Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room {Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room} – English

Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room {Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room} – English

The post Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Tasting room with slatted-wood ceiling and banquette seating upholstered in a light-colored fabric.

In Paso Robles wine country, amidst the hills and vines of Booker Vineyard’s 100-acre property, is a new tasting venue with a lounge-y vibe that invites guests to gather with friends, settle in and make themselves at home.

Signum Architecture’s minimalist design honors the California winery’s natural surroundings, matching the sensibilities of owner and vintner Eric Jensen, whose respect for the land is central to his winemaking approach. The fracture patterns of the area’s limestone soil, for example, were used as the basis for the layout of the structure’s long walls. The restrained material palette includes cedar, board-formed concrete and natural steel, which architect Juancarlos Fernandez says “will rust over time, just like the stakes at the end of each vine row.”

The architecture is complemented by understated interiors by Katie Martinez Design, whose warm, light color palette was also inspired by the limestone soil. Tactile surfaces abound— from raked limestone bathroom tile and bleached walnut and white oak cabinetry to cedar siding and beams and burnished brass at the bar front.

The new spaces set the stage for various experiences at the winery, from a VIP limestone cave tasting with the owner’s personal library of wines, to an afternoon of “Bocce and Bottles” on a private outdoor lounge area.

PHOTO COURTESY ADAM ROUSE PHOTOGRAPHY

The post Sip Wine In Style At This Chic Paso Robles Tasting Room appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home {Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home} – English

The post Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

There’s something almost primordially comforting about living in the mountains. In the quiet seclusion of the surrounding landscape, time seems to slow down so one can truly savor moments of laughter and joy, swapping stories by the fire. This is what Craig and Mariah Morris craved most for their Aspen home. Though they love the contemporary structure—with its bright, voluminous rooms and expansive windows that perfectly capture views of the awe-inspiring mountainside—they also craved something more intimate and cozier. They turned to designers Joe McGuire and Matthew Tenzin to cultivate close-knit gathering spaces perfect for cocktail hours and family dinners.

Originally built in 1977, the mountain abode was renovated in 2019 by the previous owner into its sleek statement of glass and sunlight, made in consultation with architect Scot Broughton. In their work, McGuire and Tenzin especially delight in making such grand contemporary structures feel welcoming and human-centric. “People seem to be drawn to us to create cozy interiors in these types of spaces,” notes McGuire. “We balance the architecture and complement it, so it doesn’t feel cold and stark.”

The home already provided an inspiring canvas for the designers to explore, and they found able partners in general contractors Thaddeus Eshelman and Jimmy Terui, who also oversaw the 2019 renovation. Collaborating on the new customizations with McGuire and Tenzin “was the bow on the present,” notes Terui. “All of their final touches really put it over the top.” Together, they focused on incorporating new finishes that would add more visual weight to the interior’s broad white walls and pale oak flooring. The abode featured black metal-framed windows and ceiling box beams that cut through the light and airy spaces, and the designers emphasized this juxtaposition by adding a few bolder finishes, such as staining the kitchen cabinetry in a deep ebony hue. The rich color “gives some structure and energy to the space, so it’s not just neutrals,” Tenzin explains.

To temper the angularity of the architecture, the designers introduced some curved elements to the interiors. “Right now, we have this desire for softer lines, yet still done in a very contemporary way,” says Tenzin. This was the guiding principle behind selecting the new furnishings and accents: all are unequivocally modern in silhouette, but never too sharp or sleek. Chairs and sofas have rounded backs and arms softened with tactile materials like shearling, wool and saddle leather. Mixing abstract designs with traditional Moroccan weaves, “the rugs are also really special, as they add a lot of comfort and interest,” says McGuire. The couple’s bedroom in particular is a study in tactile layering, with an upholstered bed frame, a fabric-paneled wall and artful Apparatus sconces featuring wefts of horsehair. “Textures were a key part of adding in that warmth to the home,” notes Tenzin about their overall approach.

