A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“The clients wanted an exciting plan for a clean, contemporary dwelling with glass walls that open to the outdoors,” notes Morton. Situated on the north side of the valley, it made sense to extend the house wide, like outstretched wings, to take in southerly views and sunshine. The resulting shape “felt like it wanted to take flight,” says the architect, who nicknamed the house “Soaring Eagle.” “The home’s forms mimic a large wingspan and a tail section, and the raised center intersection can be viewed as the head,” he explains. “The perspective and views afforded by the site feel like soaring above the ground below.” Without knowing it, he tapped into a spirit already captured in the couple’s art collection. Serendipitously, hanging in their Arizona home was a large Rebecca Kinkead painting of a soaring bald eagle. “Needless to say, it’s been relocated to Telluride,” adds Morton.

“The house has low-slung, horizontal lines—it’s bold in its simplicity,” the architect continues. “I tend to pare down ornamentation and create something more poetic and understated.” Morton is also driven by “a responsibility to respect nature,” and wrapped the home in silvery-hued stone and cedar siding. Adding integrated planters around the structure offered additional thermal benefits, and tufted-grass plantings visually nestle the dwelling into the land. “It treads lightly, and it has a quiet strength,” he says. Because the clients wanted “an edited style,” Morton worked closely with Taylor to select exterior materials that could continue inside for a cohesive feel. “The result is a soft, warm materiality,” he notes.

“These clients didn’t want to be limited by anything cliché,” says Taylor, who divides her practice between Manhattan and Telluride. “You see a lot of the same things in the mountain decorating world, so we wanted something fresh.” For an element of fun, she found a living room coffee table composed of a glass top that rests on cedar “boulders,” some of which are movable. “It brings a bit of wit to the space,” she says. Organic forms also inspired the table Taylor created for the dining room. “It’s sculptural and breaks up the rectilinear forms of that main living area,” the designer explains.

More uncommon pieces were discovered during marathon shopping trips in Manhattan. “They’d come to New York, and I’d take them out from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. We spent many days like that, and it was such fun,” says Taylor. As a result, the home contains pieces from Liaigre and Apparatus mixed with unique finds from local shops. All these pieces exist against a varied palette. “There are probably 15 different colors present—shades of blue, gray, stone, cream, parchment, camel, brown, taupe and a little maroon,” notes the designer. “This complexity is what makes it successful, along with a lot of textural layering.”

To fulfill the couple’s wish list, Taylor and Morton created two primary suites flanking the public areas (one for the clients and one for his daughter) and additional guest rooms downstairs. They also designed an art studio and a woodshop, as well as a library loft. But it’s the kitchen that anchors the house. “It had to work,” stresses Taylor. “They love to cook, bake and entertain, so we took a long time perfecting the space’s functionality.” An exposed stone wall not only creates continuity with the exterior, but also imbues the space with a sense of age—the kind the designer says you find in old Italian dwellings.

“Everything adds up to their overall quality of life here,” Taylor observes. And when the glass doors open to the fresh air and sunshine—even in winter—the house truly does seem to soar.

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Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room {Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room} – English

Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room {Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room} – English

The post Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In Paso Robles wine country, amidst the hills and vines of Booker Vineyard’s 100-acre property, is a new tasting venue with a lounge-y vibe that invites guests to gather with friends, settle in and make themselves at home.

Signum Architecture’s minimalist design honors the California winery’s natural surroundings, matching the sensibilities of owner and vintner Eric Jensen, whose respect for the land is central to his winemaking approach. The fracture patterns of the area’s limestone soil, for example, were used as the basis for the layout of the structure’s long walls. The restrained material palette includes cedar, board-formed concrete and natural steel, which architect Juancarlos Fernandez says “will rust over time, just like the stakes at the end of each vine row.”

The architecture is complemented by understated interiors by Katie Martinez Design, whose warm, light color palette was also inspired by the limestone soil. Tactile surfaces abound— from raked limestone bathroom tile and bleached walnut and white oak cabinetry to cedar siding and beams and burnished brass at the bar front.

The new spaces set the stage for various experiences at the winery, from a VIP limestone cave tasting with the owner’s personal library of wines, to an afternoon of “Bocce and Bottles” on a private outdoor lounge area.

