A Chicago Couple Trades French Country For Fresh And Functional {A Chicago Couple Trades French Country For Fresh And Functional} – English

A Chicago Couple Trades French Country For Fresh And Functional {A Chicago Couple Trades French Country For Fresh And Functional} – English

The post A Chicago Couple Trades French Country For Fresh And Functional appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


That was the predicament Steve Somogyi and Filip Malyszko’s clients faced when they inquired about doing a light refresh of their 1950s ranch in Palos Heights, Illinois. The design duo was already working with the couple on plans for a family compound in Michigan. However, the wife had their current residence on her mind when she asked, “‘Can you help us by painting and adding new window treatments?’” Malyszko recalls.

The house bore a strong French country influence with carved wood, cherry floors and a color palette of burgundy, gold, black and deep green. “It was decorated to the nines, but very fancy and traditional,” Malyszko says. “Everything was perfectly coordinated—the drapes matched the pillow trim.” Somogyi got right to the point and, according to Malyszko, told the clients, “‘This is going to take a lot more than a paint job. It isn’t a real representation of who you are and where you are in your life.’”

The couple couldn’t have agreed more. With their children now in high school and college, they were ready for a drastic change. The Michigan residence got put on the back burner, and the Chicagoland abode became the focus. “Make it light and bright,” the wife told the designers. “Our goal was for the space to be more functional for the way we live every day,” she says.

The duo began with reimagining the great room. Working with general contractor James Corso, they built out the roof and added steel supports that bring attention to the voluminous space. The limestone fireplace, adorned with salvaged-steel artwork, also helps to draw the eye up to the 14-foot peak. “We completely blew off the ceiling and reshaped the roof,” Malyszko explains. “The project went from decoration to renovation.” A skylight so large it had to be craned in piece-by-piece floods the space with light, allowing the designers to paint the walls a deep ebony. “It was transformative,” Malyszko says. For furnishings, they replaced the couple’s collection of dark and ornate pieces with clean-lined selections. An oversize coffee table holds center court while custom sofas modeled after the family’s old ones provide all the seating the couple needs to entertain a slew of visitors.

This love of hosting also facilitated the decision to flip the dining room to the front of the house, allowing for a commodious custom dining table that easily accommodates 12 guests. Overhead hangs a dramatic multipendant light fixture that stretches the length of the table. “It’s the first thing you see,” Malyszko says. “It has wonderful movement. The glow of the handblown glass pieces is spectacular.”

The removal of a partial wall that blocked the flow between the kitchen and current sitting area of the great room also makes for easier entertaining. As does the new kitchen of the wife’s dreams, complete with streamlined cabinetry, a custom hood and a live-edge breakfast table with banquette seating offering a cozy spot for informal meals.

In another clever move, the designers created a new entry by enclosing part of the covered front porch and barrel-vaulting the ceiling. They retained the texture-rich limestone of what used to be an exterior wall and turned the space into a darling vignette with a chain-leg console topped by an arched mirror and plaster lamp, all set aglow by natural light streaming in from the adjacent window. Now one of the most chic spaces in the house, the foyer has a strong indoor-outdoor connection that makes it feel like a three-season room.

Each revamped space flows together naturally, thanks to the overall palette of materials. “We wanted to unify the residence so that each room blends together from one area to the next,” Malyszko says. “There is a mixture of textures, neutral colors, contrast and subtle patterns making each space unique, but not jarring.”

Post-renovation, the owners are grateful that they decided to stay in the dwelling that has nurtured their family for more than 20 years. Says the wife, “They literally turned the house into our dream home.”

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Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

The post Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Hotel appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Exterior of hotel in Aspen with wood siding

Travelers ready to return to Aspen’s slopes have a sophisticated new lodging option to consider this year.

Aspen Street Lodge offers the look and feel of a private home with amenities that only a luxury hotel can offer, from a resident chef and mountain guide to painting sessions with acclaimed Aspen artist Kelly Peters.

Designed by local architecture firm Forum Phi and built by Madigan + Company, the eco-conscious building—located on the central-Aspen site previously occupied by the Hotel Lenado—is clad with stone and charred cedar chosen to mimic the bark of aspen trees.

