A Design Collaboration Leads To A Lasting Friendship {A Design Collaboration Leads To A Lasting Friendship}-English

A Design Collaboration Leads To A Lasting Friendship {A Design Collaboration Leads To A Lasting Friendship}-English

Bich and Laurie Kracum have known designer Sofia Joelsson since 2003, when they hired her to design their first Florida home on Miami’s Ocean Drive. Not only were the Kracums, who divide their time between the Midwest and Florida, pleased with the final design, they also became friends with Joelsson along the way. So, it was a no-brainer that she would design their latest home, a penthouse on Fisher Island, an exclusive enclave south of Miami.

The Kracums were ready for a quieter existence–plus, they needed a home with better accessibility, since Laurie had suffered an injury that required her to use a wheelchair. “I wanted anyone to walk in and think, above all else, ‘what a beautiful design,’” says Joelsson on her design approach.

The result? A sprawling penthouse with concrete-style floors, warm walnut accents and sleek Italian furniture by the likes of Minotti and B&B Italia. Not to mention, three outdoor terraces overlooking bustling downtown Miami.

“Sofia is a delight to work with and also a really good friend,” says Rich, who along with Laurie, is thrilled with their new home. “The process of building and the fun we had together still resonates throughout the whole place. When you walk in, you just feel good.”

The post A Design Collaboration Leads To A Lasting Friendship appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look {An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look} – English

There are many reasons to update a home: to make it more current, to expand, or simply to change things up.

All of the above applied for the owners of an Aspen house, but the couple also found another, far more unique reason to invest in a big renovation: uninvited bears.

“They came in through the screens before we had air conditioning,” the wife explains, noting that one giant even feasted on leftover birthday cake.

In addition to adding A/C, interior designer Maria Bordelon and architect Gretchen Greenwood took the home in a more modern direction by installing metal-frame windows, incorporating textural furnishings and introducing unique accents, such as a console table with a glossy automotive finish and beaten copper wall panels.

“We used metals throughout the house but very judiciously to provide a little relief from the heavier materials,” Bordelon explains, noting the result is a far cry from the look the dwelling sported in the 1993 cult film Aspen Extreme when it had a swimming pool in the basement and a rather dated sunken conversation pit. “Everywhere the owners look, something is beautiful, and they enjoy that as their daily environment.”

The post An Aspen Getaway Sports A Clean, Contemporary Look appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Colorado Family Home Is Designed For Views {A Colorado Family Home Is Designed For Views} – English

A Colorado Family Home Is Designed For Views {A Colorado Family Home Is Designed For Views} – English

This house is a great example of how contemporary can be really warm,” says designer Kam Davies of a residence she recently designed for a young family in Snowmass Village, Colorado. “There’s just something approachable about it. It’s meant to be lived in.”

The homeowners, Christine and Andrew Light, had been living in San Francisco but wanted to return to the Centennial State and give their children the outdoor lifestyle–skiing, hiking and biking–that Andrew had enjoyed as a kid. They also envisioned a house that allowed them to enjoy the surroundings right from the comfort of home.

The resulting design offers massive windows and an L-shaped deck, all of which focus on Mount Daly in the distance. “We wanted to maximize views and get light in at every opportunity,” says architect Bill Lueck, who added dormers to the upper floor, as well as a large glass panel at the entrance.

Inside, Davies echoed the landscape with a neutral palette and sculptural furnishings, like the Noguchi coffee table in the living area. Color she left primarily to artwork by local creatives.

“Both Christine and Andrew have a solid appreciation for the arts, and Christine has a great appreciation for Asian culture–its restraint and simplicity,” Davies adds. “The interiors here are all about texture and tone as opposed to a massing of things.”

The post A Colorado Family Home Is Designed For Views & Play appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op {A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op} – English

When it came down to the transformation of his 1,800-square-foot co-op, advertising executive Bob Jeffrey tapped architect Luca Andrisani to take on the task.

In addition to sharing a passion for Italy, the two bonded over a love of modern design, Italian movies and the joys of storytelling.

“It’s hard for me to design without meaning, to just make something pretty,” says Andrisani.

The almost obsessive details in one particular movie, “I Am Love,” set in Milan’s 1930s-built Villa Nechhi, raised the design bar.

To update the interiors of the apartment, builder Chip Brian gutted two bathrooms, expanded the kitchen and reconfigured the powder room. He also created a new pass-through room that houses the client’s collection of John F. Kennedy memorabilia.

Artisans at Atelier Viollet created luxurious wall surfaces with cane, goatskin (parchment) and straw marquetry. Macassar ebony and rift sawn whitewashed oak also provide rich backdrops for the furnishings — mostly a mix of midcentury Italian, punctuated with lush cashmeres, mohair velvets and silks.

“I always worked with very strong creative people,” says Bob. “Luca raised the bar for interior design. For me, aesthetics are key. And this place is a work of art.”

