The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era {The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era} – English

The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era {The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era} – English

The post The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When general contractor Mark Kelley first saw the Woodside, California, dwelling that once belonged to Arjay Miller, former Ford Motor Co. president and retired dean of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, he knew it was something very special. “It was a classic, midcentury, one-story house with tall ceilings and huge windows looking out onto a beautiful backyard,” Kelley says. “The home was really well built, and it was filled with furniture from the 1960s that people today would lose their heads over.”

Upon his death in 2017—at the age of 101—Arjay bequeathed the abode to his son and daughter- in-law, for whom Kelley, architect Steve Simpson, interior designer Linda Sullivan and landscape architect Bob Cleaver dreamed up a renovation honoring the home’s historical style while modernizing it for 21st-century life. “In essence, we tried to make everything better without making anything worse,” Simpson says of the challenge.

It’s another way of saying that central to the renovation was a profound sense of restraint. To that end, the architect reallocated space without changing the structure’s footprint: A couple of bedrooms became a home theater, the area for the kitchen expanded, a wine room was added, and two spaces transformed into the new main bedroom suite. Other elements were carefully preserved. The team left Arjay’s office, clad in walnut paneling, as it has always been, and the original front door received only a small upgrade of fluted glass, for the sake of privacy. Much of the hardware is also original to the abode, just powder coated in a darker finish for a fresh look.

Sullivan and her colleague, design director Silvia Hendrawan, took cues from the home itself as the pair decided how to revamp the interiors. “Arjay’s wife, Frances, was a designer and her taste was obviously fantastic,” Sullivan says. “For us, taking a different viewpoint on the interiors while still achieving the original vibe was really important.” This approach led them to select walnut flooring, millwork and cabinetry—unifying old and new installations throughout—to uphold the original style. They also opted for elevated, natural materials such as marble and fabrics in wool, cotton, mohair and silk to continue the residence’s timeless appeal.

Perhaps the most significant source of inspiration in the dwelling is the grand living room, which Simpson describes as “the kind of room you don’t find often in houses anymore.” It’s a large space with tall ceilings and abundant windows that look out on massive, old oak trees. “The original architect, Willard Doane Rand Jr., really captured California living, that indoor-outdoor feeling that we all like,” Simpson says. Here, Sullivan and Hendrawan riffed on the original design with punches of color in yellow, blue and purple. They replaced the fireplace surround with a limestone version and topped it with an antique mirror that bounces the light around the room. Smaller gathering areas allow for easy circulation and plenty of space for entertaining. “I love how the room feels like the existing home with an updated, modern twist,” Sullivan says.

Of course, some spaces were completely transformed—most notably, the kitchen. The design team opened the space to boost the room’s functionality and made aesthetic changes along the way. Plain-sliced walnut cabinetry by Henrybuilt offers a handsome counterpoint to the marble countertops and waterfall island. The blackened-steel custom hood now serves as a subtle focal point, and a trio of small over- island light fixtures helps illuminate the space without blocking the views to the backyard.

The new main bedroom is also an entirely fresh space. Sullivan incorporated a few nods to midcentury design—a custom, channel-tufted headboard and a bubble-like chandelier—while creating a sophisticated, serene vibe. Textural elements, including a mohair chaise lounge, leather benches and wood side tables, give the tonal room an elegant aesthetic that aligns with the home’s overall style.

The renovation was a kind of history lesson— both about Arjay Miller, whose brilliance in the business world and personal vivacity were well documented, and about the value of paying attention to the past. “Maybe if Arjay hadn’t had a vision for passing this home to his family, someone else might have missed all the beauty that was here already,” Simpson says. “But we respected the heritage of the property and the patriarch of the family, and we came out with something great.”

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Why You Could Say The St. Regis Chicago Is A True Gem {Why You Could Say The St. Regis Chicago Is A True Gem} – English

Why You Could Say The St. Regis Chicago Is A True Gem {Why You Could Say The St. Regis Chicago Is A True Gem} – English

The post Why You Could Say The St. Regis Chicago Is A True Gem appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

dining area and water view from a residence in The St. Regis Chicago

PHOTO COURTESY THE ST. REGIS CHICAGO

Four years in the making by Magellan Development Group, The St. Regis Chicago (rebranded from Vista Tower) officially opened to residents in December 2020.

At 101 stories tall, not only is it the third-loftiest building in Chicago, but it’s also the world’s tallest building designed by a team of women architects and designers, led by architect Jeanne Gang of Chicago’s Studio Gang. As impressive as its pedigree is its faceted exterior inspired by crystals.

Inside, the design continues the gemstone theme for each of the finish packages offered in 393 residences, including 20 single-floor penthouses complementing the 191-room hotel below (opening this summer), as well as a restaurant from Alinea Group. Another residence perk: the 47th amenity floor, with a pool, spa, gym, exhibition cooking area, golf lounge, wine tasting room and more.

“With so many areas,” says Kathleen Dauber, partner with HBA Los Angeles who oversaw the design, “we selected a vocabulary for the flow and open spaces to intuitively guide the guest to each destination within the floor.”

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DashBar Salon In Miami Is A Pink-And-Rose Gold Paradise{DashBar Salon In Miami Is A Pink-And-Rose Gold Paradise} – English

DashBar Salon In Miami Is A Pink-And-Rose Gold Paradise{DashBar Salon In Miami Is A Pink-And-Rose Gold Paradise} – English

The post DashBar Salon In Miami Is A Pink-And-Rose Gold Paradise appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

PHOTO COURTESY DASHBAR

Think pink (and rose gold) at DashBar in Brickell, where the new salon and spa is dripping in dreamy design details and Instagrammable moments.