Inside, designer Debra Owens gave the nine lodge rooms, two-bedroom penthouse apartment and intimate common spaces a “modern industrial feel with a luxe twist,” she says, by juxtaposing white Venetian plaster walls against warm wood and blackened-steel finishes, and clean-lined furnishings by Poliform, Holly Hunt, Liaigre and Cassina with chunky fabrics, shearlings and leathers.

Sculptural lighting from Apparatus, Roll & Hill and RBW illuminates artful wallcoverings, including hand-painted Porter Teleo designs, “creating a tactile and visually stunning place to relax and recharge,” Owens says. For its first full ski season, the lodge will offer full buyouts only.

PHOTO BY DRAPER WHITE, COURTESY ASPEN STREET LODGE

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Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges {Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges} – English

Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges {Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges} – English

The post Behind Its Old-World Façade, A Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When a couple decided their Palm Beach vacation home needed a modest refresh, they asked their longtime interior designer, Kelly Anthony, to help select new options for the walls and flooring. But comparing paint swatches quickly turned into something much more. “We studied the house for a bit, and I said, ‘I’ve got good news, and I’ve got bad news,’” Anthony told her clients. “‘The good news is I’m not going to change one thing. The bad news is I’m going to change everything.”

Nearly a decade earlier, Anthony had designed the dwelling’s previous iteration, which featured a classic Palm Beach style. This time, however, she envisioned a clean, modern take on the island’s aesthetic, with an open, light-filled plan. Achieving this would require a full gut renovation, so she partnered with general contractor Jason Willoughby as well as Matthew Quinn of Design Galleria Kitchen and Bath Studio to help transform the structure inside and outside.

First on the agenda was overhauling the layout of the main floor. “It had a real Mediterranean vibe—so a lot of confined spaces and darker rooms,” Willoughby recalls. “Everything was kind of sectioned off.” The walls dividing the kitchen, dining area, living room and loggia all came down, creating a long, beautifully flowing space leading to the back courtyard. The general contractor installed steel-framed windows and doors along the back wall to bring in more natural light as well as views of the plunge pool and elegant grounds in the modest courtyard by landscape architect Dustin M. Mizell. “We made a really small space feel more gracious,” says Mizell, who added plantings such as Senegal date palm, yellow tabebuia and jasmine vines. Two dining areas offer ample space for entertaining, and the wine room now functions as a bar thanks to a new pass-through window into the living area. “Once we connected all the spaces and opened up the back of the house, it took on a completely different personality,” Anthony says.

Quinn, meanwhile, worked his magic in the kitchen. To create a sleek space that complements the rest of the architecture, he cleverly hid appliances and gadgets behind retractable doors and deep drawers. Monochromatic materials such as rift-cut oak cabinets, Cristallo quartzite and deep chocolate-hued wood floors set a sophisticated tone. “It was really about creating a space where somebody could cook a meal if they wanted to, but mostly it was a beautiful space,” Quinn says.

Outside, Anthony and Willoughby intended to smooth the exterior’s textured stucco façade and replace the barrel tile roof with a charcoal flat one. But the town’s architectural commission denied the plans, because several nearby residences were being built in a similar transitional style. Instead, they found other ways to modernize the old world style exterior, including introducing a glass- and-steel front door, a motor court and a ribbon driveway. In the end, “we feel the direction the board made us go in actually provided for more of a unique home,” Willoughby reflects. “We kept some of the traditional elements, which give it that real Palm Beach vibe. Then when you walk inside, it wows you even more.”

Simply opening the front door of the Mediterranean-style façade unveils a dramatic surprise: a modern hallway enveloped in crisp white walls and lined with veined marble flooring. Throughout the interior, Anthony pursued a contemporary color palette dominated by black, white and gray, with neutral pops of ivory. As a nod to the wife, who designs clothes, she channeled fashion influence in each space, incorporating Chanel-inspired bouclé, art with a sartorial spin and jewelry-like light fixtures. “She likes things to be feminine, elegant,” the interior designer says of the wife, “but she also likes a bit of glitter and glam.”