PHOTO COURTESY ADAM ROUSE PHOTOGRAPHY

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Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

The post Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Originally built in 1977, the mountain abode was renovated in 2019 by the previous owner into its sleek statement of glass and sunlight, made in consultation with architect Scot Broughton. In their work, McGuire and Tenzin especially delight in making such grand contemporary structures feel welcoming and human-centric. “People seem to be drawn to us to create cozy interiors in these types of spaces,” notes McGuire. “We balance the architecture and complement it, so it doesn’t feel cold and stark.”

The home already provided an inspiring canvas for the designers to explore, and they found able partners in general contractors Thaddeus Eshelman and Jimmy Terui, who also oversaw the 2019 renovation. Collaborating on the new customizations with McGuire and Tenzin “was the bow on the present,” notes Terui. “All of their final touches really put it over the top.” Together, they focused on incorporating new finishes that would add more visual weight to the interior’s broad white walls and pale oak flooring. The abode featured black metal-framed windows and ceiling box beams that cut through the light and airy spaces, and the designers emphasized this juxtaposition by adding a few bolder finishes, such as staining the kitchen cabinetry in a deep ebony hue. The rich color “gives some structure and energy to the space, so it’s not just neutrals,” Tenzin explains.

To temper the angularity of the architecture, the designers introduced some curved elements to the interiors. “Right now, we have this desire for softer lines, yet still done in a very contemporary way,” says Tenzin. This was the guiding principle behind selecting the new furnishings and accents: all are unequivocally modern in silhouette, but never too sharp or sleek. Chairs and sofas have rounded backs and arms softened with tactile materials like shearling, wool and saddle leather. Mixing abstract designs with traditional Moroccan weaves, “the rugs are also really special, as they add a lot of comfort and interest,” says McGuire. The couple’s bedroom in particular is a study in tactile layering, with an upholstered bed frame, a fabric-paneled wall and artful Apparatus sconces featuring wefts of horsehair. “Textures were a key part of adding in that warmth to the home,” notes Tenzin about their overall approach.

The designers also kept everything within an organic palette borrowed from the surrounding mountain woodland to create cohesion. “Golden tones from the aspens, amber tones from the scrub oaks and greens from the evergreens all filter in through the house,” notes Tenzin. And in the couple’s serene main bedroom “there’s a little bit of a lavender hue that relates to the lavender and sage that grow so beautifully here in Colorado.” Artwork introduces more personal and playful notes of color, like the specially commissioned comic book-inspired piece by artist Nelson De La Nuez, which serves as a touching reference to the couple’s love story.

A self-confessed lighting fanatic, Tenzin was particularly passionate about how they would illuminate the home. Style wise, materials ranged from minimalist black metal to delicate amber glass globes. But “it was also really important for us to find LED fixtures that get warm as you dim them,” he explains. “It’s so critical for creating the right vibe.” These technical details are very much like “the difference between gray, cool lighting, which makes everybody look like a ghost, and that beautiful candlelit feel where everyone looks glamorous,” adds McGuire.

Nestled in this soft glow and laden with lush textures, the dwelling now feels more approachable. And for the designers, there’s nothing better than infusing soulfulness into such shiny, modern spaces. As McGuire says, “When you can walk in and see the family truly relaxing in their own home, that’s a feeling of success for us.”

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Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves {Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves} – English

Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves {Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves} – English

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As any desert dweller knows, the landscape’s saturated sunsets and botanical austerity create an ideal backdrop for a variety of architectural styles. In Santa Fe, architects have responded with designs that are rooted in tradition yet also forward thinking in execution. The result is an architectural authenticity captured in Santa Fe Modern: Contemporary Design in the High Desert. Authored by Helen Thompson with photographs by Casey Dunn, the book features 20 distinctive residences that highlight Santa Fe’s emerging modernist design. “Santa Fe Modern comes out at a time when it has never been more urgent to think about how we are at home in the world,” Thompson says. “Modern houses in Santa Fe seem as if they belong in the dramatic desert landscape, and that sense of belonging is the real reason modernism works so well there.”

PHOTO COURTESY MONACELLI

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Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past {Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past} – English

Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past {Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past} – English

The post Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Over the next decades, the estate was divvied up into smaller parcels and sold, but the main residence remained, almost just as it was built, until its current owners set foot on the property. “It was on and off the market multiple times, and for about four years, we made offers on it,” the wife recalls. “My biggest concern was that someone would buy it and just tear it down.” But the couple prevailed and undertook the work of restoring the house to its former aesthetic glory while updating it for life in the 21st century.

