The South Carolina Lowcountry Retreat Perfect For Artists And Art Lovers {The South Carolina Lowcountry Retreat Perfect For Artists And Art Lovers} – English

The South Carolina Lowcountry Retreat Perfect For Artists And Art Lovers {The South Carolina Lowcountry Retreat Perfect For Artists And Art Lovers} – English

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Full of natural beauty and altered little over time, Kiawah Island is a treasure of the South Carolina Lowcountry. Situated about 25 miles from Charleston, the barrier island has changed hands frequently over the centuries—from a reputed pirate and English colonists to a conservation-minded development company. What persists is an astounding natural habitat for white-tailed deer, bobcats, great blue herons and, yes, beachgoers and golfers.

Kiawah Island’s sense of community and evident natural wonders proved appealing to Atlantans Carey and Doug Benham, who credit the idyllic setting with their decision to build a vacation home there. “We thought the location was just beautiful, among the ocean and the marsh,” explains Carey. “It was such a gorgeous blend of everything.”

Envisioning a modernist, multilevel house that would respect Kiawah Island’s landscape, the Benhams engaged Atlanta-based architect Keith Summerour, with whom they’d worked in the past, to design it. Having established his reputation as a classicist, Summerour has in recent years expanded into contemporary design; what has not changed is his conviction that architecture must be rooted in the land. “Contemporary architecture is the expression of a strong idea, but I do feel strongly that it needs to be of the locale,” says Summerour, whose starting point for the Benhams’ home was a hallmark of the coastal South: the live oak tree.

For the uninitiated, live oaks have undisciplined limb structures, their Spanish moss-draped appendages hovering close to the ground and reaching upward toward the sky. To accommodate the live oaks on the Benhams’ property, Summerour configured the residence as three connecting pods nestled among the trees, laid out to surround one particularly majestic specimen. He managed to negotiate branches by crowning the house with an undulating roofline. The effect is, as Summerour sums up, “as if you took the Swiss Family Robinson tree house and moved it to the ground.”

The neighboring marsh inspired the home’s exterior finishes, as well. “When you look at the marsh, it appears as hundreds of horizontal lines—because of the grass and small tributaries that run throughout it,” notes Summerour, who mimicked this effect with board-formed concrete for the first floor, creating the impression of weathered wooden planks. Mixed with local sand and seashells, the material has the benefit of capturing “the general feel and coloring of the marsh.”

To the second story, Summerour applied two layers of wooden shingles to amplify their shadow lines, once again echoing the marsh’s striated appearance. Instrumental in the process was general contractor Mike Leonard, whose attention to detail ensured the home’s finishes would blend seamlessly with its environment. To contrast the wealth of organic surfaces, Summerour placed massive panes of glass that soar up the façade, wrapping corners and running across walls, affording panoramic views of the landscape.

The grounds surrounding the house reflect the combined efforts of landscape architect John Tarkany and landscape designer Kelly Megeath of Garden Elegance, who likewise took their cues from the marsh, incorporating indigenous grasses and native plants like dwarf palmetto and yaupon holly, along with a few non-native species; Japanese plum yew, for example, was trimmed into neat hedges to complement the home’s clean-lined architecture.

The interiors were just as creatively conceived, but here, both nature and art drove many design decisions. As a visual artist and former board member of Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, Carey and her husband had spent years collecting works by important artists such as Sally Michel Avery, Stephen Pace and Ivon Hitchens, even earmarking specific paintings for each room of their Kiawah Island retreat. Recognizing the deftness required to design it, Carey was quick to call up a friend, Atlanta designer Beth Webb, to help realize her vision. “I knew Beth had the experience, style, taste and personality that would allow me to consult her expertise,” says Carey. “I had a lot of fun buying pieces on my own, but I always came back to Beth for her opinion.”