Sculptural and curvy furnishings inject an enticing level of comfort, countering some of the dwelling’s more commanding features—like the dark gray linen wing chairs that play off the living area’s striking black marble fireplace, the bar room’s low-slung beige sectional that balances graphic wall art and the rounded velvet sofa that hugs the marble breakfast table. But the coziest space, rightfully so, is the primary bedroom. “We wanted to make the room feel like it was enveloped in fabric,” Anthony says. “The space feels very clean, open and bright.” With the backdrop of a gray marble fireplace, she warmed the room even more with nubby seating, a plush rug and a channel-set vinyl headboard wall, all in neutral shades.

By the end of the renovation, Anthony was proved correct: The team had indeed changed not one thing but rather everything. And that, it turns out, includes the desires of the residents. “They trusted us to give them what they didn’t even know they wanted,” she says.

The post Behind Its Old-World Façade, A Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In a house like this, everything is in service to nature and that view, and informed by it as well,” says designer Kimille Taylor of the Telluride abode she and architect Steve Morton, who also happens to be her husband, recently completed for a couple who divide their time between Colorado and Arizona. Together with general contractor Paul Ricks, Taylor and Morton crafted a residence that respects its extraordinary setting and frames mountain vistas from every room. Inside, spaces are airy yet cozy and cater to the owners’ favorite pastimes: painting, woodworking, reading and cooking.

“The clients wanted an exciting plan for a clean, contemporary dwelling with glass walls that open to the outdoors,” notes Morton. Situated on the north side of the valley, it made sense to extend the house wide, like outstretched wings, to take in southerly views and sunshine. The resulting shape “felt like it wanted to take flight,” says the architect, who nicknamed the house “Soaring Eagle.” “The home’s forms mimic a large wingspan and a tail section, and the raised center intersection can be viewed as the head,” he explains. “The perspective and views afforded by the site feel like soaring above the ground below.” Without knowing it, he tapped into a spirit already captured in the couple’s art collection. Serendipitously, hanging in their Arizona home was a large Rebecca Kinkead painting of a soaring bald eagle. “Needless to say, it’s been relocated to Telluride,” adds Morton.

“The house has low-slung, horizontal lines—it’s bold in its simplicity,” the architect continues. “I tend to pare down ornamentation and create something more poetic and understated.” Morton is also driven by “a responsibility to respect nature,” and wrapped the home in silvery-hued stone and cedar siding. Adding integrated planters around the structure offered additional thermal benefits, and tufted-grass plantings visually nestle the dwelling into the land. “It treads lightly, and it has a quiet strength,” he says. Because the clients wanted “an edited style,” Morton worked closely with Taylor to select exterior materials that could continue inside for a cohesive feel. “The result is a soft, warm materiality,” he notes.

“These clients didn’t want to be limited by anything cliché,” says Taylor, who divides her practice between Manhattan and Telluride. “You see a lot of the same things in the mountain decorating world, so we wanted something fresh.” For an element of fun, she found a living room coffee table composed of a glass top that rests on cedar “boulders,” some of which are movable. “It brings a bit of wit to the space,” she says. Organic forms also inspired the table Taylor created for the dining room. “It’s sculptural and breaks up the rectilinear forms of that main living area,” the designer explains.

More uncommon pieces were discovered during marathon shopping trips in Manhattan. “They’d come to New York, and I’d take them out from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. We spent many days like that, and it was such fun,” says Taylor. As a result, the home contains pieces from Liaigre and Apparatus mixed with unique finds from local shops. All these pieces exist against a varied palette. “There are probably 15 different colors present—shades of blue, gray, stone, cream, parchment, camel, brown, taupe and a little maroon,” notes the designer. “This complexity is what makes it successful, along with a lot of textural layering.”

To fulfill the couple’s wish list, Taylor and Morton created two primary suites flanking the public areas (one for the clients and one for his daughter) and additional guest rooms downstairs. They also designed an art studio and a woodshop, as well as a library loft. But it’s the kitchen that anchors the house. “It had to work,” stresses Taylor. “They love to cook, bake and entertain, so we took a long time perfecting the space’s functionality.” An exposed stone wall not only creates continuity with the exterior, but also imbues the space with a sense of age—the kind the designer says you find in old Italian dwellings.