The post A Passion For Italy Inspires An Upper East Side Co-Op appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Hillsborough Home Offers More Than Meets the Eye {A Hillsborough Home Offers More Than Meets the Eye} – English

A Hillsborough Home Offers More Than Meets the Eye {A Hillsborough Home Offers More Than Meets the Eye} – English

The house that architects Joshua Aidlin and Peter Larsen devised in Hillsborough, California, appears as an enormous glass pavilion. It incorporates rammed earth walls in addition to glass ones, and it’s topped with a kite-like asymmetrical butterfly roof.

“Contemporary design practices are too driven by optics and making a great image for the Internet,” says Larsen. “A house is not a purely visual object. We’re much more interested in creating an embodied human experience.”

The rammed earth walls supply sustainability and texture for the building, while the glass walls allow sunlight to pour into the rooms and offer the residents a connection to the landscape.

Designer Gary Hutton arranged modernist low-profile furnishings with an earthy palette that speak to the clients’ preferences and blend with the landscape.

“I did a custom rug with greens and amber,” says Hutton, who selected Living Divani sofas covered with pale pumpkin-colored chenille and leather.

Hutton brought brighter hues into the nearby dining area by surrounding the geometric wood dining table with chairs that showcase coral-colored leather.

“The Creation Baumann drapery fabric has been cut and sewn back together with bright orange thread, giving it this very sophisticated patchwork design,” the designer says. “The cotton was grown in the United States and processed in a zero-waste factory in Switzerland.”

In the end, the residence offers sustainable spaces the owners and their visitors can enjoy for years to come.

“This house is a LEED Platinum-certified home with net-zero energy,” Aidlin says. “We wanted the building to be as sculpturally dynamic as it is practical.”

The post A Hillsborough Home Offers More Than Meets the Eye appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Seamless Collab Leads To An Expertly Designed Home {A Seamless Collab Leads To An Expertly Designed Home} – English

A Seamless Collab Leads To An Expertly Designed Home {A Seamless Collab Leads To An Expertly Designed Home} – English

Designer Hillary Littlejohn Scurtis took on this Miami-area project looking for a challenge, but what she didn’t expect was a blossoming friendship and a professional partner.

“It’s very unusual for a client to have a strong eye for design and also be receptive to their designer’s vision,” says Scurtis, who eventually went on to hire her client, Maria Corina Sosa.

With a passion for interiors and knowing exactly the aesthetic she wanted, Sosa assisted the designer in revamping her family’s Brickell Key apartment.

Hoping to update the floor plan by incorporating an ocean view from each room, the homeowner entrusted Scurtis with the monumental task of reconfiguring the space for maximum functionality. The designer opened up the kitchen to the dining room and incorporated some of her client’s belongings into the renovation.

“I wanted to keep some antiques that had sentimental value and a story,” says Sosa, whose taste, over time, skewed a bit more contemporary. The mix of pieces allows the interiors to feel modern, yet grounded.

The completed space also features art hung in a gradient fashion, with black pieces on the east side of the home and white works in the west, while those in the middle dwell in gray tones.

The post A Seamless Collab Leads To An Expertly Designed Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting {A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting} – English

In the cooler autumn months, Matt and Paige Shoberg and their young sons enjoy the open and airy space overlooking the swimming pool and spa behind their home in West Lake Hills, Texas. Furman + Keil Architects completely reimagined the residence with a new plaster skin and two new additions. “It’s so peaceful,” explains the busy mother. “I don’t get a lot of peace.”

The original abode’s traditional red brick gave way to thick plaster, with its multiple gables and adornments eliminated in favor of streamlined standing seam metal detail running underneath the roofline. A steel and glass bridge, which houses the dining room, passes over a dip in the land, connecting the existing structure to one of the home’s two new wings.

While Matt, a home builder, executed the architects’ vision for the new additions and completely reconfigured the interior, Paige worked with interior designer Wendy Williamson to select finishes and furnishings.

“With almost every selection on this house, we asked, ‘Have we seen it before?’ And if the answer was ‘yes,’ we didn’t want to do it,” Paige explains, pointing to the black slate flooring and bespoke light fixtures throughout. “We love it here.”

The post A Rustic Texas Home Embraces Its Natural Setting appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life {A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life} – English

A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life {A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life} – English

Intent on restoring the character of a Willis Polk house overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge, a San Francisco couple hired a design team to help refresh the space and modify past renovations that left the rooms in their 1915 residence feeling a bit disjointed.

“I’m a huge fan of consistency,” says the wife. “I’d rather have consistency of materials and finishes instead of making each room unique. It’s more soothing.”

To keep the top and ground floors in sync with the home’s original vibes, James Hunter and Shannon Jue, from the Wiseman Group Interior Design, reconfigured the spaces, reintroduced traditional millwork and worked in classic, yet modern, furniture silhouettes.

The designers also lightened up that palette of the house, particularly in the entry hall, which previously felt brooding with its mahogany-stained gumwood paneling. The wood was stripped, bleached and touched up to make it “perfectly imperfect,” says Jue.

