An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined {An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined} – English

An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined {An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined} – English

The post An Arizona Family’s Mountain Home Goes Rustic Yet Refined appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

It began as a vision for a mountain getaway, a place that would offer an Arizona couple a mix of quiet and family time. With their children grown and starting families of their own, the idea of a multigenerational retreat took root, and the husband set about scouring listings for a home where everyone could gather for vacations and holidays. Prospects looked dim when his search stretched to two years, and then he saw it: a house on three levels perched near hiking trails and skiing in winter. “It was perfect,” he remembers.

Perfect in theory, that is. Built in 1997, the house had the square footage the couple wanted, but the finishes were dated, and the layout needed work. “You had to have some imagination,” the husband explains. “We walked through and said, ‘We could do this, we could do that.’ ” To make their dreams a reality, he and his wife reached out to designer Laura Kehoe, whom they’d collaborated with previously.

The couple’s Paradise Valley residence had been Kehoe’s first commission when she launched her Scottsdale firm in 2010, and she later worked on their Southern California beach house. The designer understands their love of rooms that are traditional with a “kick your feet up” vibe, she says, but this was an opportunity to give them something fresh. “I wanted it to feel different, not like their main home,” says Kehoe, “I wanted them to feel like they were getting away.”

Kehoe happens to be very skilled at creating environments that not only complement their inhabitants but have a sense of place. The Paradise Valley residence, with its warm tones and intricate details, set a more formal tone, while in the mountains, “there was a huge importance placed on comfort,” Kehoe says. “This was easy, because with cooler temperatures, we were able to utilize extra soft and cozy fabrics.”

Before Kehoe could get to work, architect Anne Sneed began conceptualizing how the interior architecture could meet the needs of the growing family for years to come. She drew up plans for a host of changes that included redesigning the lower level to accommodate an expanded family room, a bar and a bunkroom, as well as enclosing the staircase up to the main level to ensure that noise wouldn’t travel upstairs.

General contractor Ryan McCormick joined the team and proposed ways to replace the home’s existing honey-colored woodwork with walnut–a request from the husband. He wrapped the exposed ceiling beams and trimmed the windows and doors with wide walnut moldings. “Originally, there were standard 3-inch moldings,” McCormick says. “Now they range from 4 to 7 inches, which adds mass and interest.”

Reclaimed brick from New York gave the new downstairs bar a pub feel, while silvery-gray barnwood lent rustic character to the adjacent powder room. Upstairs in the kitchen, the dated yellow-pine cabinets and tile counters were replaced with a sophisticated mix of Calacatta marble and honed black granite, walnut and silver-gray cabinetry, and a backsplash of gray ceramic tile. Counter chairs in tones of gray–with solid leather seats and fabric print backs–complete the look.

“It’s not a modern home, but it has cleaner elements than we’ve used with these clients,” explains Kehoe. Pointing to the blue-gray millwork used on all three levels, she adds, “That stormy color reminded us of the mountains, but here it’s more ‘mountain modern.’ ”

As the bones of the house took shape, Kehoe began selecting a range of fabrics to give the living room depth and texture, including chesterfield-style armchairs with a rich gray leather frame and contrasting velvet pillows. Plaid wool throw pillows add extra warmth. “We wanted the woodwork to tell the story of the house,” she says. “So, we balanced it with soft fabrics and kept the colors neutral so none of them would overpower the house.”

The dwelling sleeps 21, and two bedrooms on the top floor are designed to do double duty for the couple’s children and grandchildren with built-in bunks and king-size beds extending from inviting walnut niches below. For the bunks, Kehoe and her team specified industrial-steel ladders guaranteed to hold up to wear and tear. “Everything was meant to take a beating,” she says. “It was a very important consideration that we thought through on every single decision–everything had to stand the test of time.”

“Laura thought of everything,” says the husband. “We wanted an elegant house, but also a place that people could enjoy and not be afraid to sit on a chair. Here we can be upstairs enjoying a book and the fire, and the kids can be downstairs, and everyone’s happy.”