Interior designer Renée Gaddis led the effort—and she had a lot of beautiful elements to work with: original windows and heart-of-pine floors, detailed molding and millwork, Shaker-style doors with brass hardware, and push-button electrical switches with pearl inlays. From the beginning, Gaddis knew how her plans would play out. “I think a lot of people couldn’t see through the home’s age and wear; it might have looked daunting and overwhelming,” she says. “But the house itself inspired me. It led me to the design very easily, and I saw clearly what we had to do, which was take the house back to its original grandeur.”

Gaddis began by preserving the structure’s layout, with help from general contractor Joe Gatewood. “The home was an absolute time capsule when we first saw it,” he recalls. They removed a living area fireplace that blocked views of the water from the main entrance; its second- story counterpart came out, too, leaving additional space for the main bathroom (and even with these changes, the house still retains six original fireplaces). Gaddis had the floors refinished and integrated the century-old molding into new baseboards. Rusted-out door hardware was replaced with replicas—“The mechanisms were so bad, we kept getting locked in rooms,” the designer says. And the old windows and exterior doors— which, Gatewood points out, endured a century of storms—had to go too in favor of hurricane- code-compliant versions.

In this updated shell, Gaddis layered in luxurious fixtures and finishes, sumptuously upholstered furnishings and beautifully crafted art pieces. In the living area, she staged “a perfect combination of modern interiors in a historic home,” the wife says. There, glam chandeliers pair with a sleek white marble coffee table and clean-lined sofas. The family room, too, sets a rich tone with detailed wall paneling and built- ins painted gray and two plush velvet sectionals. Striking contemporary fixtures make statements throughout the residence, overseeing more classical furnishings in a fabulous presentation of old meets new.

As the design came together, the house had some secrets to reveal. The team found an old potbelly stove Gaddis transformed into a wood-burning pizza oven, a decision that led her to reimagine the kitchen as a 1920s French bistro with open glass shelves and brass fixtures. More demo uncovered a safe hidden in a wall in the owners’ bedroom. Sadly, it didn’t contain any Carnegie cash.

But the home does contain more than a modicum of priceless history, which is now preserved for a long time to come. “We all felt like this was the project of a lifetime,” Gatewood says. The new owners agree. “This isn’t just a home for our family,” the wife says. “It’s a piece of Fort Myers history that will outlast us all.”

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Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House {Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House} – English

Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House {Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House} – English

The post Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


But take a boat trip along the edges of Lake Mendota and you’ll spot just that. The pared-back residence, distinguished by its mostly limestone-and-glass façade, evokes the essence of California cool—thanks to its architects, Ron Radziner and Leo Marmol, as well as the rest of their team—Stephanie Hobbs, Matt Jackson and Troy Newell.

The homeowners’ previous dwelling, located just down the road, leaned much more traditional. But for their new lakeside abode, on a unique site that sloped gently down to the water, they wanted something special. “We were interested in very simple forms, sort of hovering above this amazing setting,” says Radziner, who worked with landscape architect Lindsay Buck to ensure the environment was cohesive with the structure. “Something where you would come into the home and move through these sculptural forms and then take in beautiful vistas to the lake. We saw the landscape as an opportunity to really create this sort of native prairie with wildflowers and grasses, then slowly work our way down to the house where it would become more open and architectural.”

The streamlined rectilinear design of the residence—built by general contractor Joe Sagona and project manager Aaron Combs—creates a minimalist vibe, as does the restrained palette of limestone and stained-gray oak. But a two-story white circular staircase set against a glass backdrop provides a dramatic visual counter to the straight lines. It’s an unexpected but welcome architectural touch that sets the tone for the interiors created by designers Aimee Wertepny and Jennifer Kranitz. The task, the pair explains, was to create spaces that merge the home’s minimalism with the wife’s taste for polish and sophistication. “There’s a tension between glamorous and organic,” Wertepny says. “The wife really resonates with things that are a bit shiny, reflective and pretty.”

