A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start {A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start} – English

A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start {A Couple Builds A New Home For A Fresh Start} – English

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Architect William Duff joined the couple for many backyard discussions, trying to figure out if it was possible to do their future life justice by merely reconfiguring their longtime home, which he describes as an “unremarkable” 1950s tract house. “Taking into consideration their wish list, we decided it would be best not to ‘Frankenstein’ the home by simply grafting new stuff onto it,” says Duff. All agreed it was better to tear down the old home and start from scratch.

Of the designs for the new house drafted by Duff and his team, architects Jim Westover and Michelle Liu, it was a three-level dwelling with a distinctive butterfly roof–a Le Corbusier hallmark of postwar American residential architecture–that resonated most with the homeowners. “That asymmetrical wing span is a very compelling way to give the home distinction, expression and energy,” says Duff.

But the design’s sentimental high note is the courtyard–an exalted version of the one found in the wife’s ancestral home in India, which also featured a solitary tree. “We both have immigrant backgrounds–my husband was born and raised in Ireland–and we wanted our home to integrate elements from our cultural heritages,” says the wife.

When the accordion glass walls enclosing the rooms flanking the central outdoor space–living room on one side, family room on the other–are folded away, the area becomes the heart of the home. “The landscape was designed to create a seamless transition from the indoors to the outdoor living spaces,” says landscape architect Richard Radford. “We blurred the lines between the two, and expanded the home’s living area into the garden environment.” On sunshine-drenched days, the family–who, by the time the house was completed, had added two children–moves effortlessly through this indoor-outdoor expanse, with ipe decking that’s nearly flush with the white-oak planks inside to make a smooth surface for tricycle wheels and small bare feet. At dusk, this area is particularly magical, thanks to Duff’s minimalist approach to illumination. A few strategically placed up-lights and recessed lighting are designed to let the pretty twilight take precedence over high wattage man-made lights. “I didn’t want anything distracting you from feeling the openness and cleanliness of the space,” says the architect.

When it came to the interiors, designer Robbie McMillan took a “less-is-more” strategy. “That meant incorporating fewer pieces of furniture, which are larger in scale, to anchor the rooms, as well as working with a range of textures and materials to provide an organic warmth and softness to each space,” he says. The concept is illustrated in the family room, where a low-backed sectional with strong lines and a chunky-wood coffee table are able to hold their own in the high-ceilinged space. “The rooms demand furniture groupings with clean lines and a sense of weight and volume to define themselves,” McMillan says. The designer opted for low seating to accommodate clear views to the backyard.

Dinner parties usually start in the living room, next to the fireplace that’s clad in lava stone slabs that jut out at different lengths and angles, both for textural interest (a counterpoint to the smooth floors and low, sleek profiles of the furniture) and visual drama (the shadows created when light washes on the surface of the hearth give the room’s otherwise quiet demeanor more expression). Since the formal dining room is adjacent, it’s just a few steps to the table, where guests have the choice of enjoying two compelling perspectives: Facing the naturalistic landscape of the drought-tolerant plantings by Radford or the modernist glass-and-metal staircase. “The staircase is a very sculptural–and at times kinetic–element that connects the spaces in the house,” says Duff. “You really see the stairs come to life when people are moving up and down them. You get a very pleasant, homey feeling when you see the house in motion, so to speak.”

It’s an easy thing to witness here, given the relaxed flow from one area to another. While natural materials take the edge off this modern floor plan, it’s the movement within the home that gives it true warmth. As the wife puts it, “Living out the story we imagined for our family and our life has been the home’s greatest gift to us.”

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A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views {A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views} – English

A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views {A Modern Desert House Is All About The Views} – English

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So for a sloping site with prevailing views of Mummy and Camelback Mountains, Drewett introduced a clean-lined structure defined by massive horizontal bands that stretch across the arid landscape. A series of vertical stone walls pierces the planes to shield the interiors from the glare that often comes with east/west exposures. Inside, Drewett uses spatial proportions to increase drama. A low-ceilinged entry creates a pause before opening to the great room, where walls of windows reveal the magnitude of the home’s surroundings. “The house is a celebration of vistas out to the desert,” says the architect. The restrained palette of porcelain cladding further allows the views to be the stars. “This look is very clean,” says builder Rich Brock, “but making sure every piece was installed perfectly was a challenge. There was no room for error.”

