A 1970s Abode Masters The Feel Of An Old Florida Garden House {A 1970s Abode Masters The Feel Of An Old Florida Garden House} – English

A 1970s Abode Masters The Feel Of An Old Florida Garden House {A 1970s Abode Masters The Feel Of An Old Florida Garden House} – English

The post A 1970s Abode Masters The Feel Of An Old Florida Garden House appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The property is nestled in a golf course community, so it didn’t seem right to pursue a typical coastal look, Davis explains. “We didn’t want it to feel like a beach house, but we did want it to feel like a Florida home,” she says. The abode also needed to reflect the Tatums’ new stage of life, a departure from their larger, more traditional permanent residence in New Hampshire. “Courtney and I set out to create a comfortable space that is both classic and beautiful,” Nancy says. They envisioned an Old Florida-style garden house that feels fresh and welcoming, with wow factors throughout.

They began with the structure’s bones. General contractor John Prendergast took the home down to the studs and, while keeping the layout roughly the same, added a bathroom, reworked doorways and openings, leveled floors and removed and lined walls. “We took it all the way down and then had to put it back together again so we could add the layers of design we wanted,” Davis says. “We were giving the house a soul where there really hadn’t been one before.”

Moldings and trim now infuse each space with character, as do ceiling treatments, including cypress over the living area. “We added intention to the architectural design through these somewhat small but very important changes,” Davis says. New built-ins also add personality: Where a wall once stood, double-sided cabinets face the kitchen on one side and, on the other, serve as bookcases backed with a blue grass-cloth wallcovering for the living area. Another set of cabinetry defines the entry and conceals a bar lined with a patterned antique tile. “It’s this little special jewel box of a spot, and it’s one of the first things you see when you walk in the door,” Davis says. “It sets the tone for the house.”

The showpiece is in the back of the residence: the dining room, lined on its walls and ceiling with an unexpected powder blue lattice. This enchanting space is also the home’s greatest surprise transformation, as it was formerly a step- down, screened porch. “It was an important part of the house that we had to reclaim,” Davis notes. Blurring the line between inside and outside, the room features end chairs and a console table with botanical fabrics to enhance the garden feel. Oversize sheer Roman shades decorate the two sets of sliding doors that open completely to the exterior, highlighting the backyard pond, the greenery and the swan that visits often. “You can’t decide: Are you in an inside space or an outside space?” Davis muses. “Either way, it’s beautiful— and you’d like to sit down.”

The designer created multiple seating areas throughout the residence, including a morning room next to the kitchen furnished with a beaded chandelier, a green sofa and a pair of caned chairs. To capture a subtle sense of place, she incorporated nods to Florida in unexpected ways, like the living area’s blue rattan console table, lampshades with hand-painted palm fronds and Talavera pottery that lines the bookcases.

The color scheme was kept within a narrow scope of blues and greens, creating a smooth flow. “Because of the simple color palette, we had to be intentional with making little statements throughout each space so the house didn’t fall flat,” Davis explains, “so we used different patterns and played with scale.” She outfitted bedrooms with airy wallpapers, accented the living area’s traditional blue floral-printed chairs with pillows in modern punches of yellow and bright teal and played with surfaces, including painting the ceiling of the main bathroom a high- gloss opal lacquer.

As the project’s finishing touch, Nancy selected the artwork for the residence. “I have a new passion of art collecting since this experience,” she says. It’s this kind of inspiring mentality Davis hoped to cultivate for the Tatums in their inviting vacation home. “They wanted it to be a place that people could drop by—and, quite honestly, people do,” she says.

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Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House {Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House} – English

Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House {Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House} – English

The post Organic Restraint Meets Sophistication In A Wisconsin Lake House appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


But take a boat trip along the edges of Lake Mendota and you’ll spot just that. The pared-back residence, distinguished by its mostly limestone-and-glass façade, evokes the essence of California cool—thanks to its architects, Ron Radziner and Leo Marmol, as well as the rest of their team—Stephanie Hobbs, Matt Jackson and Troy Newell.

The homeowners’ previous dwelling, located just down the road, leaned much more traditional. But for their new lakeside abode, on a unique site that sloped gently down to the water, they wanted something special. “We were interested in very simple forms, sort of hovering above this amazing setting,” says Radziner, who worked with landscape architect Lindsay Buck to ensure the environment was cohesive with the structure. “Something where you would come into the home and move through these sculptural forms and then take in beautiful vistas to the lake. We saw the landscape as an opportunity to really create this sort of native prairie with wildflowers and grasses, then slowly work our way down to the house where it would become more open and architectural.”