Working with the natural tones of the dwelling’s contextual shell, the designers opted for furnishings in black and white and higher-contrast decor, including a polished hood and full-height hardware on the refrigerators in the kitchen. “There are a lot of moments of reflective elements that felt a bit more glamorous for the wife,” Kranitz says. “We wanted both of these points of view to be really married and feel super seamless and intentional.” Since the soaring windows brought hues of nature into the home, the designers chose not to introduce more color. “We have a lot of green and blue, so there’s a really colorful backdrop,” Kranitz notes. “It made sense to let it be a little easier on the eyes so that we could let some of those other elements shine.”

Mixing finishes—antique brass, polished nickel, and matte black and bronze—throughout the space helped add textural intrigue, as did using materials in unique ways. In the dining room, the custom 17-foot table features Lucite-and-steel legs and the surrounding sculptural dining chairs are embellished with zippers. Upstairs in the main bedroom, an alpaca rug adorns the wall behind the bed, serving as a headboard of sorts. “We’re known for that element of surprise—and we’re always looking for opportunities to put a rug on a wall!” Wertepny laughs. “Could we have had an upholstered king-sized headboard there? Sure, but this is so much more dramatic and customized and really spoke to what the client was looking for—very soft, feminine and glamorous without having a specific sparkle to it.”

To add further coziness to the home, the designers introduced custom millwork and built-ins throughout. Most notable is the display behind the bar for the owners’ extensive tequila collection that also incorporates a series of protruding beams with crystalline pendant lights. “We inherited beautiful bones and a gorgeous set of floor plans,” says Wertepny. “But that was our moment to interject with detailing—something that was very simple and quiet and adds a little nod to the bling.”

The chance to turn tradition on its head made the project all the more fun for the designers. “When people think of a lake house it’s typically not this really sharp, tasteful modern glass box,” Kranitz says. “I’m just always struck by how cool it was that we were able to do this modern spin on a lake home—it feels so good.”

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Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

The post Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

The recent debut of Altus Vail, a luxurious 15-residence property adjacent to Vail Village, was a major milestone for the mountain enclave, which hasn’t seen a significant new development in 10 years. And it couldn’t have come at a better time: In 2020, just as demand for residential real estate in the valley soared, inventory dropped to historic lows. Altus’ offerings look and live like single-family homes with an intimate setting and private 8-foot-deep balconies accessed via retractable sliding doors that facilitate indoor-outdoor living—and dramatic mountain and ski-run views.

Designed by Denver-based architecture firm 359 Design with interiors by OCG’s Kellye O’Kelly, the mountain-contemporary dwellings also offer finishes not often seen in multifamily developments, from quartz-clad kitchens with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances to stone fireplaces inlaid with sleek metal accents. But it’s the rare single-family home that offers this kind of access—the Golden Peak and Vail Village base areas are both just a short walk away.

PHOTO COURTESY ALTUS VAIL

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The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun {The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun} – English

The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun {The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun} – English

The post The Montana Lake House That Celebrates Nature With A Bit Of Fun appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The clients emphasized the importance of respecting the surrounding environment. To speak to the local vernacular, Dunham recommended residential designer Larry Pearson. He was familiar with Pearson’s work and confident that he could create the contemporary but relaxed vibe the couple was looking for yet stay true to the setting. “We love regional materials,” notes Pearson, who worked with general contractor Kelcey Bingham to incorporate recycled timber and Montana moss rock. “The exterior color scheme and materials blend into the setting,” adds Bingham. A sense of place was top of mind for landscape architect Kurt Vomfell as well. “The goal was to reflect the character of Montana,” says Vomfell. He points to the native and near-native plantings he used that “feel like they were found in a meadow here.”

While the team wanted the residence to fit in, they also wanted it to be aesthetically interesting. So, Pearson flipped the script on a classic lake house. A guest house was erected at the top of the hill, with the main house set below. The entry from the motor court leads to a foyer from which a stone staircase descends into the social spaces at lake level. “This is a home that touches the water,” Pearson says. “So, you’re engaging with the lake.”

A contemporary style was important, but, Pearson asserts, an ultra-sleek modern home was never his goal. It was important, he says, “that you can take your shoes off, walk down to the beach, jump in a boat and come back in soaking wet.” Adds Dunham: “It was much more about organic modernism. Larry was very invested in how his design was working between these materials. You’ve got really beautiful stonework, woodwork, hand-troweled plasterwork and iron elements that he brought in.”