But the house almost didn’t make it of the drawing board. When the original owner decided not to finish it, Drewett took steps to turn the project into a spec home; it was during the framing stage that the current owners, a Las Vegas couple in search of a second residence, fell for the modern lines and the locale. “The site is elevated but still private, with an excellent view of Camelback,” the husband says. The couple also appreciated getting in early enough to customize the house to their personal preferences. “We quickly assessed the need for floor plan changes, like the addition of a fifth bedroom and bathroom,” says the wife, noting that they also requested an outdoor dining area be enclosed and transformed into an intimate sitting room.

At about the same time, interior designers Tony Sutton and Jordan Huffman came onboard to handle the finishes. “With the strong architectural lines already established, we were going for a natural look glammed up with a little bit of sparkle through lighting, tile and decorative accents,” says Huffman. In the kitchen, for example, where charcoal-stained walnut cabinetry balances the white marble counters, the designers went all out with a statement-making stove hood and chandelier. The former, a sculptural rendition fashioned from bands of brushed and polished stainless steel, brings on the bling, and the glass ball chandelier effervesces like champagne bubbles. “The light fixture has a reflective quality that mimics the stainless and contains all the tones of the rest of the kitchen,” she observes. “It makes the space special.”

Sparkly moments repeat in the master bathroom, where the walnut vanities are topped with quartz infused with shavings of gunmetal, steel and pewter that shimmer like precious metals, and the floor is a combination of natural stone and gleaming mosaic tiles. “As is often the case with jobs of this magnitude, you expect to get the big things right, so it becomes the little things like the twinkle in the countertop or the right lighting choice that matter,” says Sutton. “They create memory points that last.”

Meanwhile the wife, an interior designer, selected the furnishings and amped up the glam in the formal living room with a quartet of chairs wrapped in champagne-colored lustrous fabric and a chandelier made of gold-lined twisted glass rods and fine metal chains. “It resembles a delicate necklace,” she remarks. The more sedate great room is outfitted with a white leather sectional and a silk rug that follow the tones of the porcelain fireplace wall. Because her husband’s favorite color is purple, she went all-out aubergine in the master bedroom with shimmery plum accents, like the wallcovering that offsets the chiseled limestone fireplace.

Back outside, landscape designer Dennis C. Canady tied everything together with grids of agaves and succulents, and lawn panels that complement the linear architecture. Like everything, the landscape is in keeping with the house, which is essentially a formation of vertical and horizontal forms. “You have to be very careful about how you craft modern architecture to create an elegant, cohesive composition,” Drewett says. “Nothing here is embellished for the sake of embellishment. This house is the essence of what a house needs to be.”

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California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family {California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family} – English

California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family {California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family} – English

The post California Cool Style Comes To A Florida Home For An Active Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The look was a slight step outside the boundaries of Miller’s portfolio. But that didn’t mean she couldn’t pull it off. “While this was a bit of a departure creatively from what I normally do, I liked the challenge,” she says. “This was exciting, because no one had ever asked me for a California-modern design.”

The house, by residential designer Dennis Rainho, presents a contemporary coastal-style façade with little ornamentation. “The exterior’s clean lines really set the stage and created a stepping point for the finishing details,” he says. Adding an edgy feel amid the structure’s soft gray shutters are dark bronze window and slider frames. “There are no outriggers or molding,” general contractor Michael Maxwell says, “so the shutters are the only architectural feature.” Inside, the owners wanted “a lot of verticality and lots of light,” Maxwell says, so the team placed floor-to- ceiling windows where possible and 13-foot-high walls in spaces such as the living area. They also introduced Shaker-style millwork on ceilings and walls, adding dimension and interest.

The clients, a couple with four children ages 11 to 17, were relocating from a residence with a lot of unused space and unnecessary upkeep. “We lived in an area nearby, but the house just didn’t suit what we needed as our family was growing up,” the wife says. “The idea here was more of a utilization of space and making every room fully functional.” Keeping usability front of mind, the team added an extra set of machines in the laundry room and created a large mudroom with pantry space, a second refrigerator and floor-to-ceiling lockers— one for each child—designed by Miller. “With four kids, all involved in various sports, they needed a space where they could neatly stow all their sports gear and backpacks,” she explains.

The family-friendly mindset continued in Miller’s choice of hardworking performance fabrics throughout the home, such as flax-colored Crypton on the club room sofa and indoor-outdoor textiles on counter stools and dining chairs. “The owners can literally take them outside and hose them off,” she says.