Webb’s background as an art dealer ensured she was up to the challenge of tailoring the Benhams’ furnishings to their artworks. “Creatively, I like to be stretched, so I love it when someone says, ‘Let’s do something different,’ ” she enthuses. Carey requested that the palette of each room stem from the art as well as the marsh landscape, so Webb pulled hues directly from paintings, sourcing textiles in corresponding shades. Plush selections of upholstery prove that the designer considered comfort just as much as color. “I think contemporary style is cool and chic,” she notes. “But you need to be able to live in it.” To that end, a curated a mix of custom-made and midcentury furnishings keep the effect dynamic.

Ever the editor, Webb shunned any decorative objects that did not hold meaning. “There is little here that does not tell a story,” the designer notes. Truth be told, it’s a statement that could be applied to every aspect of the house and the surrounding property. And as for the homeowners, their story also has a happy ending. “We wake up surrounded by glass walls, looking out onto this huge, incredible, ever-changing marsh,” Carey expresses. “Isn’t that wonderful?”

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A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood {A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood} – English

A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood {A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood} – English

The post A New Social Club, The Britely, Debuts in West Hollywood appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

This December, L.A. welcomes The Britely, a new social club perched high atop the Pendry West Hollywood hotel on Sunset Boulevard. To engage a diverse clientele from different backgrounds and industries, Swedish designer Martin Brudnizki was tapped to come up with a vibrant design that is youthful yet rooted in old Hollywood style. “I hope it will offer members and their guests a feeling of escapism and fantasy,” says Brudnizki. “It’s fun to design a scheme that has surprises,” he adds, noting the gold ceiling and pink ostrich-feather lamps. “These lighthearted touches enhance the ambience, and the result is a place that feels sensual, tactile and seductive.” Club amenities include a music venue, screening room, bowling lanes, three private lounges, a gym and spa, a rooftop pool and two members-only restaurant concepts by none other than iconic chef Wolfgang Puck. thebritely.com

RENDERING COURTESY THE BRITELY

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A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family {A Colorado Home Shines With A Refreshed Rugged Style Fitting For The Whole Family} – English

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As a professional couple with young kids were building their family home in the Wash Park, Colorado, neighborhood, they found themselves facing a dilemma: whether to go with sophisticated and polished interiors or keep practicality at the forefront of their plans, since the spaces would have to stand up to their active children. As it turned out, they didn’t have to choose between the two. Their design team promised that they could have both by meeting in the middle, and that’s exactly what they did. “They wanted the house to work for the whole family,” says designer Ashley Larson Eitemiller.

“The homeowners were looking for a large family room for entertaining and for the kids, and a large, wraparound bar that would be open to the kitchen, dining and great rooms,” says residential designer Jim Gunther. Adds Eitemiller, “A lot of activities can happen at once in that open, communal space.”

The home was designed specifically for how the family lives, with various “stowaway spots” they can use as they come and go. “They’re bringing in strollers and all of the attendant kid items,” Gunther says, “so there are multiple areas with organized storage in the home’s front, back and side so they don’t have to carry things all the way through the house, and the open space can stay neat and organized.”

Function meets style with wood elements like corbels, beams and rough-sawn cedar that brings in the casual, Colorado mountain vibe the family loves. “The darker wood beams contrast with the caramel floors, making all the wood really stand out,” Eitemiller says. The couple’s art collection, which includes lots of landscape imagery, also offers a nod to the home’s Colorado aesthetic.

While cool gray color palettes have been wildly popular recently, the homeowners desired more warmth in their home. “They wanted tones that would make the house feel very homey and comfortable, and they were open to jewel colors,” says Eitemiller. “Every space has some element of blue, whether it’s a deep navy, a brighter blue or a beautiful smoky gray-blue. We also brought in some neutral grays, a honey caramel and a nice plum color.”

Layers of texture give the spaces dimension and visual interest. “Throughout, there’s a mix of leather, natural linen and mohair. The carpets are wool, and there are sheers on the windows that allow light in while also offering privacy,” Eitemiller says. “Every room has details designed to visually pull you through the house, such as the wallpaper in the front entry and ceiling beams in the main living spaces.”