The streamlined rectilinear design of the residence—built by general contractor Joe Sagona and project manager Aaron Combs—creates a minimalist vibe, as does the restrained palette of limestone and stained-gray oak. But a two-story white circular staircase set against a glass backdrop provides a dramatic visual counter to the straight lines. It’s an unexpected but welcome architectural touch that sets the tone for the interiors created by designers Aimee Wertepny and Jennifer Kranitz. The task, the pair explains, was to create spaces that merge the home’s minimalism with the wife’s taste for polish and sophistication. “There’s a tension between glamorous and organic,” Wertepny says. “The wife really resonates with things that are a bit shiny, reflective and pretty.”

Working with the natural tones of the dwelling’s contextual shell, the designers opted for furnishings in black and white and higher-contrast decor, including a polished hood and full-height hardware on the refrigerators in the kitchen. “There are a lot of moments of reflective elements that felt a bit more glamorous for the wife,” Kranitz says. “We wanted both of these points of view to be really married and feel super seamless and intentional.” Since the soaring windows brought hues of nature into the home, the designers chose not to introduce more color. “We have a lot of green and blue, so there’s a really colorful backdrop,” Kranitz notes. “It made sense to let it be a little easier on the eyes so that we could let some of those other elements shine.”

Mixing finishes—antique brass, polished nickel, and matte black and bronze—throughout the space helped add textural intrigue, as did using materials in unique ways. In the dining room, the custom 17-foot table features Lucite-and-steel legs and the surrounding sculptural dining chairs are embellished with zippers. Upstairs in the main bedroom, an alpaca rug adorns the wall behind the bed, serving as a headboard of sorts. “We’re known for that element of surprise—and we’re always looking for opportunities to put a rug on a wall!” Wertepny laughs. “Could we have had an upholstered king-sized headboard there? Sure, but this is so much more dramatic and customized and really spoke to what the client was looking for—very soft, feminine and glamorous without having a specific sparkle to it.”

To add further coziness to the home, the designers introduced custom millwork and built-ins throughout. Most notable is the display behind the bar for the owners’ extensive tequila collection that also incorporates a series of protruding beams with crystalline pendant lights. “We inherited beautiful bones and a gorgeous set of floor plans,” says Wertepny. “But that was our moment to interject with detailing—something that was very simple and quiet and adds a little nod to the bling.”

The chance to turn tradition on its head made the project all the more fun for the designers. “When people think of a lake house it’s typically not this really sharp, tasteful modern glass box,” Kranitz says. “I’m just always struck by how cool it was that we were able to do this modern spin on a lake home—it feels so good.”

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A Playful Twist On Old Florida Style That Will Put You In Vacation Mode {A Playful Twist On Old Florida Style That Will Put You In Vacation Mode} – English

A Playful Twist On Old Florida Style That Will Put You In Vacation Mode {A Playful Twist On Old Florida Style That Will Put You In Vacation Mode} – English

The post A Playful Twist On Old Florida Style That Will Put You In Vacation Mode appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Although their plan is to eventually live in South Florida full time, the couple wanted to enjoy the property now, with their large extended family. The house, however—mostly beige inside—required some personalized attention. “We really wanted to amp it up a little bit and make it bright, lively and more of what people imagine when they go to Florida,” says interior designer Kristen Rivoli. “You want it to feel relaxing.”

This would be Rivoli’s first project in the region and the third she would complete for these clients, including their main residence. “Their home in Boston is definitely traditional and filled with antiques and oil paintings,” she says. Whereas the couple’s primary house is quiet and neutral, here the interior designer aimed to push them out of their typical style with a little flair for a fresher and more transitional look. Her approach: View their aesthetic through the lens of an Old Florida residence for a design that is classic and timeless.

The owners agreed. They desired a relaxed, informal vibe for the vacation property, with more patterns than they normally favor. This, Rivoli says, “gave us a great opportunity here to really be playful with the colors.” To balance the clients’ traditional leanings with a Florida bent, she introduced classical furnishings in bright tones, such as a thin yellow-and-white stripe on the living area sofa, which rests on a patterned yellow rug. In a similar move, the interior designer paired vintage pieces with more modern ones, like the living area’s Parsons-style coffee table countering rattan armchairs holding blue- and-white cushions. The formerly dark pantry, too, was given a playful runner and lighter cabinets. “We painted them what we call our ‘Palm Beach Pink’ color,” Rivoli says. “Now it’s a very bright and cheery hallway.”