“Everything adds up to their overall quality of life here,” Taylor observes. And when the glass doors open to the fresh air and sunshine—even in winter—the house truly does seem to soar.

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The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun {The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun} – English

The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun {The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun} – English

The post The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

The words, “I want to have a little fun with this house,” are music to a designer’s ears. And that’s exactly what Peter Dunham’s client said upon hiring him to craft the interiors of the Whitefish, Montana, vacation home she shares with her husband. To Dunham, “fun” meant playing to the expansive lake views from the residence’s hillside location. It also meant going a bit wild, blending elements from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, and layering with art and handmade pieces. “I’ve never done this particular look for another client in this environment and context,” he says. “It’s very much tailored to their style and the locale.”

The clients emphasized the importance of respecting the surrounding environment. To speak to the local vernacular, Dunham recommended residential designer Larry Pearson. He was familiar with Pearson’s work and confident that he could create the contemporary but relaxed vibe the couple was looking for yet stay true to the setting. “We love regional materials,” notes Pearson, who worked with general contractor Kelcey Bingham to incorporate recycled timber and Montana moss rock. “The exterior color scheme and materials blend into the setting,” adds Bingham. A sense of place was top of mind for landscape architect Kurt Vomfell as well. “The goal was to reflect the character of Montana,” says Vomfell. He points to the native and near-native plantings he used that “feel like they were found in a meadow here.”

While the team wanted the residence to fit in, they also wanted it to be aesthetically interesting. So, Pearson flipped the script on a classic lake house. A guest house was erected at the top of the hill, with the main house set below. The entry from the motor court leads to a foyer from which a stone staircase descends into the social spaces at lake level. “This is a home that touches the water,” Pearson says. “So, you’re engaging with the lake.”

A contemporary style was important, but, Pearson asserts, an ultra-sleek modern home was never his goal. It was important, he says, “that you can take your shoes off, walk down to the beach, jump in a boat and come back in soaking wet.” Adds Dunham: “It was much more about organic modernism. Larry was very invested in how his design was working between these materials. You’ve got really beautiful stonework, woodwork, hand-troweled plasterwork and iron elements that he brought in.”

Since the clients didn’t want what Dunham calls “a serious, monochromatic house,” he incorporated color but carefully considered its usage. “The outside view is stunning with the shades of blue and gray-blue. When the lake goes bright, it’s green,” he says. “You’ve got the green of the trees and the colors of the mountains. So those are what you want to celebrate.” The designer worked in verdant tones through furnishings such as teal pendants in the kitchen, a sea-green sofa in the foyer and light green swivel chairs in the living room. Varying shades of sand that nod to the beach set the backdrop.

When Dunham did choose to use other colors—mixing in burnt-orange and saffron-yellow dining chairs among the blue and green ones; designing a sectional upholstered in a pumpkin-colored chenille for the sitting room—he kept them muted rather than bright and intended for them to support the vibrant art. “A lot of the art is quite fresh,” Dunham says. “You didn’t want to put up works that felt sludgy.”

To this end, he hung a vintage tapestry prominently in the dining room. Its black background and bold colors contribute an eye-catching graphic quality and a bit of drama, while the textile itself mutes noise and adds softness against the stone walls and steel-framed windows. The result: A room where dinners last for hours, thanks also to the generously scaled chairs covered in a stain-proof leather that is “semi-indestructible,” says Dunham.

This isn’t the only room for gatherings. The entire house is designed for groups. There’s the cozy nook in the living area warmed by a fireplace—the perfect spot for card games—the inviting orange sectional and the many seating areas out on the deck. Which is precisely the point, Dunham muses. “I look back, and I see the picture over the lake or the chairs around the fire pit and think, ‘that’s somewhere I’d like to be.’ ”

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Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home {Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home} – English

Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home {Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home} – English

The post Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Thanks to its setting on an 18-hole championship golf course and the surrounding McDowell Sonoran Preserve, Silverleaf is one of Scottsdale’s most coveted neighborhoods, boasting enviable views from any vantage point. But few are more iconic than that from the lot upon which a Colorado couple built their family vacation abode.