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Pushing Your Boundaries Does Wonders For Creativity. Just Ask Designer And Artist Teresa Davis. {Pushing Your Boundaries Does Wonders For Creativity. Just Ask Designer And Artist Teresa Davis.} – English

Pushing Your Boundaries Does Wonders For Creativity. Just Ask Designer And Artist Teresa Davis. {Pushing Your Boundaries Does Wonders For Creativity. Just Ask Designer And Artist Teresa Davis.} – English

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teresa davis portrait

Collected, crafted and curated are the words artist and interior designer Teresa Davis uses to describe her aesthetic, as well as the common thread that unites her residential designs. “My motto has always been, ‘It’s the mix, not the match,’ ” she says. Davis’ creative eye and formal training, coupled with “incurable boredom and a need to push myself into uncharted territory in life and art,” have yielded an elegant array of interiors for clients in Davis’ former and current hometowns of Memphis and Denver, plus a portfolio of intriguing multimedia figure studies. Luxe explores them here. post31interiors.com

As an artist, what compelled you to explore the human form? I’ll never forget the first time I attempted to draw the human figure in college, and how completely captivated I was with the idea of recreating movement from this fluid subject.

How does your knowledge of fine art inform your interior design work? My design work has always included pieces from all disciplines: drawing, painting, photography, textiles and pottery. My art influence provides the character, warmth and sparkle that my clients appreciate.

How do you envision your latest artwork fitting into a home’s interiors? My work spans several genres, and you’ll see stylized traditional figures coexisting with unrecognizable deconstructed figures. Both styles partner perfectly with each other in any interior space. Although I prefer working large and love the power a bold piece brings to a room, I also do smaller paper pieces that can be mixed on a gallery wall.

And you love a good mix! My personal style is very much a collected, layered look; a visual conversation about living with things I love and am drawn to. I’ve always been crazy about one-of-a- kind pieces and those crafted by the human hand. I search long and hard for pieces that tell a story, and I am ecstatic when a client provides treasures to be incorporated in a project. It’s incredibly important to me to add this layer of interest to a project, rather than just “decorating” it.

PHOTO COURTESY TERESA DAVIS

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Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure {Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure} – English

Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure {Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure} – English

The post Find Sanctuary In A Colorado Family Compound Built For Outdoor Adventure appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When a Chicago couple with three children decided they wanted a lifestyle change, it set them on an adventure that landed them more than 1,000 miles away in the house of their dreams. “We realized we could live anywhere, as long as it was near an airport,” remembers the husband. “So, we started thinking about where that place would be.” Although they spent hours considering the ideal location, they kept coming back to Colorado, given the happy childhood memories the husband had of camping and skiing with his family in Steamboat Springs. As they researched the perfect town, all signs seemed to point to Boulder, Colorado. “It has everything we want—including access to nature and better weather,” the husband notes.

With their location determined, they set out to build their dream house. “We found a lot in an awesome neighborhood that offers both nature and a great community,” says the husband. “We wanted our kids to spend a ton of time outside, and this neighborhood has great access to trails.”

The next part of the adventure involved building a structure that made the most of the site while allowing the homeowners to live the family life they envisioned. Since they would be managing the project remotely, working with a team they could trust was key. “They were only on the job site a handful of times, and the trust they put in us was extraordinary,” says general contractor Tom Stanko. “Every person there knew the family had a lot of faith in us, and we did our best to give them the house they wanted.”

What that looked like was hard to categorize. The homeowners came to architects Dale Hubbard and Kim Cattau and residential designer Anna Slowey with the idea of a modern farmhouse. “The thing about that term is that it has been used so often, it can mean just about anything,” says Hubbard. “But after talking with the clients, we realized that what they wanted was a family compound on their land—something with deconstructed massing, like a group of buildings you’d find on a traditional farm. We also realized that they wanted ornament that was deliberate, utilitarian and almost industrial in feel.” Slowey notes that the choice of color palette and crisp details advance the concept of a modern farmhouse. “Everything is crisp and beautifully articulated,” she says. “We took the traditional idea of a black and white color palette and modified it a bit, nothing here is a true black—the dark color comes from blackened steel. It gives the house a clean, modern feel.”

The house became a U-shaped structure that, at first glance, resembles a cluster of buildings. In this configuration, one wing is for the bedrooms, the other is a guest suite and in between—or the bottom part of the U—is the public space comprising the entry and a combined great room, kitchen and dining room.