The designer restrained the palette in the common areas for a cool, California vibe, balancing white walls and clean-lined furnishings with wood accents and select shades of blue. Yet she still made sure to leave her signature mark of inserting bold prints where appropriate. The laundry room’s flooring consists of intricately tiled maritime blues and grays, which complement the mudroom’s blue lockers and cabinets. Each bedroom suite also has its own pop of color or pattern: a blowfish-print wallpaper for the son’s bathroom; blush hues for the younger daughters’ shared bedroom; seafoam and lavender tones for the eldest’s.

But the space that draws the most attention is the back exterior, accessed from the living area’s sliding glass doors. With the move to a smaller home, indoor-outdoor living was essential to the family, and the team delivered with a large covered loggia that houses an outdoor kitchen, a dining table and a gathering area. Overlooking the seventh hole on the golf course, the property also includes a pool, a private outdoor shower and an elevated deck with a fire pit and lounge seating. Landscape architect Steve West designed the grounds, and Miller fulfilled the husband’s single request for a triple-faucet sink—just like the one at his favorite local restaurant—in the cabana bathroom.

The family’s new residence is a hive of activity, the wife says, and that’s just what they envisioned. “I’m at the point in my life where I want to enjoy what I have—and our surroundings and my family,” she says. Most importantly, each beautiful space is lovingly used. “We were very intentional with this house,” Miller says. “Every square foot was well thought-out.”

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Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat {Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat} – English

Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat {Soft Blues And Whites Fill A Serene Florida Retreat} – English

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Designer Kara Hebert, who led the project, spent her childhood in Jupiter riding her bicycle to the beach and taking family boating trips to the Bahamas–idyllic experiences that have “influenced my work and my lifestyle,” she says. Her latest endeavor is no exception: Hebert incorporated variations of soft blue throughout every room, creating a soothing atmosphere in the home by residential designer Dennis Rainho and general contractor Michael Maxwell. To ensure the pervasive primary color is subdued yet engaging, she incorporated shades of white and gray, introduced prints and presented varying hues and textures. The result is a seamless, calming getaway.

The residence’s restful tone is established in the entry courtesy of an abstract ocean watercolor, pale blue lamps and a chandelier made of white shells. From there, the great room takes over as the wide-open heart of the home, encompassing the kitchen, living area and dining area as well as leading to a family room and patio. Comfortable seating includes an approachable white sofa and four light blue chairs, two of which swivel–so during gatherings, occupants can turn toward any conversation. “Strong furniture and art placement in the great room were crucial,” Hebert says. “The space has a high ceiling and an abundance of natural light from windows and glass doors, a signature of Maxwell homes.” Clear handblown glass pendants allow unobstructed views from the living area to the kitchen’s focal shiplap wall, with the family room and patio on the right side and a stunning marble-walled laundry room on the left. “This sight line is my favorite view and probably the most interesting in the house,” the designer says. “It shows a layered effect, which is so important when using a singular color palette.”

To create more visual interest, Hebert selected a subtle patterned fabric for the living area’s swivel chairs and topped the sofa with throw pillows that add pops of blues and grays. For texture, she maintained wood as the main material for various tables, including round washed-mango-wood end tables, a square gray washed-wood coffee table and, in the dining area, a solid wood table surrounded by slate-colored upholstered chairs. “Because you can see into almost every space from the great room, I wanted a visual treat everywhere you looked,” Hebert says. Wooden elements reappear in the family room, where a lattice-back chair and a round drum coffee table retain the coastal vibe. Here, darker gray walls and a powder-blue linen sectional add to the cozy feel for movie nights and lounging. “This is the owners’ favorite room in the house,” Hebert says.

While much of the home gives a nod to the ocean, the master bedroom, where the wife requested a “cloud-like” feel, points toward the sky. Hebert combined a white custom rug, white linen draperies trimmed in seafoam and a comfy bed upholstered in the same powder-blue fabric as a nearby chaise. White linen bedside chests further soften the room, as do the cotton-sateen linens the designer acquired to outfit each bed in the house. The pampering continues in the spa-like master bathroom, where pale sky linen draperies frame a soaking tub. A dramatic wood bead chandelier and walls lined in horizontal shiplap reintroduce the beachy presence.