“It’s one of only three homes on the sixth fairway with due southwest orientation,” notes general contractor Anthony Salcito Jr. “It’s really the best lot in Silverleaf.” With its stunning vistas of the golf course, valley and mountains, the property was indeed so special that the couple decided to buy it, despite the house not being to their taste. “The existing house was sitting too low on the site and aligned in the wrong direction,” Anthony recalls. “The more elevated you are, the more you capture the views, so in order to do that, the whole house needed to be realigned.” In a bold move, the couple decided to tear down the house, bringing on Anthony, his designer wife Rebecca Salcito, architect Erik Peterson and landscape architect Jeff Berghoff to construct their getaway from the ground up. “This is one of the most special lots in Silverleaf, almost as good as being on the ocean,” Peterson says. “You have to know a lot is worth it when someone purchases a home and tears it down.”

“Capturing views of the valley, desert and spectacular Scottsdale sunsets from virtually every room in the house was our top priority,” says the husband. Though the couple are technically empty nesters, their adult daughters frequently return home for visits, so they sought an expansive gathering place for the whole family to seek refuge from the cold Colorado winters. They also wanted ample space for entertaining their friends, many of whom share the couple’s passion for golf.

Peterson drew upon the current trends in Los Angeles (he has a satellite office in Beverly Hills), conceiving a modern Mediterranean-style dwelling, mixing old- and new-world materials—think a limestone exterior, Douglas-fir beams, steel windows and tile roofs. “We had to fight to be allowed to do this style in Silverleaf, which was new and unprecedented at the time, and now everyone in the community wants it,” Peterson laughs. Of course, there’s something else everyone wants—those desert views. And Peterson brought them in spades. The width and orientation of the lot enabled him to give most of the spaces—even the exercise room—key sight lines west, capturing views of both the golf course and those famous Arizona sunsets. “If you don’t like to work out then this room will change that,” he remarks.

“We wanted it to feel like a resort,” notes Rebecca. To this end, Peterson chose towering steel windows that either pocket away or slide open, enabling the walls to virtually disappear, creating a seamless transition outside. There—set off by Berghoff’s landscaping—large, covered patios with a multitude of seating areas, cabanas, fire pits and a dazzling infinity pool bring that resort feel to life. Completing the vibe is a sprawling outdoor bar made of onyx, backlit to create a dramatic focal point. “It’s the biggest bar we’ve ever put in a home,” Rebecca observes.

For the interiors, however, the designer chose a more understated look. With plenty of stone and wall treatments peppered throughout for texture (a Kyle Bunting hide wallcovering on the stairwell and a shield-like metallic kitchen backsplash, for example), Rebecca opted for crisp white walls and a neutral palette. Working with Cheryl Lucas, a designer who works for the homeowners, she created a warm relaxed vibe, echoing the desert surroundings. The soft tones also serve as the perfect backdrop to the owners’ art collection. “They love bright, colorful art and I didn’t want anything to compete with that,” Rebecca explains.

While the decision to tear down and build anew may have been a risk, the house is decidedly worthy of its prominent location. “It is pretty fabulous when a project of this scope comes together so well,” says the husband. And the neighborhood locals agree. “It’s definitely one of the favorite homes on the golf course,” Rebecca says. “All the golfers comment on it. It’s spectacular.”

In the light-filled entry of this Silverleaf home, designer Rebecca Salcito selected a hide wall treatment by Kyle Bunting to provide textural contrast to the open-glass stair rail. The custom hair-on-hide rug from Atlanta-based Moattar adds a pop of color.

The post Say ‘Hello’ To Resort-Style Living At This Desert Mediterranean Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Crush On This L.A. Design Feed All About Spaces Meant To Be Enjoyed {Crush On This L.A. Design Feed All About Spaces Meant To Be Enjoyed} – English

Crush On This L.A. Design Feed All About Spaces Meant To Be Enjoyed {Crush On This L.A. Design Feed All About Spaces Meant To Be Enjoyed} – English

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FEED TO FOLLOW: @simodesign

WHO: Sam Gnatovich and Alexi Rennalls are the husband-and-wife team behind L.A. design-build studio Simo Design. Known for melding an appreciation for the past with contemporary styling, they define one current project as “a midcentury pavilion meets old-world European villa.”

