These 3 Design Books {Explore Vineyard Living And Stylish Summer Homes With These 3 Design Books} – English

Explore Vineyard Living And Stylish Summer Homes With These 3 Design Books {Explore Vineyard Living And Stylish Summer Homes With These 3 Design Books} – English

The post Explore Vineyard Living And Stylish Summer Homes With These 3 Design Books appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

PHOTO COURTESY RIZZOLI

WINE COUNTRY LIVING: HOUSES OF THE WINEMAKING REGIONS OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST by Linda Leigh Paul

Anyone who dreams of vineyard living will want to find a comfy chair and dig into this sumptuous new release, which offers a peek into more than 25 innovative homes and wineries that dot the wine-making regions of California—Napa and Sonoma counties and Carmel—as well as Oregon, Washington State and British Columbia. Discover how noted local architects as well as innovators like Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture and Jim Olson of Olson Kundig are designing contemporary spaces that engage the dramatic coastal landscape while suiting people’s modern lives. rizzolibookstore.com


Office building designed by Studio Gang

PHOTO COURTESY PHAIDON

STUDIO GANG: ARCHITECTURE by Jeanne Gang

For two decades, award-winning architecture firm Studio Gang, led by Jeanne Gang, has taken a research-backed approach to creating imaginative, innovative buildings that address urgent issues such as climate change and inequality. At the root of the firm’s practice is a drive to connect people with their communities and the environment. This book, showcasing 25 remarkable projects, represents the most in-depth exploration of Studio Gang’s work thus far. phaidon.com


Vignette in summer house

PHOTO COURTESY VENDOME PRESS

SUMMER TO SUMMER: HOUSES BY THE SEA by Jennifer Ash Rudick

Dig into this lush volume and be transported to stylish homes that were made for easy summertime living. Summer to Summer is a celebration of the seaside summer home in its varying incarnations, from the century-old charmer to the ultramodern. Writer Jennifer Ash Rudick takes the reader to an intimate cottage in Provincetown; a minimalist, Isamu Noguchi-designed home in Northeast Harbor, Maine; and a Nantucket house by interior designer Tom Scheerer, to name a few. The book features photography by Tria Giovan, whose work has been exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art and the Brooklyn Museum. vendomepress.com

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Once Home To A Croatian Countess, A Bay Area Reno Maintains International Flair {Once Home To A Croatian Countess, A Bay Area Reno Maintains International Flair} – English

Once Home To A Croatian Countess, A Bay Area Reno Maintains International Flair {Once Home To A Croatian Countess, A Bay Area Reno Maintains International Flair} – English

The post Once Home To A Croatian Countess, A Bay Area Reno Maintains International Flair appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The couple hired architect Joo Young Oh to orchestrate a whole-house renovation that would extend it by eight feet in the back to make way for a lower-level media room, a great room adjacent to an enlarged kitchen, more bedroom space upstairs and a roof deck on top. The prevailing imperative at every step was to preserve the original details making the house distinctive–vibrant, locally crafted tile; hand-forged stair rails; decorative plasterwork and trim and whimsically painted ceiling beams. “We didn’t touch any of those,” says Oh, noting general contractor Jay Blumenfeld’s team carefully removed the dining room beams to protect them during construction.

Oh enhanced the connection between new and old spaces with fresh millwork and trim that nods to the originals. “It’s in the same language as the architecture, but we reinterpreted it to be a little bit more modern,” she says. And as she contemplated a stair to the new roof terrace, Oh commissioned an artisan to replicate the existing rails. “The metalwork was beautifully done and flawlessly executed,” she says.

Kim had the walls painted white inside and out to ensure every detail stands out to the best effect. Previously, the walls were colored with a Tuscan yellow-beige hue, she says, “but it wasn’t what the house was telling me it really wanted and it didn’t fit in with its history.” The designer then tapped into her family’s wanderlust as inspiration for the rest of the interior design. When asked about the project’s genesis, she is quick to respond with: “Vacations inspired this home.” It’s a fitting concept since the boats in the marina across the street resemble a Mediterranean setting, one of the family’s favorite destinations.

The upstairs living area could, in fact, be easily mistaken for a luxury lounge in a well-appointed hotel. Her first purchase for the house–a Turkish light fixture dripping with colored globes–hangs among the painted ceiling beams and strikes an exotic note. Oh designed a passageway connecting the space to an adjacent bar area, where Kim installed vintage ice-cream parlor stools that she reupholstered with red leather and fringe to approximate the ones in Rick’s Cafe from the movie Casablanca. An existing covered balcony got an upgrade with steel-framed doors and windows to open up the views of the San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate Bridge. “This room was the inspiration for the whole house,” Kim explains.

The designer chose a vintage Moroccan pendant to hang over the dining-room table, and its filigreed metalwork casts a panoply of shadows and light that can be seen from the street at night, just as the Turkish light’s colored globes glow outward from the second floor. “I have them on when we leave at night because I like to see them when we return,” Kim says. She carried that mystique to the roof deck, which was inspired by top-floor lounges in Marrakesh outfitted with long benches and colorful cushions to accommodate a crowd. Landscape architect Peter Ker Walker designed planters full of colorful succulents to line the back of the built-in seating along one side of the deck. “The plants are low, wind resistant, require little maintenance and don’t restrict the rooftop views,” he says.