One of the forces that propelled this family from the Midwest to the mountains was a desire for their kids to live outside. With that in mind, Cattau says that the architects designed the house from the “inside out,” making access to the yard and the open spaces beyond priority. “We worked to make the volumes inside feel good, they are comfortable and flow together—it’s an easy space to be in,” she says. “But we also worked to make sure that all those rooms have access or sight lines to the yard and the hills.” In practice, this means that someone could get up from the kitchen table and walk unimpeded through the large sliding doors and into the pool, if they are so inclined. The same goes for the ground-level master suite.

The outdoor space, executed in concert with landscape architect Luke Sanzone, looks like a residential version of a mountain resort. After all, it contains the aforementioned pool, an in-ground spa, a generous lawn and a large fire pit all set against the backdrop of rolling mountains. But this is sophistication for all ages; the boulders surrounding the pool are set in a way that allows kids to climb and, most importantly, leap into the pool. “The home is designed with a series of little landing spots and places to retreat,” says Slowey. “The landscape is no different, it has very intentional destinations to gather. The whole backyard has a very fun feeling.”

It’s a feeling that flows upstairs to the kids’ rooms, which were crafted not only for rest, but for sleepovers with cousins who visit frequently. “We worked in collaboration with designer Megan Hudacky on all the rooms, and we wanted to make the boys’ room feel a bit like a sleepaway camp,” says Slowey. Adds Hubbard, “you could look at the entire project as a sanctuary.”

And after the stress of relocating, a sanctuary was what was called for. “To pack up and move like that was scary,” says the husband. “But it was so much fun to have the vision, and then execute it. Today we walk around in the house we dreamed about, and watch our kids enjoy it as we hoped.” This is one leap of faith that had a happy landing.

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Behind a Denver Designer’s To-The-Trade Collections {Behind a Denver Designer’s To-The-Trade Collections} – English

Behind a Denver Designer’s To-The-Trade Collections {Behind a Denver Designer’s To-The-Trade Collections} – English

The post Behind a Denver Designer’s To-The-Trade Collections appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

angela harris collection

Launch: Angela Harris for Phillips Collection

“My love of design comes from the notion that things are meant to be beautiful, and our intention to find and create such beauty comes through collaboration,” says Angela Harris, founder, CEO and principal of Denver-based design firm Trio. Harris recently partnered with Phillips Collection, a to-the-trade furniture manufacturer known for organic-contemporary furnishings, to create three collections that marry clean lines with artful details: The Ladder collection’s linear chairs, sofas (shown) and tables with metal ladder backs and bases play with negative space. Intersection’s boxy wood coffee tables are inlaid with crisscrossing metal bands. And the Bordo Collection’s channel-tufted-leather sofa and chair seats seem carved into sleek cubes of suar wood.

PHOTO COURTESY PHILLIPS COLLECTION

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McQueens Flowers Brings Those Beautifully Lavish Bouquets To New York City Shop {McQueens Flowers Brings Those Beautifully Lavish Bouquets To New York City Shop} – English

McQueens Flowers Brings Those Beautifully Lavish Bouquets To New York City Shop {McQueens Flowers Brings Those Beautifully Lavish Bouquets To New York City Shop} – English

mcqueens flowers arrangement

London’s McQueens Flowers has headed stateside, opening its first U.S. storefront in New York this spring. The floral powerhouse is best known for creating over-the-top arrangements for the Vanity Fair Oscar Party and the Wimbledon Championship Ball, as well as for London luxury hotels Claridge’s and the Connaught.

Now, not only can New Yorkers access McQueens’ terrariums, orchids and candles in-store and online, but they can also learn to fashion their own lavish bouquets at the accompanying McQueens International Flower School. The new brick-and-mortar will host everything from one-day workshops to vocational professional courses.

PHOTO COURTESY MCQUEENS FLOWERS

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A Lakeside Abode With Edge Welcomes A Young Family {A Lakeside Abode With Edge Welcomes A Young Family} – English

A Lakeside Abode With Edge Welcomes A Young Family {A Lakeside Abode With Edge Welcomes A Young Family} – English

The post A Lakeside Abode With Edge Welcomes A Young Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

We want you to go wild–within reason,” Allison Lind’s clients told her. Such a directive would be music to any designer’s ears, and it certainly was to Lind’s. After deciding to build their dream home on a Lake Tapps, Washington, property they owned, the clients were ready to take chances–and forsake the 1990s vibes, complete with medium-pile carpet and orange-toned wood, in the house. “There was a back and forth with ideas and getting creative but knowing the reality of children,” says Lind. “So we found a happy medium.” Under the designer’s care, the new structure’s stone, velvet and glam accents make it edgy enough for the adults to entertain, yet cozy enough for three young kids to tool around the wood floors on hoverboards.