WHAT: Their posts capture the cohesion of their projects (from historic renovations to new builds) and often include outdoor spaces. The couple firmly believes that having an outdoor area devoted to enjoyment—be it a cabana, a dining area or a fire pit—helps their clients take better advantage of the Southern California climate.

WHY: Gnatovich and Rennalls aim to share images that convey the narrative of their projects, preferring to tell the whole story of how a project unfolds rather than just show the end result.

IN HER WORDS: “We always try to be authentic in our design approach. Authentic to ourselves and to the spaces. Hopefully, our feed reflects that,” says Rennalls.

PHOTOS COURTESY ALEXIS ROULETTE (THE SOCIETY GROUP)

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A Wilmette Home Delivers On A Wish For A More Laid-Back Lifestyle {A Wilmette Home Delivers On A Wish For A More Laid-Back Lifestyle} – English

A Wilmette Home Delivers On A Wish For A More Laid-Back Lifestyle {A Wilmette Home Delivers On A Wish For A More Laid-Back Lifestyle} – English

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With wide porches and romantic gables, it’s easy to see why the all-American Shingle-style house endures. For one young family leaving Chicago for lakeside life in Wilmette, the details of that style were exactly what they wanted. An outdoorsy couple with two young children, they loved the style’s traditional yet casual leanings: less Champagne and chandeliers and more whiskey-warm nights by the fire after days spent outside. “We didn’t want our home to be like a museum,” says the wife. “We wanted practical and comfortable.”

To build their vision from scratch, they turned to designer Ilene Chase, architect H. Gary Frank and builder Richard Bondarowicz. Consensus grew quickly on how to interpret the iconic features—beginning with the exterior, which fully embraced the form’s innate eclecticism. “Shingle homes can use a wide array of elements,” explains Frank, who incorporated classic gables, a turret (topped with a weather vane) and a gently curved roofline arching over the entrance. “Having that curve allows the façade to undulate a little bit, so it’s not so flat. It creates a nice, soft feel for the home.”

These personable touches continued inside, as the couple never felt beholden to the expected way of doing things, says Chase. “So in each room, we didn’t just stick with one style. There’s a little bit of each thing they love.” The finishes reflected this diverse taste, with the incorporation of rustic, mountain-inspired materials honoring the couple’s love of Colorado. “We kept very traditional aspects,” explains Chase. “But there was a Western presence they wanted to include, with a lot of organic elements.” The contrast proves striking with crisp crown molding, and baseboards and paneling that feel surprisingly fresh against hand-scraped oak floors (the team spent hours testing for “just the right color that had some warmth and wear to it,” says Chase). A colorful striped runner adds levity to the staircase, with tones that “are playful, yet still warm and earthy,” she adds.

The juxtaposition continues in the kitchen and breakfast area, where white beams stand out against naturally stained white oak panels on the ceiling. “We laid out the pattern painstakingly,” shares Bondarowicz about the process. “We did several mock-ups so that the proportions were appropriate.” For the kitchen island, extra care (and 10 men) was also needed to install the honed Madre Perla quartzite. It’s the perfect counterpoint to the custom classic cabinetry by Abruzzo Kitchen and Bath, “as it’s not polished and shiny, so you can see the imperfections,” says the wife.

Some choices were pragmatic. They embraced the Shingle style’s extra-wide hallways “because you know kids, they just crash into things,” jokes the husband. Other areas were reimagined completely, adapting the style and purpose of each room to best suit the family. Most of all, the couple wanted to avoid overly formal spaces that would lie fallow. “We were trying to eliminate those rooms you only use on Christmas Eve,” the husband notes. This explains the not-so-traditional dining room featuring black-and-white wallpaper and dark furnishings, including the custom table made extra wide to accommodate more people. Bold, graphic and pragmatic, the space proved engaging without feeling too precious.