The bedrooms in particular are amped with pattern and color. In a guest space, a red-orange wallcovering is a balanced backdrop for unexpected doses of vibrant green, seen on a pair of beds with patterned upholstered frames and in the abstract botanical scene of an oversize graphic painting occupying a wall. “We pushed the wife out of her comfort zone a little bit with the art,” Rivoli says. “It really makes that a memorable space.” The wife loves coral, which the interior designer infused in the main bedroom on the draperies and wrapping the four-poster bed. She hung an Old Floridian-style lamp from the double-height ceiling for a dash of quirkiness, while ceramic lamps add an old-world aura atop vintage wood bedside tables that have a bamboo detail. “They’re so well made,” Rivoli says of vintage pieces. “Many of them are so solid, and that’s why they’ve lasted so long.”

Many of the home’s furnishings and fabrics, like the family room’s sofa and tasseled ottomans, are indoor-outdoor, giving the residence a casual elegance amid its framed artwork and gold sconces. “We wanted it to feel like if the clients had a dressed-up occasion, the house supported that,” Rivoli says. “But if they had bathing suits on and sandy feet, they’re not going to worry about sitting there.”

That strategy comes in handy for guests coming from the property’s outdoor space, where the owners refinished the pool and installed a hot tub. Landscape designer Nelson Logal conceived a minimalist look for the previously overcrowded grounds, removing more than 20 trees, including Alexandra palms and overgrown magnolias. This made room for plantings such as flowering yellow thryallis, red Jatropha and climbing hibiscus next to the outdoor fireplace to add touches of color amid the greenery. “It’s a retreat for the owners just to relax,” Logal says. “It’s a hideaway.” In the front, fragrant gardenias and a new path of palm trees lead to the door—where, Rivoli expects, her busy clients leave their stress behind before entering. “What I really hope is that when you walk in, you’re going to take this deep breath and feel instant relaxation and melting away,” she says.

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Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences {Mountain Views Bring The Drama At These Luxurious Vail Residences} – English

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The recent debut of Altus Vail, a luxurious 15-residence property adjacent to Vail Village, was a major milestone for the mountain enclave, which hasn’t seen a significant new development in 10 years. And it couldn’t have come at a better time: In 2020, just as demand for residential real estate in the valley soared, inventory dropped to historic lows. Altus’ offerings look and live like single-family homes with an intimate setting and private 8-foot-deep balconies accessed via retractable sliding doors that facilitate indoor-outdoor living—and dramatic mountain and ski-run views.

Designed by Denver-based architecture firm 359 Design with interiors by OCG’s Kellye O’Kelly, the mountain-contemporary dwellings also offer finishes not often seen in multifamily developments, from quartz-clad kitchens with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances to stone fireplaces inlaid with sleek metal accents. But it’s the rare single-family home that offers this kind of access—the Golden Peak and Vail Village base areas are both just a short walk away.

PHOTO COURTESY ALTUS VAIL

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Check Out South Florida’s Latest Best-In-Glass High-Rises {Check Out South Florida’s Latest Best-In-Glass High-Rises} – English

Check Out South Florida’s Latest Best-In-Glass High-Rises {Check Out South Florida’s Latest Best-In-Glass High-Rises} – English

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PHOTO BY LPG, COURTESY MONAD TERRACE/JDS DEVELOPMENT GROUP

MONAD TERRACE

Light, water, glass and steel beautifully intermingle at the recently opened Monad Terrace, aptly called “the reflection machine” by architect Jean Nouvel, who collaborated with architect Kobi Karp on the 59-unit Miami Beach project hovering above Biscayne Bay. “The cutting-edge crystalline tower and custom honeycomb glass façade brilliantly reflect the sun and surrounding water to create a glittering effect,” Karp says of the tropical-modern design. Expansive terraces sheltered by climbing gardens and retractable floor-to-ceiling windows blend the indoor-outdoor experience.


Lobby with hand-blown glass chandelier

PHOTO COURTESY SEAGLASS, JUPITER ISLAND.