Architect Steve Dona guided the residents through several iterations of the project, from a renovation to a complete rebuild. In turn, the clients’ familiarity with the property allowed them to give Dona thoughtful feedback. “They noted where the sun rose and set, the views and their privacy concerns,” reports the architect. While he changed the driveway location to create both a better entry sequence and more isolation, the home remained in the same spot. “It was situated to take the best possible advantage of the wonderful lake views,” Dona reports. Those sights are framed by floor-to-ceiling windows and glass doors that open to terraces. Case in point, he oriented the master bedroom to enjoy vistas of the lake and a beautiful tree in the yard–while still providing for privacy from the street and water.

The homeowners brought Lind on at the beginning of the project, so she was able to implement her vision for the interiors all the way through–“from decor to the placement of outlet switches,” she says. Her work encompassed the finishes, and she collaborated closely with general contractor Erik Schelbert. Recalling their creative partnership, she muses, “I’d come up with crazy ideas and say, ‘Can we do this? How?’ ” The home is replete with carefully considered moments. The fireplace in the great room is a statement piece. Black-stained fir paneling surrounds the firebox and bisects a slab of granite, which extends on each side to become a bench. Echoing the bold gesture in the nearby kitchen are dramatic black cabinets. “When the light hits them the right way, it creates a chevron pattern. It’s a beautiful detail,” says Lind. Getting them just right, though, required a heroic effort from the whole team. “We spent countless hours with different options,” says Schelbert. “Everyone had input into the final product.”

A high-contrast palette continues throughout the interior, a critical choice to maintain visual consistency since all the rooms occupy a single floor. Lind anchored the great room with two tufted chesterfield sofas in gray velvet and offset them with a sleek glass and metal coffee table–a chic pairing for entertaining yet durable enough for the children. In the dining area, a table made of reclaimed elm “can take a beating, but that will make it more charming over time,” says the designer. “You don’t want to get too delicate because of the kids, but you want it to feel elegant.” Teak caned-back chairs with black seat cushions are another solution that melds style with practicality. She also carried the bold strokes into the master bathroom where she covered the shower in stripes of black and white tiles. “I loved the drama and the interest,” the designer says of the light and dark interplay. (She even placed the tiles into the floor in front of the vanities for a sort of trompe l’oeil bath mat effect.) Ensuring things aren’t totally austere, though, colorful carpets weave through the house. While an antique rug enlivens the master bedroom, a reproduction made more sense in the high-traffic zone of the great room.

The spaces the team conjured fulfilled the clients wishes. “They wanted something special and unique,” Lind says, adding, “They didn’t want to recreate a Pinterest board.” By allowing Lind substantial latitude, they ensured their house would be a personal, thoughtful statement. “They were both involved in decision-making but gave me so much independence and leeway. I really came up with the full concepts and they approved almost everything. I think they wanted to be surprised.”

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The Florida Waterfront Home Primed For Art Lovers And Outdoor Entertaining {The Florida Waterfront Home Primed For Art Lovers And Outdoor Entertaining} – English

The Florida Waterfront Home Primed For Art Lovers And Outdoor Entertaining {The Florida Waterfront Home Primed For Art Lovers And Outdoor Entertaining} – English

The post The Florida Waterfront Home Primed For Art Lovers And Outdoor Entertaining appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Like a good conversation, a space ideally suited for entertaining should encourage free-flowing, organic interaction. Designer Carolyn McCarthy realized early on that her clients’ Coral Gables residence lacked that key element. Partitioned by too many walls, the abode’s gathering areas were siloed. And despite a prime Coral Gables Waterway location, the home didn’t take full advantage of its picturesque setting. On top of all that, the original design was planted firmly in the 1980s.

What began as a small project evolved into a two-year, top-to-bottom renovation for McCarthy, architect Ryan Alderman, general contractor Jordan Gruber and builder Jason Elmer. Having collaborated with the owners previously, the designer knew how important the social spaces would be. “I had spent the past two years prior working on their children’s houses, so I had a good sense of how they entertained,” she says. “Every weekend, they host probably 20 people for dinner.”