Furnishings are stylish yet tough enough for a young family. In the living room, a pair of sofas in camel-colored leather marry beauty and durability, as do refined fiberglass Stone Yard coffee tables. “It looks well put together, but you don’t have to be monitoring everything that’s going on in the house,” says Eitemiller. “We also used Sunbrella outdoor fabric inside, which adds durability.”

One of the primary requirements for this home was to have designated spaces where kids can just take over and play. “Right now, the sun room is used for the kiddos, and it’s a great space right off of the living room and kitchen area,” Eitemiller says. “The children can be playing in that room while their parents are cooking dinner.” There’s also a dedicated playroom upstairs near the bedrooms, and a spacious gymnastics area and playroom downstairs that is designed with no beams or poles to get in the way of the fun.

The family also has a large yard, with plenty of grass for the kids to run around on, as well as exterior entertaining spaces for adults. “The homeowners like to have friends and family over,” says general contractor Patrick Englund. “In the backyard, they have a trellis with heaters above and an exterior fireplace.”

Having come from a home that wasn’t functioning well for them, the family is now enjoying the perfect balance between adult style and kid-friendly design, with fluid spaces for family life and special spots just for playtime. Meanwhile, the home’s interior spaces honor Colorado’s rugged style while giving it modern sensibility.

“We wanted the family to feel comfortable, so they could really live in the house,” says Eitemiller. “They wanted a relaxed, well-designed home that could be used to its fullest without the fear of it being damaged easily. A mountain Colorado feel—but a little bit more refined.”

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Your Stay At The Brazilian Court Palm Beach Awaits With Fresh Details {Your Stay At The Brazilian Court Palm Beach Awaits With Fresh Details} – English

Your Stay At The Brazilian Court Palm Beach Awaits With Fresh Details {Your Stay At The Brazilian Court Palm Beach Awaits With Fresh Details} – English

The post Your Stay At The Brazilian Court Palm Beach Awaits With Fresh Details appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

PHOTO COURTESY THE BRAZILIAN COURT

Something lovingly old, something whimsically new is the theme behind a collection of redesigned guest rooms at The Brazilian Court in Palm Beach.

While they still embrace traditional dark wood floors and crown molding, Lauren Hastings of LSI Designs installed lush green velvet headboards and sofas, and added splashes of lavender. The standout feature: dreamy wisteria-upholstered wall panels. “In early design development we were pulling color inspirations that are strong enough to carry the weight of the room but that are also tranquil and contemporary,” explains Hastings. “Wisteria, with its varying tones of lavenders, blues, greens and yellows, was a perfect fit.”

Artist Austin Kerr created the artwork, and Frameworks printed the image on silk-like fabric. Renovations will continue, with special touches like custom art using Pierre Frey patterns and one-of-a-kind pieces from Keller Palm Beach.

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Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns {Bring On The Storybook Charm: A Historic Denver Tudor Embraces Playful Patterns} – English

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In 1928, architect Burnham Hoyt—a Denver native—designed a storybook brick Tudor in what is now a historic neighborhood in his hometown. One of five notable architects contributing to Denver’s City Beautiful movement of that era, Hoyt incorporated Jacobean, English Norman and French Provincial elements into the home’s design. Nearly a century later, a modern-day couple with three kids fell in love with the home’s history, style and location—but not its 1970s addition.

That expansion had left the home with some troublesome quirks the new occupants wanted to address. “The family room didn’t relate to the house and backyard, and there were many unnecessary little rooms,” says architect Steve Ekman, who worked with designer Peggy Robbins Bender and general contractor Doug Canady to restore and renovate the residence. “The new owners wanted to make this home their urban oasis.” They also wanted to preserve its historic details, which thrilled Ekman, a former trustee for Historic Denver. His team dug up the original architectural plans and photos at the Denver Public Library. “I have a historian on staff and he loves to do research,” Ekman says. “It’s sort of like archaeology for a house.”