The restful spaces are more than what they seem: To stand up to the owners’ rescue dogs and visiting family members, Hebert incorporated performance materials throughout the home–notably Crypton fabrics on nearly all the upholstered pieces, including the living area sofa, the family room sectional, the dining chairs and even the master bedroom headboard and chaise. All of the countertops are engineered quartz, known for its durability. And there is not a carpet to be found: Rather, indoor-outdoor area rugs and durable tile that mimics wood provide proper footing for scampering feet. “I wouldn’t want to design a house that will stress someone out,” Hebert says. “I always tell my clients, I want their home to reflect their family and the way they live.”

It’s safe to say Hebert hit her mark: According to the wife, guests say their blood pressure drops in the peaceful environment. “So much of the gratification I get out of my job is making sure clients are comfortable in their home,” the designer says. “To me, that’s the best result.”

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East Coast Tradition Meets West Coast Chill In A Youthful Hamptons Abode {East Coast Tradition Meets West Coast Chill In A Youthful Hamptons Abode} – English

East Coast Tradition Meets West Coast Chill In A Youthful Hamptons Abode {East Coast Tradition Meets West Coast Chill In A Youthful Hamptons Abode} – English

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Beyond pushing him outside of his geographical comfort zone, the project held further creative appeal. Arnold came on right at the beginning of the ground-up project, allowing him to collaborate with Farrell Building Company on the plan and layout, and put his stamp on just about everything. “That was the fun part for me—going from choosing plumbing fixtures and tile down to the dishes,” the designer recalls. One of his highest impact decisions was establishing the home’s overall look. “We wanted Shingle style, but I said, ‘Why don’t we do a black house because you don’t see those all the time?’” he recalls. This approach translates to the exterior feeling of-a-piece with the silhouettes of its more traditional neighbors, but the matte black color sets it apart as a modern riff on the vernacular.

Inside, Arnold’s moody-hued take on Hamptons style is just as enticing. “We kept colors dark and neutral to maintain tonality,” explains the designer. “We wanted strong, but also easy on the eyes.” A sea of faded black, pebble gray and chestnut tones lace through the timber-beamed great room, coming to a crescendo in the adjoining den, which Arnold designed as “a jewel box to be seen from the living space.” There, he employed shadowy velvet drapes, floral wallpaper and painted tongue-and-groove style wainscoting to cozy effect. Equally cocooning is the master bedroom, which manages to feel light and breezy in spite of its black plaster paint walls. “In summer, it’s actually quite nice to retreat to a darker, cooler room,” he muses.

As with all successful design, Arnold took great care in maintaining balance. “I love primitive pieces, and it would have been easy to stay in that lane, but you could end up being too on the nose,” he says. Instead, furnishing choices are a measured mix. For every rustic form, there are contemporary counterweights—a dichotomy on chic display in the dining area, which features a custom dining table made from salvaged timber surrounded by a seating medley of a reclaimed bench paired with vintage Niels O. Møller chairs. “Not everyone loves a bench, but these clients love to cook and their entertaining style is more interactive and casual, so it suits them,” adds Arnold.

So in tune was designer with clients that the couple even enlisted Arnold’s help in curating items for their wedding registry—many of which now sing from the kitchen’s open shelving. Furniture sourcing, too, was collaborative and convivial. Early on, the designer took the couple on a local shopping excursion, yielding a pair of black leather club chairs and an antique rug that now reside in the den. “Those were the first pieces we bought, and they stayed in storage until install,” says Arnold, adding, “The best part of the reveal is when my clients get to see something we bought together in context.”

With his maiden Hamptons design voyage in the books, Arnold has the chance to reflect on his work and likes what he sees. “All of my projects are different, but they share a lineage: how the space feels rather than how it looks,” muses the designer. “This home holds up within the work I do, but it offers a different dialogue and personality. It goes to show that you can achieve both classic and timeless and updated and relevant without being trendy.”

PHOTOS BY TRIA GIOVAN

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A Freshly Renovated Atlanta Cottage Gets Back To Its Roots {A Freshly Renovated Atlanta Cottage Gets Back To Its Roots} – English

A Freshly Renovated Atlanta Cottage Gets Back To Its Roots {A Freshly Renovated Atlanta Cottage Gets Back To Its Roots} – English

The post A Freshly Renovated Atlanta Cottage Gets Back To Its Roots appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Something else Henzlik had in mind was potential buyers—a pair of longtime clients looking to move from the Atlanta home she had previously designed for them into a Buckhead residence that would place them in close proximity to family. Upon viewing the house, the couple was immediately taken with its comfortable size, gracefully arched doorways and walkout backyard shaded by old oaks. “When our two sons heard that we were buying the first house we looked at, they didn’t believe it,” the wife recalls. “But when we saw it, we said, ‘We think this is the one.’”