Since the clients didn’t want what Dunham calls “a serious, monochromatic house,” he incorporated color but carefully considered its usage. “The outside view is stunning with the shades of blue and gray-blue. When the lake goes bright, it’s green,” he says. “You’ve got the green of the trees and the colors of the mountains. So those are what you want to celebrate.” The designer worked in verdant tones through furnishings such as teal pendants in the kitchen, a sea-green sofa in the foyer and light green swivel chairs in the living room. Varying shades of sand that nod to the beach set the backdrop.

When Dunham did choose to use other colors—mixing in burnt-orange and saffron-yellow dining chairs among the blue and green ones; designing a sectional upholstered in a pumpkin-colored chenille for the sitting room—he kept them muted rather than bright and intended for them to support the vibrant art. “A lot of the art is quite fresh,” Dunham says. “You didn’t want to put up works that felt sludgy.”

To this end, he hung a vintage tapestry prominently in the dining room. Its black background and bold colors contribute an eye-catching graphic quality and a bit of drama, while the textile itself mutes noise and adds softness against the stone walls and steel-framed windows. The result: A room where dinners last for hours, thanks also to the generously scaled chairs covered in a stain-proof leather that is “semi-indestructible,” says Dunham.

This isn’t the only room for gatherings. The entire house is designed for groups. There’s the cozy nook in the living area warmed by a fireplace—the perfect spot for card games—the inviting orange sectional and the many seating areas out on the deck. Which is precisely the point, Dunham muses. “I look back, and I see the picture over the lake or the chairs around the fire pit and think, ‘that’s somewhere I’d like to be.’ ”

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The Boutique Property With A Subtle Nod To Charleston’s Roaring ’20s {The Boutique Property With A Subtle Nod To Charleston’s Roaring ’20s} – English

The Boutique Property With A Subtle Nod To Charleston’s Roaring ’20s {The Boutique Property With A Subtle Nod To Charleston’s Roaring ’20s} – English

The post The Boutique Property With A Subtle Nod To Charleston’s Roaring ’20s appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A trip to Charleston is a treat unto itself, but this 41-room boutique property—found in the Holy City’s charming French Quarter—makes a commendable effort to sweeten the experience still.

Stepping into The Spectator‘s plush lobby, furnished by designer Jenny Keenan, sets the stage for an indulgent stay marked by complimentary welcome cocktails, on-demand butler service and the option to explore the surrounding cobblestone streets via vintage bikes.

Keenan was inspired to channel the Charleston of the Roaring ’20s. She fused Art Deco glamour with Southern elegance, sourcing de Gournay wallpaper for the check-in desk and mixing Kravet fabrics with Stark rugs and The Urban Electric Co. fixtures.

Works by current and former Charleston artists (Tim Hussey, Sally King Benedict) add to the impact of built-ins by Hostetler Custom Cabinetry, antiqued mirrors by Charleston Architectural Glass and the hotel’s pièce de résistance: a three-tiered custom chandelier hand-strung from 1,800 Murano crystals.

PHOTO COURTESY THE SPECTATOR HOTEL

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Lutie’s Garden Restaurant Opens At Austin’s Commodore Perry Estate {Lutie’s Garden Restaurant Opens At Austin’s Commodore Perry Estate} – english

Lutie’s Garden Restaurant Opens At Austin’s Commodore Perry Estate {Lutie’s Garden Restaurant Opens At Austin’s Commodore Perry Estate} – english

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Photo: Courtesy Commodore Perry Estate, Auberge Resorts Collection

Recently opened at the Commodore Perry Estate in Austin, Lutie’s Garden Restaurant adds one more great reason to visit the lush property.

Designed to meld warm hospitality with the jovial spirit of its Jazz Age legacy, “Lutie’s is delightfully old-fashioned, like the best version of country club-meets-charming garden party,” says creative director and designer Ken Fulk.

Eye-catching details include tumbled black-and-white stone floors and a green latticework ceiling hung with plants; a grand oak bar lit by retro Murano glass chandeliers (above); custom-upholstered furnishings like tufted teal barstools and freestanding scalloped banquettes covered in a bespoke floral print; plus wood-and-brass café tables and chairs with a ticking stripe seat. Head outside to linger even longer on classic wrought-iron pieces covered in Lutie’s signature florals.

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