General contractor Doug Canady restored the home’s exterior—and many interior elements—to its former glory. “There was so much work to be done—we cleaned the stone and the brick to bring out the old details,” says Ekman. “Doug did a great job of making the exterior sing.” Inside, the original living room, dining room and hallways were preserved but the additions at the rear of the house were removed to start fresh with more spacious, functional rooms.

Ekman’s team worked with Bender—one of their many collaborations—to create livable spaces that would accommodate contemporary furnishings. When styling the interiors, Bender let the home’s finishes lead the way. “The beautiful thing about a Tudor is the texture,” she says. “The palette is about rough-hewn timbers, stone and wood. There is a lot of warmth in the wood, and blue is a nice foil—so we pulled a lot of blues in with fabrics.”

Bender also incorporated playful patterns and splashes of color. In the entryway—where classic timbers, plaster and brickwork abound—she placed an elegant armchair upholstered with a head-turning fuchsia print. A few coats of soft gray paint freshened up the dark and dated wood-paneled dining room while at the same time helping to create a visual transition between the original part of the house and the new addition. “We found this great antique Jacobean-style sideboard that really adds detail to the room,” Bender says. In the living room, the timbers remain as they were, giving the room a cozy feel. With three kids and the family’s St. Bernard, Rufus, running around, the room offers an “away” space for the couple, with a drawing room feel. “It has the only original wood-burning fireplace,” Bender says.

The new great room is the family gathering spot. At one end, a Marvin accordion door folds back to link the space to the yard. Bender says the challenge with historic renovations is thoughtfully updating a home to make it functional. “A folding door—such a modern notion—seems like an unlikely fit for a Tudor great room, but it works,” she says. That door plus a host of new windows lend the formerly inward-facing home a strong connection to the outdoors. “The landscape is a huge part of this project,” Bender says. “You can’t have everything opening out without having something fabulous to open up to.”

Landscape designer Paul Wrona delivered by creating a lush, soothing garden. “We planted roses as the foreground for ornamental grasses,” he says. “We wanted wisteria to grow up the pergola and used a lot of grasses and a mix of perennial colors so there’s something blooming at all times.” Wrona also custom designed a swimming pool, as well as an outdoor dining area and a lounging spot. A 12-foot privacy wall was added to screen a new office building behind the property, and gently bubbling water features mask any traffic noise while also being lovely to look at.

The once labyrinthian home now suits the needs of the family while maintaining its old-world Tudor elegance. Ekman says: “The homeowner tells us that it functions so well, they are entertaining a lot more—they even had the husband’s company Christmas party here. It’s opened up their world.”

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Tour A Cheerful Palm Beach Home With Patterns That Pop {Tour A Cheerful Palm Beach Home With Patterns That Pop} – English

Tour A Cheerful Palm Beach Home With Patterns That Pop {Tour A Cheerful Palm Beach Home With Patterns That Pop} – English

The post Tour A Cheerful Palm Beach Home With Patterns That Pop appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Owning a primary residence in Boston, the clients wanted an uncomplicated retreat where their friends, adult children and grandchildren could gather. The single-level abode by Dailey Janssen Architects in the north end of Palm Beach had been the first property they toured when house hunting. They found themselves instantly attracted to its bright spaces and open floor plan, which conjured a carefree air of being on perpetual holiday. “What I love about the house is the sort of casual-living, Malibu vibe,” the wife says. “You walk in the front door, and the first thing you see is the outside and the pool. It instantly feels relaxing.” The Turkish stone flooring contributes to the mood, as do the soaring beamed ceilings and simple white and gray kitchen.

While the layout of the newly constructed dwelling appealed to the owners, the interior paint colors and light fixtures did not. Skok updated both and then set about curating a diverse selection of artwork, fabrics and rugs, incorporating not just her own creations but also those of her industry friends, to produce a layered, lived-in look. “There’s so much talent out there, and I love back-and- forth collaboration and integrating other designers’ work into my projects,” she says. “Personally, I think it’s boring to only use your own fabrics.”