SEAGLASS, JUPITER ISLAND

Another stunner, SeaGlass, Jupiter Island (above), stands out as the first new construction in the area in decades. Slated for fall 2022, the beachfront condominium by Fontainebleau Development presents finishes such as wood paneling, coral and limestone-clad walls and floors. “Our inspiration was the contemporary beach houses of Miami and Malibu,” says Courtney Brannan of Champalimaud Design. A showpiece is the lobby chandelier, fashioned with hand-blown glass reminiscent of the waves striking the shoreline of nearby Blowing Rocks Preserve.

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Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List {Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List} – English

Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List {Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List} – English

The post Plant Lovers: Add This Colorado Shop To Your Must-Visit List appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Mother-daughter duo Betsy and Megan Jamison have always had an eye for beauty. Before launching Littleton home-goods and luxury floral boutique Conservatrice in 2015, Betsy worked as a professional photographer and interior decorator, while Megan was a pastry chef with a knack for floral design.

With their current creative outlet—housed in a charming storefront on Littleton’s historic Main Street—the pair have indulged their taste for the unusual and dramatic. “We love abundance and old-world European styling; decadent paintings and English gardens inspire us,” says Megan, who channels these themes into romantic floral designs that incorporate seasonal and locally grown blooms.

In addition to custom and pre-designed bouquets, the duo offers houseplants of all sizes, along with an assortment of ceramic pots and planters in styles that range from simple to timeworn. “We’re always on the lookout for quirky vessels,” Megan says. “We don’t like pigeonholes or relying on a certain genre,” Betsy adds. “Conservatrice means curator in French, and we thrive on surprising our customers with everything from candles and textiles and interesting wall art to stacks of pots and lovely smelling hand creams. Our aim is to guide customers to discover what they love, because when you collect what you’re drawn to, it always works.”

PHOTO COURTESY CONSERVATRICE

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Take A Peek Inside This New Addition To The Chicago Skyline {Take A Peek Inside This New Addition To The Chicago Skyline} – English

Take A Peek Inside This New Addition To The Chicago Skyline {Take A Peek Inside This New Addition To The Chicago Skyline} – English

The post Take A Peek Inside This New Addition To The Chicago Skyline appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

JDL Development had quite the undertaking when designing and building one of the largest mixed-use developments Chicago has seen in nearly 25 years. But as of this fall, the two-tower One Chicago, with three options for rentals and 77 exclusive residences, is partially open—and it’s spectacular.

“It is exciting to see One Chicago help to transform the incredible skyline as a wonderful new addition to River North and the Gold Coast,” says Jim Letchinger, CEO and founder of JDL Development.

Among the amenities are the bi-level Life Time athletic resort and spa, a rooftop pool, a golf simulator, and grocery delivery from the new Whole Foods on the ground level. Inside individual units, homeowners enjoy smart lighting controls throughout, European oak floors, porcelain-clad primary bathrooms and custom O’Brien Harris kitchen cabinetry.

Now that you can leave home, you may never want to.

PHOTOS COURTESY JDL DEVELOPMENT

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An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

The post An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It’s a far cry from the day when architect Carlos Alvarez and designer Carolyn Morris first saw the dwelling. “Back then, there was no rear garden to speak of, and the home was designed to look inward,” says the architect.

Everything changed when a large adjoining lot came up for sale and the owners (a couple with school-age children) snapped it up. Suddenly, the house was open to a multitude of exciting new possibilities. “They went from a small lawn to a giant garden,” notes Alvarez. “Now there were options. We looked at several, including adding a large addition to the house, but we decided to shift the interior perspective 100 percent to look outside to the new backyard.”

To embrace the lush setting designed by landscape architects Adam Hallauer and Collin Bentley, Alvarez and Morris—partners in business and life—worked with designer Emily Young Alford and general contractor Dave Mosely to gut the home for a fresh start. In addition to making way for a modern interior aesthetic and erasing a confusing layout, starting from scratch gave the team an opportunity to open the rear walls to the garden with a series of large windows and floor-to-ceiling folding doors. The reimagined layout focuses on social events both large and small and seems to draw visitors outside where an architectural pavilion that’s crisscrossed by iron girders awaits.