Restructuring the clients’ home to fit their lifestyle meant removing several confining walls and doors as well as liberating obstructed vistas. Gruber and Elmer replaced a dining room wall with glass-enclosed wine storage and substituted the staircase’s thick wood balustrade for stainless steel and glass, facilitating views to the outdoors even from the kitchen. They also knocked down the wall between the family and living areas, creating one expansive space, and removed the latter’s 10-foot-high, 15-foot-long cherry built-in in favor of a fireplace of book-matched marble. “I felt like I needed a strong focal point when you walked in,” McCarthy explains.

Among the most striking aspects of the redesign, the home’s foyer originally featured a sizable dark wood door prefaced by a long porch. Gruber and Elmer brought the entry forward, doubling the dimensions of the foyer, and installed a 12-foot glass pivot front door to capitalize on the natural light. Yet that’s not the greatest expanse of glass they added to the home. The living area’s glass doors span an entire wall’s length, open wide and stack unobtrusively to encourage indoor-outdoor living. Even better? The idyllic waterfront landscape can now be seen from the foyer.

For a family who lives to entertain–and lives in a balmy tropical climate–outdoor space is the holy grail. In the backyard, to enlarge the upper terrace, the team filled in a set of steps that had led to the pool; a barbecue pavilion was added as well. Among the grounds, landscape designer John Farrar complemented the water view with beach creeper, Lignum vitae trees and a grove of Satakentia liukiuensis palms. “We really tried to make sure all the plant material was pretty mature and at a good height so, even from their second-floor windows, the owners had almost fairly immediate privacy,” he says.

In addition to fashioning spaces geared to hosting guests, McCarthy had to take another critical component into account for the redesign: the owners’ ample collection of artworks by Cuban masters. She initially considered hanging the paintings salon-style in the upstairs family room until an art-hanging consultant made a salient point. “He looked at me and asked, ‘Have you ever seen a Monet hanging above a Monet?’ And I said, ‘Point taken,’ ” she laughs. “Because they are different artists and are probably all of equal reputation, we worked on balancing size and scale as well as framing. We reframed only a few pieces, because they were so beautiful on their own.”

Just as imperative was the way each work of art was illuminated. “One of the first things we did with the owners was pinpoint locations for pieces,” Elmer recalls. For certain major walls, he and Gruber installed recessed track lighting with adjustable heads that can be moved and changed depending on the artwork. “A lot of collectors like to cycle through their paintings throughout the years of living in their homes,” Gruber notes.

To ensure the artwork remains the center of attention, McCarthy kept the walls white and decor a quiet palette of cozy grays–no big splashes of color–for a clean, modern look. Yet to prevent the design from being too austere, she incorporated wood–particularly walnut, which appears in places such as the beams lining the living area’s lofty ceiling. “The furnishings were how I really tried to warm it up,” she says. “For example, the living area rug has a lot of soothing tones, and it picked up so nicely on the veining of the marble on the fireplace.” With geometric shapes and neutral hues, the furniture amplifies the renovated architecture as well as the waterfront view.

In the end, McCarthy says, the new open flow and connection to the outdoors are what make the home so inviting. “I really love that modern tropical effect you get when the doors are all open and the breeze is coming through,” she says. “There’s a great romance to it all when you walk in and see the water.”

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Handmade Pieces Serve As Functional Art At Antu-Made{Handmade Pieces Serve As Functional Art At Antu-Made}-English

Handmade Pieces Serve As Functional Art At Antu-Made{Handmade Pieces Serve As Functional Art At Antu-Made}-English

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Meet The Maker

Anna Marks

Anna Marks discovered her passion for furniture design when she couldn’t find a table for a client’s home. “So I made it,” she says matter-of-factly; thus, her boutique furniture atelier Antu-Made was born. But her handmade pieces–including the Claw Sleek table and David’s bench (shown, below), cast in bronze and finished with rich detail–belie the insouciance of her do-it-yourself spirit. “It’s like jewelry,” Marks says. “Each piece is poured by hand and cannot be made without the mastery of the artist.”

Describe your pieces. They’re like functional art. I always think of how well they’re going to work in addition to how good they are going to look.

Tell us about the process. New pieces often arrive out of necessity because I can’t find the perfect one for my client, and I strive for individuality of each piece. I come up with an idea, develop it into something tangible, explore materials and decide what is appropriate, followed by months and months of prototyping before finally completing the first finished piece.