Born and raised in South Africa, Skok lived in London for several years and brings an international sensibility to her projects through her use of eclectic fabrics and daring combination of bold patterns and rich textures. Elements of a Skok design are easy to identify, as in this residence: In the foyer is a settee she upholstered in a graphic Zulu-inspired material. Opposite is a dramatic braided ra a mirror, and on a nearby wall are painted ceramic plates by an emerging South African artist she discovered.

Just past the foyer are the living and dining areas, where Skok kept the furnishings neutral to employ her trademark mix. Pillows in graphic red and blue prints top the cream-colored sofa. Striking abstract art enlivens the dining area. And a trio of South African basket lids decorate a hallway leading to the master bedroom, where a tufted yellow bed and tropical window treatments add a youthful note. Down the hall, an explosion of unexpected patterns of Skok’s own design infuses the wife’s office with whimsy.

Throughout the home, the designer emphasized an informal Palm Beach vibe by sourcing accessories from Antique Row shops and other local vintage stores. A framed Japanese print discovered nearby hangs in the guest bedroom, and perched on the living area’s replace mantel is a growing flock of porcelain parrots–cheeky findings Skok calls her “wink to Palm Beach.”

Yet the essence of the locale is best captured in the home’s outdoor gathering spots. The U-shaped structure wraps around the pool, yielding a private backyard as well as an extra-deep loggia. That space–a key attraction for the couple, as the wife loves spending time outside–allowed Skok to form an exterior dining spot and a living area, outfitted with a large sectional. Continuing the strategy from inside, she kept the furnishings white and introduced color through pillows clad in wildly printed fabrics.

Despite the home’s lived-in feel, Skok completed the job swiftly and effortlessly by heeding her own design advice: “‘Enjoy yourself’ is what I tell clients. There is a lot of serendipity in each project, and sometimes you just have to follow that instead of the rules. Decorate, and then get on with your life.”

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After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family {After Living In Oklahoma, A Connection To The Outdoors Is A Must For A Denver Family} – English

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For many years, while residing in Oklahoma, a Colorado native dreamed of moving his family back to his home state. So, when a work change made it possible to return, it felt like a happy triumph. There was just one catch: The family had grown accustomed to the wide-open spaces of their property in the Sooner State, so their new home on an urban lot in the heart of Denver was an adjustment.

They charged their design team—designer Colin Griffith, landscape designer Joshua Ruppert and builder George Saad—with giving their city house the same kind of connection to the land as their Oklahoma spread. Luckily, the home sits on a corner lot that overlooks Wash Park, so it came endowed with views of Smith Lake, flower gardens and winding trails.

To knit the house even closer to its site, the design team used a similar material palette—including limestone and tongue-and-groove wood panels—on both the interior and the exterior for a seamless effect. “We were creating zones for different activities within the indoor and outdoor spaces,” says Griffith. “Because they are so connected, they needed to feel similar.”

The designer describes that feeling as “livable and relaxed,” which is a departure for these particular homeowners, as their previous home was much more formal. “In their Denver house, the style is sleek and clean,” says Griffith. “We used marble, steel and glass throughout, and this was something new for the clients.”

In order to integrate some of the family’s traditional pieces in the contemporary space, Griffith added new upholstery and patterns. Conversely, he made some of the stark modern architectural elements and finishes more rustic to fit the furnishings. In the sitting room, for instance, the designer used a silk wallcovering to soften the effect of three stone columns that bring an outdoor feeling indoors, while the powder room features a mica wallcovering. For aesthetic balance in the mostly contemporary kitchen, Griffith wire brushed the cabinets for a patinaed effect, wrapped drawers in leather, and installed a bronze range hood over the cooktop.

To open up the home for entertaining, Griffith installed accordion glass doors between the living room and patio. Given that the interior was designed to meld with the back courtyard, when the doors are open the transition between the areas is effortless. “The clients move through the rooms so easily, it’s almost a progressive dinner party within their own home,” Griffith says.