The couple was equally decisive about beginning a renovation that would encompass architecture, interiors and landscape design—to Henzlik’s delight. “It’s so important to have a good architect to get the bones right and to have the landscaping in place,” she says.

Architect Greg Busch agreed with Henzlik’s assessment that the cottage was beautiful but overdressed. “Almost every room had paneling, and a lot of it didn’t match,” he recalls. “So, the project started with making it feel bigger and cleaner and more tailored by just stripping everything out.” Bulky fireplaces were redesigned with simple, elegant surrounds. Subtly textured wall plaster took the place of heavy millwork. Archways were enlarged and aligned to create seamless sight lines through the house. And the narrow entry’s massive mahogany front door was replaced with a custom, modern iron-and-glass version that floods the space with light.

In the absence of embellishment, “you have nowhere to hide,” Busch says of the home’s new aesthetic—which owes much of its success to builder Lindsey Potts. “A builder who’s paying attention leaves no gaps that need covering with trim; because of his attention to detail, we were able to create a much more tailored interior.”

Outside, the design team streamlined the look by removing brackets and columns, choosing a tonal scheme of warm white paint colors for the brick walls and new shutters and incorporating a tall, modern bay window to frame views of the reimagined front yard.

Before landscape designer Carson McElheney’s intervention, the property had been dominated by a large circular driveway with a concrete parking court. Replacing that hardscaping with a broad fescue lawn and pea-gravel drive made the house appear more established and refined, McElheney says, while new groupings of sculpted boxwoods—along with pachysandra, autumn ferns and large specimen trees—“balance and respect the architecture and tie this property back to the land.” A classic palette of gardenias, hydrangeas, popcorn viburnum, styrax and Southern magnolias “offers wonderful layers of green and white,” he adds, “creating a succession of flowers from early spring through fall.”

A layered approach also drove the interior design: a masculine-meets-feminine mix of traditional furnishings, finishes and fabrics combined with transitional and modern accents. “I like to be intentional about a design not being predictable,” Henzlik says. “I don’t even mind if it takes people a minute to decide if they like it or not. I don’t want their eyes just to move right through and not be caught off guard by something.”

In the study, for example, bold modern art and a sapphire-blue sofa pop against subdued white-oak wall paneling. In the living room, vintage seats by modern design master Paul McCobb mingle with Swedish antique chairs. And in the dining room, a sculptural chandelier and custom furnishings provide a contemporary counterpoint to a traditional coffered ceiling.

The home’s original details shine in other rooms, including the kitchen, which retains its floor-to-ceiling cabinetry and coffered ceiling. Though Henzlik refreshed the space with new lighting, hardware and a marble-topped island, she was judicious with her additions. “I don’t like to clutter a project,” she says, “but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a lot of layers. The clients appreciate attention to every single detail, down to the color of a screw going in a hinge”—and for this home’s new iteration, it’s those subtle touches that make the design.

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For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

Sometimes a fresh start is exactly what’s needed. That was the conclusion of a young Denver couple after years of maintaining an older dwelling in the Washington Park neighborhood left them desiring more ease at home. By sheer coincidence, a new house was being built nearby and the idea of a move that didn’t mean saying goodbye to friends and neighbors was too good to refuse. The couple took the leap and relocated, bringing their longtime designer, Katie Schroder, along for the ride.

The home that caught their eye was designed as a contemporary take on the traditional Craftsman style. Working with architect Kathy Eichelberger Jones, Schroder was able to tailor the under-construction home to the clients with custom finishes and the addition of a playroom between the sons’ bedrooms, but the overriding mandate was to make the space warm and inviting. “The main goal was that this house be livable,” says Schroder. “They wanted a kid- friendly, dog-friendly house that looks beautiful, but where you aren’t afraid to sit down and relax.”

This was not the first interiors rodeo for Schroder and the couple. The husband (a software engineer) and the wife (a social worker) had also hired her to redesign their previous home. “By this time, I knew them very well, so working together was second nature,” says the designer. But that didn’t mean Schroder didn’t have surprises in store. “Katie can envision how best to use a space and, like us, she has two boys and she understands the needs of a family,” says the wife. “But she also knows how to nudge you out of your comfort zone.”