From the front door, the new story unfolds beginning with a geometric floor composed of taupe travertine and charcoal marble. “The entry is large and very tall, so we created a patterned floor that grounds the space and makes it feel cozier,” says Morris. “Plus, it introduces the clean and modern palette.” Visitors will note another design motif here with a 50-foot wall of rift-cut white oak paneling that runs the length of the first floor. “It’s something like the spinal cord of the home. It’s also warm, organic and modern,” notes Morris. But this is not a feature that’s solely about form—it also contains storage and screens a set of elevator doors.

The main floor is dedicated to the social needs of the family. “They wanted spaces for different types of gatherings,” explains the architect. “There’s a large kitchen with a distinct dining island and a banquette-surrounded table for the family, a separate dining room for entertaining, a formal living room, a family room and a multipurpose room that serves as a study and a music room.”

Upper floors are for family, with one level reserved for the kids and another dedicated
to adult spaces for work and relaxation. “We changed the circulation on the second and third floors. On the kids’ level there’s now room for a lounge in addition to the bedrooms. On the parents’ floor there’s a more luxurious primary suite with room for an office and individual closets,” says Alvarez. Morris adds, “Having private work and play spaces for adults and kids is perfect for a family. They can retreat for privacy or come together to share interests.”

Whether rooms are for individual or group pursuits, Morris gave them an enfolding nature. “I wanted to wrap each room in a distinct material, such as wood or fabric,” she says. “This softened the backgrounds, making great backdrops for the sculptural furniture we selected. Each piece is very intentional and edited, which results in a graphic composition.” That purposeful nature was applied to every element of the house. “The design team created unusual detailing that required ingenuity to build,” notes Mosely. “We worked closely together to make it a reality.” Alvarez recalls the large amount of time and care that went into the smallest features, noting how he worked with Mike Scott of 5280 Custom Cabinetry on elements such as the minimal handles on the pocket doors and the seamless paneling. The labor was not lost on the clients. “These are people who put a lot of thought into things,” Morris says. “They appreciate features that are well done.”

Today, whether relaxing beside the hearth in the living room or lounging by the outdoor fireplace on the pavilion, the family enjoys the sophisticated and serene nature of their new home. “If I used one word to describe the house, I’d choose ‘peaceful,’” says Morris. “It’s a very restful environment.”

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Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence {Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence} – English

Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence {Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence} – English

The post Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


le Midi when he saw To Catch a Thief. “I love the people, the language, the food and wine, the Louis XVI furniture and the architecture,” he says. And the home, named Maison Lumière, is the embodiment of all he admires.

From Èze to Draguignan, Paul and Audrey have vacationed often in the region, enjoying summertime brocantes and alfresco dining at local bistros. Distilling those memories into a visual wonderland befitting an L.A. neighborhood provided a sensory-driven design brief that captured architect Paul Williger’s imagination. “I welcomed the adventure,” Williger says. “You don’t see a lot of Provençal style here, even though the vernacular is appropriate to the Southern California climate.”

Working with general contractors Jim Hanley and Megan Turner, Williger crafted an authentic-feeling home, right down to operable wooden shutters, but kept it “cleaner, fresher—like we were updating an old apartment in Paris,” he explains. “The original home was compressed, so adding a second story allowed us to open up to the yard.” To that end, the front door was glazed, ground-floor walls were replaced with bay windows and French doors, and the upstairs bedrooms were given balconies. “It’s an oasis,” adds Hanley, noting that plenty of house can be realized on a small lot, “if it’s laid out well.” (This home is just about 2,800 square feet.) “It’s also about quality,” he says. For example, the team tested many finishes to achieve the perfect hue and traditional smooth finish of Provençal stucco, and great effort was made to source and match wood flooring and roof tiles to the ones the Hannemans had already found in France.

Paul, who is studying for his Master of Interior Architecture degree at UCLA, observes that French design is like French fashion: “It looks effortless yet is clearly considered.” The home’s interiors, realized by the couple’s longtime designer Elizabeth Dinkel, bear out this truism. “They represent the culling of many years of collecting—basically our favorite things—pulled together with the help of Lizzie’s amazing eye,” says Paul. He points to objects like the Neoclassical side tables in the family room found at Le Marché aux Puces de Paris Saint-Ouen. Starting with a neutral backdrop to support the couple’s art collection, she began layering in playful pieces such as the Vladimir Kagan sofa—the first piece the couple bought for the project—in the living room. “They liked the contrast with the antiques,” the designer notes.