The family inevitably ends up in the living room, their chosen lounging spot. With that in mind, Griffith installed a roomy sectional topped with colorful pillows and shearling throws for what the designer dubs a “Colorado touch.” The room is anchored by a custom designed walnut and oak coffee table with a sculptural bronze base. The table has a special connection to the site, given that some of its wood was sourced from Wash Park by Thomas Harvey, a Denver artisan.

In this house, the outdoor rooms are just as important as the interior spaces. On the rooftop deck, which offers stellar views of the park and mountains, the clients asked for a space that would allow up to 10 people to dine comfortably. Ruppert met the challenge with a dining area and a fire pit, as well as several trees for an “in the treetops” effect.

On the lower-level courtyard and patio, Ruppert used plants to provide beauty as well as privacy. “We layered the spaces with trees, shrubs and flowers in such a way that it feels private but doesn’t totally close out the yard from the rest of the neighborhood,” he explains.

Ruppert and his team used a similar planting strategy outside of the windows to create the feeling of a forest in the city. “We placed a birch tree right in front of the window that faces the stairway,” he says. “It’s lit up at night, so it feels like you’re in a wooded environment.”

Griffith says that, inside or out, the best thing about the new home is that people feel a sense of peace and relaxation in the spaces. “We are all so busy and tethered to technology today, but when you leave your phone and go for a walk in the park, it cleanses your mind, almost like meditation. We really tried to implement that feeling of tranquility in this house.” And, for this family, that feeling is the ultimate homecoming.

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Filled With Stylish Interiors, This Design Tome Is A Visual Treat {Filled With Stylish Interiors, This Design Tome Is A Visual Treat} – English

Filled With Stylish Interiors, This Design Tome Is A Visual Treat {Filled With Stylish Interiors, This Design Tome Is A Visual Treat} – English

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Those with a penchant for beautiful design can always appreciate a gorgeous new coffee table book. If that’s you, you’ll want to crack open the newly released James Huniford At Home.

Over the course of eight chapters brimming with 200 images, the prolific Huniford—commonly referred to as “Ford”—shares his approach to designing everything from dining rooms and libraries to kitchens and bedrooms in homes across New York, Connecticut, Martha’s Vineyard, Nashville and Marin County, California.

But this monograph is far from all dessert and no entrée. Along with its aesthetic allure, you’ll get to follow Huniford’s thought process as he takes on each project, starting with how he considers scale and proportion, moving through the selection of art and color, and offering insight into his mastery of juxtaposing contemporary and traditional, rustic and refined, all while ensuring each home remains true to the personalities of its occupants. Also showcased are Huniford’s own Tribeca loft and his historic Bridgehampton home, both of which he has referred to as “laboratories” for his ideas.

sitting area with leather armchairs and artwork

PHOTOS COURTESY MONACELLI PRESS

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Trading Beachside Iconography For Japanese-Informed Chic In Key Largo {Trading Beachside Iconography For Japanese-Informed Chic In Key Largo} – English

Trading Beachside Iconography For Japanese-Informed Chic In Key Largo {Trading Beachside Iconography For Japanese-Informed Chic In Key Largo} – English

The post Trading Beachside Iconography For Japanese-Informed Chic In Key Largo appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


When interior designer Phyllis Taylor and architect Maria Rignack found themselves renovating a Key Largo condo with sharp angles and a challenging floor plan, the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi seemed an apt envelope for the Florida project. Derived from Buddhist teachings, the school of thought embraces imperfections and celebrates nature—tenets that have shaped interiors and architecture alike.

Taylor and Rignack’s clients, a prominent Midwestern family, had previously worked with their firm on a Palm Beach-style vacation home in the same resort community. But as the years went on, the family found they needed more space to accommodate an ever-expanding brood. With no acreage to build a guest cottage, the couple jumped at the opportunity to purchase in a new development just a quick golf cart ride away, enlisting the duo to smarten the existing architectural interiors and devise a tasteful, low-maintenance design scheme.