In this case, those style nudges mainly dealt with the color palette. The designer (whose firm’s motto is “color, pattern, culture”) notes that “this couple has a very British sense of color but viewed through a Colorado lens.” With that in mind, Schroder decided that although the house they left behind was done in shades of green, a new blue hue was required. “She practically fired green,” jokes the wife, who is now a blue convert. But this is far from a monochromatic interior. “You can’t have only blue in a house,” says Schroder, who encouraged the couple to consider a lively palette. That design philosophy is on display in the dining room, where a burnished-yellow ceiling floats above a gray wallpaper with a yellow branch pattern, and in the master bedroom done in many shades of purple and green.

But it was the living room rug that ultimately charted the color course, bringing in purple, green and orange to join blue. “I was chicken about some things,” admits the wife. “When I said I thought the rug had too much coral, Katie showed me how it would work. That’s why a designer is important.” For Schroder, it’s those votes of confidence that are key to a successful design. “In fashion, people have been given permission to mix patterns to create a boho look, and I think they’re starting to want that more in their homes now, too,” she says. “These clients trusted me, and that kind of trust is important if you want to create an extraordinary interior.”

The designer says that whimsy also played a role here as well, especially in the light fixtures. Rather than choosing a traditional chandelier for the dining room, for example, she opted for a pair of “cool, spidery lights that add a modern twist.” And in the powder room, she skipped typical sconces for the surprise of a curvaceous brass library light over the vanity. “This is a house where the fun little details add up to something great,” Schroder says.

It turns out the new home was a fit in unexpected ways. “At first we thought the house might be too big, but we use every inch,” says the wife. With everyone working and attending school at home, the husband uses the office, the older son uses the bonus room, the youngest son sits at the dining table and the wife is stationed in the breakfast nook. Even the dogs have their go-to spaces, one claiming the back of the sofa and the other a cozy niche below the stairs. The home’s basement level was intended to do double duty as a play and study area for the kids, but the pandemic has changed everyone’s needs and it now serves handily as an entertainment space for the whole family. “With all of us at home, including the boys and dogs, our home has to be livable. But Katie has also made it special,” says the wife. “We are very happy here.” Proof that change can be for the better.

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A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode {A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode} – English

A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode {A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode} – English

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The apartment is a far cry from the couple’s former multi-story abode, which had old flooring and original handcrafted moldings. But Weitzman, who spent years as a fashion and textile designer before founding her own design firm, knew the right layers would add the requisite character. “There are classical references, but it’s not too traditional,” Weitzman says of the space. “It was the perfect fit for me to put my style into it.”

That style–which celebrates mixing textures–is evident immediately upon entering. In the front foyer, a vintage brass chandelier with black-and-white shades illuminates built-in wooden cabinetry with leather pulls and open shelving atop a sisal rug. “It’s not dressy or uptight,” Weitzman says. “Everything is open-grain, functional and utterly simple.” Patterned wallcovering adds another dimension and creates an interesting backdrop for a black bench and an eclectic collection of artwork.

Another wallcovering, this one a light-gray faux grass cloth, plays a subtler role in the main living areas, where it adds depth and character to the formerly plain white walls. For additional warmth, Weitzman had general contractor Josh Wiener install wooden double barn doors on iron hardware, allowing the more intimate library to be closed off from the formal living and dining areas. “I wanted almost a craftsman or country influence,” she explains.

The built-in oak cabinetry flanking the fireplace in the library is likewise very tailored. Wiener and his team created several mock-ups of different woods and stains, fabricating the final selection at his shop in the Bronx. The builder also implemented Weitzman and consultant Wald Studio’s lighting plan. “Amie chose a lot of interesting fixtures,” says Wiener. “The lighting is very soft and romantic. We reframed ceilings and moved ductwork, which you can’t do in a prewar building. There was a lot of potential in this place.”

In the formal living area, a mix of track lighting and new recessed cans illuminate a low-slung sofa and vintage chairs recovered in charcoal velvet around a bleached oak cocktail table. “Lighting is not just important, it’s everything,” Weitzman says. “Well-lit rooms are rooms you want to be in.” A modern fixture in the adjacent dining area, she notes, creates a soft glow over the long wooden table, which is surrounded by Wishbone chairs and a plush upholstered bench. “It has a living room effect, and that’s what I wanted,” Weitzman says, noting that people will linger there for hours after dinner. A fireplace adds to the romantic ambience. Unimpressed with its original stucco finish, Weitzman covered it with dark Venetian plaster and painted the wall behind it to match. “I needed something dramatic, and it’s a great backdrop for my black-and-white art,” she explains.