Bold wallpaper in soft pink-and-cream stripes and metallic geometric shapes from London-based I Love Wallpaper drape the walls, black-and-brass sputnik chandeliers dangle from ceilings, and playful spaces abound with neon signs and plant walls.

Created by entrepreneur Carla Oliva after she tired of running to different spots for beauty services, guests can kick back in custom chairs conceived by Oliva, as a beauty squad performs services such as a manicure, pedicure and blowout all at once. Sixty minutes and you’re out the door—right after snapping your beautified “after” photo in front of one of their fun backdrops.

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The Sport of Kings Finds Broader Audiences {The Sport of Kings Finds Broader Audiences} – English

The Sport of Kings Finds Broader Audiences {The Sport of Kings Finds Broader Audiences} – English

As much of the sports world grapples to stay relevant in an age of digitalization, fast-moving media cycles and shifting consumer preferences, a centuries old gentlemen’s game rooted in tradition is quietly, and rapidly, garnering national acclaim. And it is doing so by eschewing many industry trends.

Polo, the “Sport of Kings,” is hardly a newcomer to the global stage. It was a featured competition in five Olympic Games (1900, ’08, ’20, ’24 and ’36), and the oldest club, the Calcutta Polo Club, dates back to 1862. Artifacts suggest rudimentary versions of the game were played as early as 200 BC—though, by all accounts the modern form originated in India in the mid-19th Century.

The sport’s notoriety spread quickly throughout the late 19th Century and early 20th Century, particularly among Europe’s nobility and upper social classes. It was introduced stateside by James Gordon Bennett, a New York publisher, who hosted the first game in the United States in 1876 after seeing a match during a visit to England a year earlier.   

Yet, for more than a century, polo remained largely out of the mainstream in the U.S., receiving far less fanfare than other equestrian sports like horse racing and rodeo. Its niche positioning owed in part to the rigor of the game and significant costs, which made it largely inaccessible to much of the public.

To be sure, the nature of the game has not changed much. A physically demanding sport, both on horse and rider, polo requires competitors to be in peak condition. It’s not uncommon for a well-trained polo horse to cost as much as $200,000. Considering that riders often change mounts at each of six chukkers, or periods of play in a match, to keep their horses fresh—it’s easy to see how the cost of competitive polo can quickly escalate.

Even today, polo is not on the same plane as most major sports leagues, which is due chiefly, still, to the high bar to entry. Yet, the sport’s allure owes in no small part to that very exclusivity. Traditions remain central to the game—think ceremonial sabrages, champagne toasts and high fashion—which lend an air of sophistication that has drawn crowds hungry for an elevated experience.

In many respects, polo as a sport has shrugged off industry conventions. Rather than marketing to mass audiences, leagues have catered instead to smaller, discerning crowds. Experience is tantamount, which is evident in spectators’ own involvement in a match—like stomping the divots to return a field to a proper condition.

At the same time, the game is expanding its accessibility here in the States. Today, there are nearly 300 polo clubs in the U.S.—the most of any of the 90 countries around the world where the sport is played. Across the country, many clubs have launched programs that invite new players to experience the game without the hefty costs historically associated with the sport.

The result has been a steady growth in the sport. While it’s difficult to track national stats, many leagues report an uptick in participation and public engagement. At the International Polo Club in Palm Beach, Florida, for example, local box office revenue increased 185 percent between 2012 and 2015, including a 133 percent year-over-year gain in 2014, Forbes reports.

It may shock some, too, to know that women are polo’s fastest growing demographic. Female players made up a record 40 percent of membership in the U.S. Polo Association last year, and the number of women’s tournaments has steadily increased over the past five years.

In Sheridan, Wyoming, at the base of the Big Horn Mountains, polo is a staple of the community. Indeed, some of the country’s first matches were played here after English royalty, and with them thoroughbred horses, settled in the area in the late 1800s. Western horsemen began adopting the sport in the early 1900s, when they began selling horses to U.S. Calvary units, used the game as a training exercise.

“In those days, you could get $165 from the Government for a cavalry horse, which wasn’t bad, but you could get $300 for a polo pony,” explains Tommy Wayman, a Big Horn local who, in the 1980s, was the first U.S. player in 30 years to achieve 10-goal status, the game’s highest rank.

“Those cowboys would get an old mallet and they’d go out to the ranches, where they knew they could find horses that were broke to the saddle. Then they’d swing the mallet on them for a little bit, and the next day they’d be able to sell them as polo ponies.”

Today, on nearly any given summer afternoon, one can expect to find a friendly match at the Big Horn Polo Club. Down the road at the Flying H Polo Club, some of the world’s best players train and compete.

Led by U.S.P.A.-certified instructor Megan Flynn, the Big Horn Club now offers polo school to introduce enthusiasts, young and old, to the game. It also started a margarita league, which offers shorter games for novice players as a steppingstone to more competitive play.

“This is where everybody wants to come and play polo during the summer,” Katie Connell, president of the Big Horn Polo Club tells the Casper Star Tribune. “Our polo keeps going. It’s an unbelievable success.”

Seated in cattle country, Sheridan’s polo culture attracts many of the best players from around the world each year. The result is a unique and indelible combination of Western and English horsemanship, which puts a signature flare on the sport. It’s not unusual to see pick-up games played in roping saddles, or for Budweiser to be poured among spectators in place of customary champagne.

In many ways, Sheridan’s adoption of the game reflects its reception across the country. While keeping a foot in tradition, the sport is evolving to be more accessible to the public. It’s at once shedding pretenses that kept some at bay, while still preserving the refinement that contributes to its appeal.

“The best players in the United States are no longer the landed aristocracy,” Alex Webbe, a columnist for the Palm Beach Daily News told the New York Times in 1981. That evolution seems to now be coming full circle. No longer a sport only for society’s elite, polo has established its mass appeal, which will likely only continue to grow.