For more formal gatherings, Kim revitalized the living room’s original elegance, adding dark hardwood floors and furnishing it with refined midcentury modern Italian pieces. An existing dry bar was reborn as a Champagne bar. The whole look, she says, brings her back to an Italian seaside hotel, the J.K. Place Capri. “That place just really stuck with me,” she explains.

Looking around, the family is reminded of similar unforgettable destinations and romantic locales they’ve visited. “I’ve been captivated by hotel design in far-flung locations–places where they’ve been willing to take risks to evoke a distinct feeling of place,” Kim says. But for this traveling-loving family, coming home isn’t the end of the adventure.

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Inside A Southern Charmer That Balances Masculine Forms With Feminine Touches {Inside A Southern Charmer That Balances Masculine Forms With Feminine Touches} – English

Inside A Southern Charmer That Balances Masculine Forms With Feminine Touches {Inside A Southern Charmer That Balances Masculine Forms With Feminine Touches} – English

The post Inside A Southern Charmer That Balances Masculine Forms With Feminine Touches appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Such was the case for the transformation of a 1925 Tuscan villa in Buckhead, Georgia, Rollins having already bonded with its owner over a mutual love of art. It was only after being welcomed into Rollins’ own Tuxedo Park abode one afternoon for a glass of Champagne that their friendship blossomed into a full-fledged designer-client relationship. “He stood in my entrance hall with his jaw on the floor,” Rollins recalls of that fateful first visit. “In my home, there are layers and layers of texture and color, and every room tells a story of what the next room is going to be.” While the designer admits her talent for a fluid procession of colors and patterns, she thinks it was the conversation-sparking arrangements of art and furniture that won over her client’s confidence in the end. “He felt at home here, and he knew I could replicate that feeling for him,” she explains.

Having not been renovated since the 1990s, the homeowner’s own stucco- and clay tile-clad residence was in dire need of an update. To tone down its dated, ornate interiors, Rollins ousted the heavy textiles and faux-finished walls in favor of a soft, neutral scheme. The result is a lighter, airier take on Italianate that Rollins says “channels David Adler, Frances Elkins and old-school Montecito”—but still feels right at home in the heart of Buckhead.

Recently retired from his law practice and a newly single father, the client naturally gravitated toward strong, masculine furniture silhouettes. At the same time, though, top of mind was ensuring his two teenage daughters would feel equally at home. So, Rollins split the difference between the two styles, balancing masculine forms with feminine touches.

In the master bedroom, where the homeowner originally wanted a sleigh bed, Rollins instead placed a four-poster. “It would have blocked the views,” she says, noting how its clean lines are tempered by softly skirted tables at the bedside. “A lot of guys are afraid of skirted furniture because they think it is going to look too feminine, but I’m a big believer that furniture should be a mix of skirts and legs; plus they’re done in a way that he can lift them up for extra storage.” To add a handsome touch to the home, Rollins brought in supple, saddle-colored leathers, but she was sure to contrast them with florid textiles—animal prints, ikats, florals. In his daughters’ rooms, especially, “it was about letting them have a style and a voice of their own in their personal spaces,” Rollins explains. “One picked a Sister Parish print, which just thrilled me.”

Rollins was also keen to give her client the color flow that had so captured his attention in her home. Since the newly pale, neutral walls happened to provide the perfect gallery-like setting for his extensive collection of art, Rollins started there: with a mixed-media work by Cuban artist Alejandro Aguilera at the entryway. Its vibrant azure is reiterated numerous times throughout the house, helping the eye to travel. Similarly, in the dining room, a commanding abstract by Radcliffe Bailey inserts strokes of scarlet that appear throughout the home on everything from garden stools to sculpture, while in the breakfast area an entrancing photograph by Abelardo Morell ties the interior to the outside world. “It’s a scene of a garden done in camera obscura,” Rollins explains. “I love the way windows wrap all around this space, then you have this incredible art piece that’s like looking out a window. It really is so unbelievably beautiful.”

To enhance the already established gardens—lush with English ivy, clipped Korean boxwood hedges, needle palms and climbing vines—Rollins teamed up with landscape designer Marc Galbraith to tame the European-esque courtyards, terraces and pool area with new plantings of Southern-staple flowering shrubs: hydrangea, azalea, gardenia, tea olive and Knock Out white roses, among them. To frame a momentous view of the pool, she placed a pair of Boston ferns in terra-cotta pots.

And with such an entrancing environment right out the back door, there were telltale details no self-professed Southern hostess would overlook: opportunities for outdoor living and entertaining. Rollins’ thoughtful furniture placements and color play create a comfortable flow from the living room to the terrace, the kitchen and, ultimately, the sunroom-cum-library—where the client reads the newspaper over coffee every morning.

For the avid oenophile, this room is an excellent place to enjoy wine in the evenings, as well as cocktails—especially since Rollins provided the perfect rattan bar cart for concocting them. Adds the designer of the ongoing visits with her friend, “We typically have Negronis—he makes the best.

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