In the end, the homeowners were left with a cohesive look befitting both their casual lifestyle and the home’s historic roots.

The post A 1915 Home With Golden Gate Views Gets A New Life appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Colorado Home Rocks Kid-Proof Global Style {A Colorado Home Rocks Kid-Proof Global Style} – English

A Colorado Home Rocks Kid-Proof Global Style {A Colorado Home Rocks Kid-Proof Global Style} – English

When her longtime clients requested interiors that reflect their love of world travel, Denver designer Ashley Campbell delivered with a mix of new and antique furnishings, accessories and artifacts sourced from points across the globe.

But hidden within the Cherry Hills Village home’s eclectic mix of forms and patterns is functionality befitting the active young family who lives here.

In the music room, for example, a trio of antique metal wheels doubles as a kid-deterring fireplace screen. Kitchen bar stools–upholstered with a washable animal-print fabric from Lee Industries–pull up to a stain- and scratch-proof Caesarstone countertop.

In the dining room, Campbell covered a pair of settees with an outdoor Sunbrella fabric from Pindler. “You can literally take the slipcovers outside and hose them off,” she says.

And though the great room’s black, Chesterfield-style leather sofas are perfect for the “Ralph Lauren-meets-tribal look” Campbell was going for, her choice was driven by kid-friendly function: “That tight sofa back paired with loose throw pillows is so low-maintenance,” she says. “It’s a really cool marriage of form and function.”

The post A Colorado Home Rocks Kid-Proof Global Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Sustainability in Fashion: A Passing Fad or the New Standard? {Sustainability in Fashion: A Passing Fad or the New Standard?} – English

Sustainability in Fashion: A Passing Fad or the New Standard? {Sustainability in Fashion: A Passing Fad or the New Standard?} – English

From food to fashion, sustainability has become a forward principle in recent years. Bolstered by a shift towards social accountability, many consumer brands have put a heightened value on doing good with their products—whether that be reducing their environmental footprint, supporting eco-friendly causes or using business models as a vehicle for change.

This trend towards environmental stewardship has been embraced by the fashion world, and, some will say, not only embraced but driven forward. Certainly, the movement has opened a door of opportunity for brands that emphasize ecological responsibility.

Whether proactive or reactive, it makes sense that brands of nearly every caliber have begun to put a priority on environmental stewardship. Global textile production has more than doubled over the past 15 years, according to reports by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. A full 85 percent of discarded clothing ends up in landfills in the United States—a cycle that produces more greenhouse emissions than sea and air shipping combined, Fortune reports.    

Yet, while the fashion industry has made strides towards greater sustainability, progress slowed last year, according to the latest Pulse of the Fashion Industry report. The annual study found that adoption of socially and environmentally conscious practices improved in 2018, but at a slower rate than in 2017. The industry’s score rose four points to 42 out of 100, which was less than the six-point gain a year earlier.

“The fashion industry is still far from sustainable,” a summary of the report states plainly. “Furthermore, the findings demonstrate that fashion companies are not implementing sustainable solutions fast enough to counterbalance the negative environmental and social impacts of the rapidly growing fashion industry.”

The amount of clothing purchased globally each year is expected to rise 63 percent by 2030 to 102 million tons. On the current trajectory, the report notes, that growth will cause the gap between sustainability progress and industry output to widen.

However, many industry leaders see an opportunity to connect with audiences and bolster their brands through elevated sustainability initiatives. Their vision—fewer, better products that reflect consumers’ interest and lifestyles. Less mass production and more personalization.

Sustainability “totally fits with what we believe in,” Anya Hindmarch, founder of the British handbag label told Fortune’s Most Powerful Women International Summit this week. Customers now expect a personal story behind the product, rather than “fast fashion,” she added.

“Nowadays [consumers] don’t just want an object, they want something to talks to them,” said Kristina Blahnik, speaking at the same event.

The approach of designing products targeted to consumers’ interests may be a winning strategy, and one that may help reduce the fashion industry’s footprint. Seventy-three percent of Millennials, the fastest-growing wealth segment, say they are willing to pay more for sustainable brands, according to Neilson’s 2015 Global Corporate Sustainability report. Eighty-one percent say they expect companies they support to make public declarations of corporate responsibility.

More than prior generations, Millennials are not content to simply observe, either. They are more likely to actively engage in the conversation. Nearly three-quarters say they will voice their opinions about a company’s social policies, according to research by Cone Communications, and with the advent of social media, they have a bullhorn to do so.

Certainly, commercial sustainability has ebbed and flowed over the past several decades. But the cultural shift among Millennials—a population that exceeds 80 million in the United States alone and which stands to inherit the largest wealth transfer in history (an estimated $30 trillion from Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers over the next 30 years)—suggests environmental awareness is more than just a passing fad.

How the fashion industry responds may well determine the future of many leading brands—and open the door to newcomers. In an era where experience is its own currency, it seems designers would be wise to follow those leaders who are personalizing their products, and reducing waste in the process.