The designers also kept everything within an organic palette borrowed from the surrounding mountain woodland to create cohesion. “Golden tones from the aspens, amber tones from the scrub oaks and greens from the evergreens all filter in through the house,” notes Tenzin. And in the couple’s serene main bedroom “there’s a little bit of a lavender hue that relates to the lavender and sage that grow so beautifully here in Colorado.” Artwork introduces more personal and playful notes of color, like the specially commissioned comic book-inspired piece by artist Nelson De La Nuez, which serves as a touching reference to the couple’s love story.

A self-confessed lighting fanatic, Tenzin was particularly passionate about how they would illuminate the home. Style wise, materials ranged from minimalist black metal to delicate amber glass globes. But “it was also really important for us to find LED fixtures that get warm as you dim them,” he explains. “It’s so critical for creating the right vibe.” These technical details are very much like “the difference between gray, cool lighting, which makes everybody look like a ghost, and that beautiful candlelit feel where everyone looks glamorous,” adds McGuire.

Nestled in this soft glow and laden with lush textures, the dwelling now feels more approachable. And for the designers, there’s nothing better than infusing soulfulness into such shiny, modern spaces. As McGuire says, “When you can walk in and see the family truly relaxing in their own home, that’s a feeling of success for us.”

The post Behind The Cozy Makeover Of This Modern Mountain Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home {Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home} – English

Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home {Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home} – English

The post Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When it comes to her list of wants, Gale Singer, founder and president of Circa Lighting, does not waver. She is as discerning about crown molding (pass), vibrant art (irresistible) and window treatments (no, thank you) as she is about pendants, sconces and chandeliers. After about 15 years of pondering, her agenda for her own Savannah home pinpointed everything from a high-functioning kitchen with great traffic flow to pocket glass doors that open to reveal a saltwater pool and sculpted greenery. Once she found a lot she loved in an eclectic, tucked-away neighborhood not far from the Vernon River, all those years of dreaming finally came to fruition.

By the time she turned over her inspiration folder to Rudolph Colby—the residential designer behind more than a decade’s worth of Circa Lighting stores—Gale felt confident he was the person to bring her vision to life. “Rudy is an artist,” she says of Colby, who, working with general contractor Josh Brooks, also orchestrated the home’s landscaping and pool. “He has a wonderful sense of style, detail and proportion. His designs are classic and timeless.”

Gale is a hands-on client. “The most fun we have, ever, is when we sit down together, spread out a piece of paper and each pick up a pencil,” Colby says of their tactile process. Having initially conceived of an on-site renovation that ultimately had to be scrapped due to water damage beneath the property’s existing house, the residential designer’s “take two,” as he calls it, followed the original home’s layout quite closely. What transpired was a practice in extreme simplification, subtracting everything extra. “Any time there was a line or shadow that could be removed from a window or door or piece of hardware, she would nix it,” Colby says of his client, who dictated the project’s concealed door hinges and nearly invisible reveals.

“There’s nothing trendy about it,” Gale adds of the residence, which cleverly combines modern-leaning and ranch-inspired influences behind a façade of slender white Norman brick and horizontal board-and-batten siding. Though her linear, tightly landscaped home might diverge from the typical Lowcountry vernacular, it’s connected to the fabric of the city in a manner very personal to its owner: fine art. “I’m lucky to live in a place with such close access to the Savannah College of Art & Design and all the wonderful artists that have come out of that university,” says Gale, an ardent collector.

Her expansive art assortment comes to life thanks to sizable skylights—Colby’s solution for illuminating the east-west-oriented house from the inside out. “You get direct sun at different times of the year, and it’s really quite fabulous,” Colby reveals. As a lover of natural light, Gale eschewed window treatments in most rooms, adding extra layers by way of Circa Lighting fixtures. However, her selections were not chosen for dramatic impact, rather for subtlety. Most had remained stalwarts on her personal wish list for years—particularly a pair of Thomas O’Brien-authored pendants named in her honor, which today suspend over her kitchen island.