Bringing in natural light was the first priority. The unit was inwardly situated, plunging the entry and hallway into darkness. “Florida sun is our greatest natural resource,” Taylor says. “The quality of that light and how it reacts to color and gives us shadowing is what we count on to make our interiors successful.” So, as a first order of business, frosted-glass doors were added to the bedrooms off the entryway, filtering in soft outdoor light while still maintaining privacy.

Next, organic materials were employed to camouflage the hallway’s door procession. “Essentially we were given white walls, many utilitarian doors and an odd point,” Rignack explains of the corridor. “We decided the best way to address this was to conceal the doors as much as possible.” General contractor James Gregory and builder Miles Zamora clad the hall in a grainy milpa wood on one side and full-height white marble reliefs on the other. “The selections and applications of colors helped,” Gregory says. “They’re all the primarily neutral, natural tones. The natural light now bounces throughout the condo, and it’s very soft and comforting.” In tandem, the surfaces bring impactful texture to the space, which the team highlighted further with sleek sconces that simultaneously call attention to door openings. At the end of the hall, where the walls converge in that aforementioned point, Rignack carved in as much as the abutting plumbing would allow her, transforming the corner into a chic gallery niche-cum-focal feature.

The unit’s bones proved challenging for the clients as well, having long-favored classic interiors. “We couldn’t throw a traditional style into a modern layout—the space just didn’t lend itself to that,” Taylor explains. “The difficult thing was convincing the owners their sensibilities would still shine through—that the design would be an updated interpretation of what’s important to them and how they like to live.” Entrusting their fruitful long-term relationship, the couple took a leap and embraced Taylor’s contemporary “Zen with zing” vision.

To incorporate the wife’s favorite color—“blue, blue and more blue,” the interior designer describes—antique indigo textiles from Japan were introduced as a jumping-off point. Throughout each room, indigo fragments are sewn into throw pillows, framed as wall art and gracefully draped across furnishings, establishing a color narrative that carries across the hallway rug and powder bath detailing. Japanese references continue with details like the glass and rope pendants in the kitchen, inspired by the culture’s rope and knot art, and in the use of woven textures throughout, such as a living area armchair that nods to traditional basket weaving. Beyond these nuances, a reverence for fine craftsmanship and earthy forms permeates the space, from the intricate built-ins in the master bedroom to the bespoke surface of the indoor dining table: a slab of bleached wood Taylor had cast in white acrylic.

Bringing the wabi-sabi ethos full circle, the outdoor living space is undoubtedly the unit’s most enjoyed feature. Accessible via a wall of retractable glass doors, the expansive terrace flows into the airy interiors, blurring the lines between inside and outside. “The owners enjoy the Florida air and live more in that outside room than in the conventional interior spaces,” Taylor says.

In a happy surprise to both client and design team, the new apartment has drawn unexpected visitors to the family’s beloved vacation destination: the owners themselves. “They thought that this was going to be a house for guests,” Taylor says. “But as it turns out, they’re the guests.”

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Two Marquee Names In Interior Design Come Together In Miami For An Anniversary Celebration {Two Marquee Names In Interior Design Come Together In Miami For An Anniversary Celebration} – English

Two Marquee Names In Interior Design Come Together In Miami For An Anniversary Celebration {Two Marquee Names In Interior Design Come Together In Miami For An Anniversary Celebration} – English

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Who runs the world? These days, it feels like Miami. That’s where Rita Chraibi, the French-Moroccan designer who founded International Designers in Casablanca, has opened her second global headquarters. Even bigger news: She’s partnering with Roche Bobois as the exclusive interior designer for the brand’s 60th anniversary. Chraibi will oversee several design projects in Miami, including a $30 million residence in Miami Beach. “My collaborations with Roche Bobois represent the firm’s haute couture designers, who craft tailor-made home pieces,” says Chraibi. “I balance comfort with the signature styles of world-renowned fashion designers Christian Lacroix, Jean-Paul Gaultier and Kenzo, and fabric brands such as Lelièvre Paris and Missoni Home. This is a new concept that harmonizes fashion design with interior design.” intdesigners.com

PHOTO COURTESY INTERNATIONAL DESIGNERS

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