Elsewhere, Dinkel combined a bench covered in leopard-print silk velvet and the Lucite lamps by Pierre Cardin. In the dining room, she surrounded a contemporary steel table with the couple’s Louis XVI-style chairs, adding café curtains that billow in the breeze. “Our intention was to flood the room with light while still providing a bit of privacy,” she says. “We wanted to highlight the style of the windows and the decorative window hardware without obstructing it.” And in the Hannemans’ bedroom are a Piero Lissoni platform bed and Murano glass lamps. “I love the mix of periods,” she says, equating the home’s style to the decadently blasé vibe of St. Tropez’s famed Club 55.

But it’s the exterior spaces, inspired in part by the legendary designer François Catroux’s gardens at Les Ramades and conceived with another longtime Hanneman collaborator, landscape designer Nikila Rigby Ellis, that perhaps feels the most Provençal-like. “Large trees make a garden feel bigger,” notes Ellis. She placed a pair of fruitless olive trees in the front yard and added cypress for color and verticality, boxwoods as sculptural elements and jasmine and citrus for fragrance. Because the property is small, Ellis employed another clever trick: utilizing crushed limestone for the hardscape. “By not defining a driveway and walkways, it gives a more expansive feel.” The result is a garden that “lends itself to hospitality,” she says.

Whether the Hannemans are hosting friends or family or just enjoying the house à deux, they are assured enchantment. “There’s a magical quality of light and peace here,” says Paul. “It’s the indoor-outdoor ease of life that we so love.”

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From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family {From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family} – English

From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family {From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family} – English

The post From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The familial relationship provided a major advantage from the get-go, thanks to the couple’s intimate knowledge—and long-held admiration—of Del Piero’s design prowess. “We’ve spent enough time in Michael Del Piero creations in Chicago and the Hamptons to know that we like what she does,” says her son-in-law. “She treated us like real clients. Each proposal became more and more tailored to us.”

Del Piero went beyond simply painting the interiors. That was just one part of the personalization campaign she undertook for the couple. “There was certainly less to do than ground-up construction,” Del Piero says; however she admits that the work was still extensive. “It needed more character. We ripped out some built-ins in the family room and replaced them with the concrete fireplace,” she explains. “We completely changed the fireplace in the living room.” In the kitchen, she used the existing cabinets and millwork, but the room had to be pulled apart, repainted and put back together.

Once all the painting and structural changes were complete, it was time for furnishings and art. “We began from scratch,” the daughter notes, “which was really nice because we could make them work perfectly with the house.” The living room started with a large painting by William McLure, an artist whom Del Piero exhibits in her Hamptons gallery, and whom her daughter follows on Instagram. “My daughter was like, ‘Mom, you sell his work?’ ” Del Piero says, laughing at the coincidence. “She saw that painting and we built the living room around it. She’s really got a great eye for art.” In addition to taking the lead on finding most of the art for the home, Del Piero’s daughter also joined her mom to shop for accessories and vintage pieces. “They were fun mother-daughter excursions,” says the designer.

In the dining area just off the kitchen, Del Piero’s daughter helped with another find: the vintage table that looks custom made for the space. “I used to work in personal shopping at Barneys and they called me because this table was broken and they were throwing it away,” she says. “But they knew my mom’s line of business and thought she might want it.” The broken table leg was an easy fix, and then Del Piero turned to local restoration company Kristopher’s Furniture Services, who matched the original wood exactly to give it a more dining-friendly width. Above the table hangs a custom light fixture by found-metal artist Lucy Slivinski. The couple knew Slivinski’s work from other Del Piero projects that feature her showstopping chandeliers. “It’s really special. Lucy made it just for them and it makes the space,” says the designer.

While the majority of the furnishings were new to the couple, Del Piero didn’t forget that this project was all about family. She incorporated two of her son-in-law’s heirlooms—an armoire in the nursery that’s now painted a glossy blue and a chandelier in the main suite’s bathroom—into the decor. It didn’t hurt that her son-in-law has a natural eye for design. “He is incredibly interested in all of it,” Del Piero says. “We have an ongoing family joke that he’s really a designer. He’s going to leave his law practice and come work with me.”

Though that’s not likely to happen any time soon, the couple have only happy memories of the process. They were so delighted with the result that when they learned they were expecting a second child, they called Del Piero to help them finish a playroom and nursery, just in time to welcome her new grandson.

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