The contrasting color scheme carries into the kitchen, where black furnishings, including a pair of drum-shaped aluminum pendants, juxtapose the simple white countertops, backsplash and cabinetry, which has flush-faced doors and no hardware. “There’s nothing to distract the eye,” Weitzman says.

A painter herself, Weitzman has filled the entire apartment with both her own artwork and that of others. In the master suite, a large blue painting by her sister-in-law, Shelley Adler, pops against the room’s pale gray walls, and a smaller work by the designer does the same in the open seating area, which features neutral furnishings and a mix of accent tables. “Tables are little pieces of architecture,” Weitzman observes. “It’s all about the shape and movement.”

The gray hues of the master bedroom carry into a bedroom-turned-office. A sumptuous corner sectional sofa becomes a king-size bed when placed side by side, allowing the space to function well for the couple alone or as a guest suite. David and Weitzman can often be found working at his-and-hers desks, where she enjoys painting. “It’s one of my favorite rooms,” Weitzman says.

And Greenwich Village continues to be one of her favorite neighborhoods. After living uptown for so many years, the couple is overjoyed to live downtown again. There’s an energy about it, Weitzman says, a buzz in the air. The designer especially enjoys seeing young students walking to their classes at her alma mater, Parsons School of Design, just as she did many moons ago. “There’s something circular about it,” she explains. “It’s everything I’ve always wanted, and I couldn’t be happier.”

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A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

The post A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


As a professional couple with young kids were building their family home in the Wash Park, Colorado, neighborhood, they found themselves facing a dilemma: whether to go with sophisticated and polished interiors or keep practicality at the forefront of their plans, since the spaces would have to stand up to their active children. As it turned out, they didn’t have to choose between the two. Their design team promised that they could have both by meeting in the middle, and that’s exactly what they did. “They wanted the house to work for the whole family,” says designer Ashley Larson Eitemiller.

“The homeowners were looking for a large family room for entertaining and for the kids, and a large, wraparound bar that would be open to the kitchen, dining and great rooms,” says residential designer Jim Gunther. Adds Eitemiller, “A lot of activities can happen at once in that open, communal space.”

The home was designed specifically for how the family lives, with various “stowaway spots” they can use as they come and go. “They’re bringing in strollers and all of the attendant kid items,” Gunther says, “so there are multiple areas with organized storage in the home’s front, back and side so they don’t have to carry things all the way through the house, and the open space can stay neat and organized.”

Function meets style with wood elements like corbels, beams and rough-sawn cedar that brings in the casual, Colorado mountain vibe the family loves. “The darker wood beams contrast with the caramel floors, making all the wood really stand out,” Eitemiller says. The couple’s art collection, which includes lots of landscape imagery, also offers a nod to the home’s Colorado aesthetic.

While cool gray color palettes have been wildly popular recently, the homeowners desired more warmth in their home. “They wanted tones that would make the house feel very homey and comfortable, and they were open to jewel colors,” says Eitemiller. “Every space has some element of blue, whether it’s a deep navy, a brighter blue or a beautiful smoky gray-blue. We also brought in some neutral grays, a honey caramel and a nice plum color.”

Layers of texture give the spaces dimension and visual interest. “Throughout, there’s a mix of leather, natural linen and mohair. The carpets are wool, and there are sheers on the windows that allow light in while also offering privacy,” Eitemiller says. “Every room has details designed to visually pull you through the house, such as the wallpaper in the front entry and ceiling beams in the main living spaces.”

Furnishings are stylish yet tough enough for a young family. In the living room, a pair of sofas in camel-colored leather marry beauty and durability, as do refined fiberglass Stone Yard coffee tables. “It looks well put together, but you don’t have to be monitoring everything that’s going on in the house,” says Eitemiller. “We also used Sunbrella outdoor fabric inside, which adds durability.”

One of the primary requirements for this home was to have designated spaces where kids can just take over and play. “Right now, the sun room is used for the kiddos, and it’s a great space right off of the living room and kitchen area,” Eitemiller says. “The children can be playing in that room while their parents are cooking dinner.” There’s also a dedicated playroom upstairs near the bedrooms, and a spacious gymnastics area and playroom downstairs that is designed with no beams or poles to get in the way of the fun.