Though an avid book lover, the husband also didn’t want the library to be a solitary space meant just for reading. “He had the idea of doing this library-meets-cocktail-room,” shares the wife. “Instead of a formal living area where no one sits, how about a space where adults can hang out?” Chase took inspiration from old-school speakeasies that recalled the couple’s life in Chicago, complete with a leather Chesterfield-style sofa, smoky gray wallpaper on the ceiling and deep hunter green on the walls and bookcases. “It’s a little bit moody,” says the designer. “It has a city vibe that they could escape to within this North Shore home.” The speakeasy wouldn’t feel complete without a whiskey bar, placed nearby in the front hallway, borrowing the same mood with dark walnut cabinets and an antique mirror backsplash. The unusual feature harkens back to “a more traditional style, when people would entertain in their foyers,” notes Chase.

The level of detail possible when building a home surprised the couple. “I had no idea,” the wife laughs. “Now I know all about hinges and grout colors that I would have never known in a million years.” The process, however, soon became more than construction—it was about creating spaces that looked back at their life together, while making room for their family’s future.

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Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior {Fall For The Rustic Glam Of This CO Pad With A Fairytale Exterior} – English

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Anyone who has spent time looking at houses on Colorado’s Front Range is familiar with a certain design vernacular, defined by large-scale interior architecture and many layers of wood finishes. Such was the aesthetic of this Castle Pines home when Ed and Ashley Brown first purchased it. “We loved the exterior; it looked like Snow White could live there,” Ashley says. And because the residence offered the amenities they wanted—including fantastic views and a location right on the Castle Pines Golf Club, for Ed’s favorite hobby—the Browns bought it and turned it over to their design team, led by Mark Tremblay.

Tremblay had six months to transform what he calls “a typical lodge-like home” into something brighter and more contemporary. “We had to be mindful of what we should remove and what we should leave alone because it already worked,” he says. “The house was in great shape and the owners liked the layout, so we didn’t have structural changes to make, which allowed us to focus on interior scale, finishes and fixtures.”

To that end, his team—including senior project managers Melissa Adair and Rachel Ortiz, who oversaw the interior detailing—squared up a sea of dated arches that defined the interior doorways and revamped a series of stodgy fireplaces that were too large for the rooms they occupied. The designers also removed nonstructural columns in the entry and the basement that chopped up visual lines through the home. By simplifying the architecture, Tremblay’s team created a clean backdrop.

“We really had to ‘de-wood’ the place,” Tremblay says, by which he means that the team deployed multiple strategies—including staining, painting or replacing the wood. In Ashley’s office, for example, the team reworked the built-ins by removing shelves and adding a mirrored backing. Across the room, an elegant marble-and-steel fireplace surround balances the look. “Keeping original elements was important to us all,” Tremblay adds, noting that simply staining ceiling beams darker, and therefore removing yellow undertones, preserved the textural charm of such details while bringing the space up to date.

Only two spaces got a complete overhaul: the primary bathroom and the basement. A warren of small, oddly shaped spaces prior to the renovation, the primary bath was gutted and reimagined as a contemporary oasis with his-and-her bronze- framed shower enclosures and a handsome copper tub. A shimmery copper screen hangs behind the makeup vanity, making “the most beautiful place for Ashley to sit and start her day,” Adair says. The basement bar area—which, before the work started, resembled an Olive Garden restaurant— became a contemporary entertaining space after Tremblay’s team removed wood floors and cabinetry and a stone arch above the wine cellar door. In their place, handsome black cabinets and modern glass-and-metal shelving—all atop a sleek honed limestone flooring—create a gorgeous space for the Browns to entertain.

Throughout, layers of textural finishes and decor make the rooms feel both cozy and elegant. Upholstered furniture in tactile linens, velvets and leathers, in mostly muted hues with shades of blue woven smartly into the mix, make for pleasing scenes. “We pulled furniture from countless lines,” Tremblay says, “which helps make the interiors endure the test of time.” Carefully selected wall treatments, such as the metallic raffia wallpaper in the basement living area and the painted walls with gold-leaf detail in the primary bedroom, are stylistic counterpoints to the warm white walls throughout most of the home. Against these ideal backdrops hang exquisite, sculptural light fixtures. “Our philosophy on lighting is ‘the bigger, the better,’” Tremblay laughs. “We found unique pieces, and nearly every room has one that takes your breath away.” His favorite: the Skakuff fixture that extends into the entry from the second floor.