What are you working on next? I have a very busy mind–I constantly dream of furniture. In the very near future I will launch a new collection, including a set of tables that can be used individually or together, side tables and coffee tables. I’m also excited about an interactive, leather-upholstered bench that I’m working on.

PHOTOS: TOP, KATRINA WITTKAMP; BENCH, COURTESY ANNA MARKS

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A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots{A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots}-English

A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots{A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots}-English

The post A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Betsy Nathan has always been a collector. The daughter of a renowned Chicago gallerist, she grew up surrounded by an eclectic mix of fine and folk art and objects curated from around the world. After a stint in Beijing in the 1990s, where she studied Chinese craftsmanship, she returned to Chicago to open her first showroom, Pagoda Red, in 1997. Last year she moved into a vastly larger warehouse space in Bucktown, where her entire 4,000-piece collection of global fine arts and antiques is now available for designers and the public alike to browse. While there are many treasures to be discovered at Pagoda Red, we called on Nathan to share a few of her other favorite spots for sourcing goods around the city.

A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots

ROBIN RICHMAN BUCKTOWN

Robin is amazing at creating interesting juxtapositions between clothes, jewelry and accessories. I go here to buy Mad et Len Lava Rocks, which are infused with perfume. They release an earthy spirit when you burn them, and I like to use them in the powder room.”

A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots

LE LABO WICKER PARK

“In China, I had an otherworldly experience when a friend introduced me to traditional incense–the kind that oozes from trees. It’s impossible to find locally, but it turned me on to rich, gentle, moody fragrances and beautiful incense burners to disperse them. I recently purchased Le Labo‘s amulet (a portable diffuser) as a gift for a friend. It becomes very personal when you infuse the stone within with a hand-blended fragrance specially made for the person you are giving it to.”

A Chicago Shop Owner Shares Her Go-To Sourcing Spots

ASRAI GARDEN WICKER PARK

“Pagoda Red and Asrai Garden opened around the same time. We grew up together, so the designers understand our objects and containers. They know how to marry nature’s shapes and colors in fresh, modern ways. They use flowers and greens to frame, rather than overpower, a select object.”

INTERIOR DEFINE LINCOLN PARK

“If you don’t want to wait months for a sofa, Interior Define is a great choice. They feel custom, the process is easy and the price can’t be beat. I’m working with a client now who wants her place finished fast, so we just ordered the Sloan Sectional in a plush onyx fabric.”

PHOTOS: ROBIN RICHMAN, ROBIN RICHMAN; LE LABO, COURTESY LE LABO; ASRAI GARDEN, LUCY HEWETT; INTERIOR DEFINE, CAROLINA MARIANA RODRIGUEZ.

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Bold Colors Meet Sedate Sensibilities In A Swoony Collab {Bold Colors Meet Sedate Sensibilities In A Swoony Collab} – English

Bold Colors Meet Sedate Sensibilities In A Swoony Collab {Bold Colors Meet Sedate Sensibilities In A Swoony Collab} – English

The post Bold Colors Meet Sedate Sensibilities In A Swoony Collab appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Charlotte-based interior designer and blogger Holly Hollingsworth Phillips is nationally renowned for her colorful, globally inspired brand, The English Room. When she teamed up with Atlanta-based Beth Lacefield, of textile and soft goods manufacturer Lacefield Designs, she added the weight of Lacefield’s 23 years of industry know-how to her first collection.

The two merged Phillips’ wild color sense with Lacefield’s more sedate sensibilities. “We were totally simpatico,” says Phillips, who contributed photos from her travels to maximalist motifs with traditional twists.

Manufactured stateside with references to India, Morocco, Italy and England, the patterns encompass Windsor and Bloomsbury–two whimsical, high-impact florals born of British traditions–Mamounia, a painterly geometric alluding to one of Marrakech’s most iconic hotels, as well as Agra and Delhi, paisley and floral block prints inspired by indigenous crafts of the subcontinent.

The rollout launched with 15 by-the-yard textiles and seven throw pillows. Next up, says Phillips: a second line of fabrics and, with luck, wallpapers.


PHOTOS: VIGNETTE, DUSTIN PECK; PILLOWS, BRIAN BIEDER.

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