The family also has a large yard, with plenty of grass for the kids to run around on, as well as exterior entertaining spaces for adults. “The homeowners like to have friends and family over,” says general contractor Patrick Englund. “In the backyard, they have a trellis with heaters above and an exterior fireplace.”

Having come from a home that wasn’t functioning well for them, the family is now enjoying the perfect balance between adult style and kid-friendly design, with fluid spaces for family life and special spots just for playtime. Meanwhile, the home’s interior spaces honor Colorado’s rugged style while giving it modern sensibility.

“We wanted the family to feel comfortable, so they could really live in the house,” says Eitemiller. “They wanted a relaxed, well-designed home that could be used to its fullest without the fear of it being damaged easily. A mountain Colorado feel—but a little bit more refined.”

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After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

The post After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


For many years, while residing in Oklahoma, a Colorado native dreamed of moving his family back to his home state. So, when a work change made it possible to return, it felt like a happy triumph. There was just one catch: The family had grown accustomed to the wide-open spaces of their property in the Sooner State, so their new home on an urban lot in the heart of Denver was an adjustment.

They charged their design team—designer Colin Griffith, landscape designer Joshua Ruppert and builder George Saad—with giving their city house the same kind of connection to the land as their Oklahoma spread. Luckily, the home sits on a corner lot that overlooks Wash Park, so it came endowed with views of Smith Lake, flower gardens and winding trails.

To knit the house even closer to its site, the design team used a similar material palette—including limestone and tongue-and-groove wood panels—on both the interior and the exterior for a seamless effect. “We were creating zones for different activities within the indoor and outdoor spaces,” says Griffith. “Because they are so connected, they needed to feel similar.”

The designer describes that feeling as “livable and relaxed,” which is a departure for these particular homeowners, as their previous home was much more formal. “In their Denver house, the style is sleek and clean,” says Griffith. “We used marble, steel and glass throughout, and this was something new for the clients.”

In order to integrate some of the family’s traditional pieces in the contemporary space, Griffith added new upholstery and patterns. Conversely, he made some of the stark modern architectural elements and finishes more rustic to fit the furnishings. In the sitting room, for instance, the designer used a silk wallcovering to soften the effect of three stone columns that bring an outdoor feeling indoors, while the powder room features a mica wallcovering. For aesthetic balance in the mostly contemporary kitchen, Griffith wire brushed the cabinets for a patinaed effect, wrapped drawers in leather, and installed a bronze range hood over the cooktop.

To open up the home for entertaining, Griffith installed accordion glass doors between the living room and patio. Given that the interior was designed to meld with the back courtyard, when the doors are open the transition between the areas is effortless. “The clients move through the rooms so easily, it’s almost a progressive dinner party within their own home,” Griffith says.

The family inevitably ends up in the living room, their chosen lounging spot. With that in mind, Griffith installed a roomy sectional topped with colorful pillows and shearling throws for what the designer dubs a “Colorado touch.” The room is anchored by a custom designed walnut and oak coffee table with a sculptural bronze base. The table has a special connection to the site, given that some of its wood was sourced from Wash Park by Thomas Harvey, a Denver artisan.

In this house, the outdoor rooms are just as important as the interior spaces. On the rooftop deck, which offers stellar views of the park and mountains, the clients asked for a space that would allow up to 10 people to dine comfortably. Ruppert met the challenge with a dining area and a fire pit, as well as several trees for an “in the treetops” effect.

On the lower-level courtyard and patio, Ruppert used plants to provide beauty as well as privacy. “We layered the spaces with trees, shrubs and flowers in such a way that it feels private but doesn’t totally close out the yard from the rest of the neighborhood,” he explains.

Ruppert and his team used a similar planting strategy outside of the windows to create the feeling of a forest in the city. “We placed a birch tree right in front of the window that faces the stairway,” he says. “It’s lit up at night, so it feels like you’re in a wooded environment.”

Griffith says that, inside or out, the best thing about the new home is that people feel a sense of peace and relaxation in the spaces. “We are all so busy and tethered to technology today, but when you leave your phone and go for a walk in the park, it cleanses your mind, almost like meditation. We really tried to implement that feeling of tranquility in this house.” And, for this family, that feeling is the ultimate homecoming.

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