Outside, the architecture remains entirely unchanged—enhanced only by fresh paint on the stucco, a light editing of the landscaping, and a contemporary stone sculpture by the Phillips Collection. While the Browns live primarily in Florida, the Colorado summers draw them to the Centennial State, where they relish their new pad’s fresh style and the opportunity to entertain, indoors and out. “When it’s just Ed and me, the home feels livable and cozy,” Ashley says. “But when we have company, the space is magnificent for entertaining. We use—and love—every space in this house.”

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A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style {A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style} – English

A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style {A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style} – English

The post A Georgian-Style Greenwich Estate with Classic Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When a globetrotting couple from Russia decided to put down roots in Greenwich, Connecticut, they wanted the kind of elegant home that would fit in as beautifully in the suburbs as it would in the English countryside. So, they turned to local architect Douglas VanderHorn to craft an impressive Georgian residence that would transcend its location. “They wanted a gracious estate that would make a more formal statement,” says VanderHorn. “We decided to go with a traditional Georgian style because it’s internationally recognized for its handsome, timeless aesthetic.”

The resulting manse is a study in breathtaking symmetry, with a serious brick façade accented with limestone quoins and chimney caps. And though VanderHorn and his team researched the classic 18th-century Georgian estates of master architects for inspiration before starting the project, his own interpretation also manages to embrace fresh, modern style—something he accomplished by simply paring down. “In general, you don’t want too much of a good thing,” he says with a laugh. “A Georgian home in the 1700s would have had a lot more detailing, but we didn’t want to overdo it. We didn’t want the moments of architectural interest to become visual clutter.”

Despite demonstrating restraint, however, VanderHorn’s mark is felt throughout the interiors—from the expansive Palladian windows and heavy molding to the intricate plaster cornices and arched openings. All of this set a luxe backdrop when it came time for designer Inson Wood to put the finishing touches on the interiors: a job made infinitely easier by the incredible material palette. Tumbled Botticino marble on the floors in the entry foyer and white statuary marble fabricated by Chesney’s on the surrounds of each of the seven fireplaces contribute to the old-world feel, while cerused white-oak flooring elsewhere offers a contemporary feel. “Every material has a very interesting texture,” Wood says. “There are almost no flat or smooth surfaces. I wanted the pieces I selected to feel the same way, so I tried to cultivate a hand-warped and natural feel.”

Even the Venetian plaster used on the walls in the center reception area, for example, has been hand-waxed and formulated with gold dust. “It’s a shimmer that you can barely see, but it adds warmth to the white walls,” Wood explains. “The effect is fancy and elaborate yet also very subtle.” Columns distinguish the reception area from the open dining and living areas on either side. In lieu of walls, a pair of glass screens provides a sense of separation without sacrificing the flow of light. “The living, sitting and dining rooms are open in this fantastic space, which lends itself very well to cocktail parties where people are wandering about,” Wood says.

In the dining room, modern artwork and simple Swedish furnishings complement the comfortable, contemporary pieces and neutral palette of the adjacent living area. In the more intimate spaces, colorful antique rugs, ornate French and Russian furnishings, and pieces from the owners’ existing collection are combined seamlessly. “Many times we create these historical mansions to be period-perfect,” Wood says. “In reality, however, people from those times would have included pieces from a number of countries and eras.”

Indeed, in the wife’s elegant sitting room, inspired by a 17th-century French chateau, gilded moldings and crystal chandeliers are joined by an eclectic Buddha head that rests atop an antique Biedermeier desk. On the other end of the spectrum, too, is the husband’s office, where African masks and trophies from his many safaris sit peaceably alongside a handsome desk and a Chippendale cabinet. “It was important that they each have their own space,” Wood says. “They both have very good taste. They are an international family that has traveled widely and experienced many different cultures, and that is what is represented in the design of their home.”

This article originally appeared in the Winter 2015 New York issue of Luxe Interiors + Design.

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