To ensure interiors that would incorporate all of these items masterfully, the discriminating homeowner looked to Michael Del Piero, a designer whom Gale praises for her “neutral palettes, and ability to layer textures and to curate objects.” Del Piero, who had previously designed Gale’s Chicago loft, has long felt a sense of aesthetic alignment with her client. “What Gale wanted is what my firm is known for: livable, approachable and interesting interiors with nothing too precious or fussy,” she notes.

Decorating decisions between the two were uncommonly swift, with most made on a single trip to High Point Market. “For three days, in the pouring rain, we literally furnished the entire house, inside and out,” Del Piero recalls. Together, the pair selected deep sofas with simple lines, intriguing Louise Nevelson-esque nightstands, even an oak dining table to sub as an oversize desk in the grass cloth-clad home office. “Gale is super no-frills; she wants the best but she wants it simple,” says Del Piero, who finished off spaces with antique rugs to warm up the sleek wood and stone floors.

In sum, the lighting maven’s Savannah home demonstrates her strong understanding not only of design, but of herself. No space is wasted, and every element is optimized for the way she wants to live. “She has a really sharp eye,” Colby concludes. “There’s a place for everything and everything has meaning. And I think there’s a strong reason for that: Gale sees things differently.” Certainly, in the case of curating her own home, she’s seen the light.

The post Be Awed By The Artful Brilliance Of A Lighting Leader’s Savannah Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography {New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography} – English

New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography {New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography} – English

The post New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Livden tile pink backsplash

Livden’s statement-making tile packs a vivid punch.

Half-sisters Hilary Gibbs and Georgie Smith share a familial love of tile: Gibbs’s mother, Melinda Earl, founded Stone Impressions, where both women still play a role. But the duo’s new side venture, Livden, focuses on their own original decorative tiles made with recycled and post-consumer materials. “When I told my mother I’d been experimenting with my own designs, she immediately handed me her tool kit of art supplies and gave me her best design tips,” recalls Gibbs.

Taking their cues from Southern California’s geographic diversity and rich architectural history, the sisters have produced innovative geometric designs, available in a palette of earthy hues. “We’re inspired by color’s ability to evoke certain feelings,” adds Smith, noting a meditative red and their desert-inspired collection, Painted Sands, that debuted in July. “Our designs mirror the California lifestyle, from laid-back and sunny to bohemian and modern,” adds Gibbs. “They’re playful statement-makers that can give any space a punch of personality.”

Livden tile red and pink arcs

An example of Livden’s new desert-inspired collection, Painted Sands.

Livden tile blue white purple orange geometric

Another example from Livden’s new desert-inspired collection, Painted Sands.

PHOTOS COURTESY LIVDEN

The post New Tile Company Livden Takes Its Cues From SoCal’s Geography appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle {These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle} – English

These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle {These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle} – English

The post These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

adaptive couches and table from resource furniture

Resource Furniture is designed to be adaptive and multi-functional.

This fall, renowned European-made furniture company Resource Furniture opens its first Northwest showroom inside the newly renovated Seattle Design Center in the industrial-hip Georgetown neighborhood. The company’s slick collection of transforming and multifunctional furniture—from luxury Italian wall beds to bookshelves with built-in telescoping tabletops and an array of storage systems and seating options—insists that design-forward furniture can have cutting-edge technology and functionality without sacrificing style. The Seattle locale will feature a mix of new and classic Resource Furniture pieces that help tease out multiple uses from compact spaces. A champion for small- space living, Resource Furniture has supported the research and development of ADU and prefab homes throughout North America.

“As one of the leading cities for micro-housing developments, Seattle was a natural fit for Resource Furniture’s expansion,” says co-founder Ron Barth. Challie Stillman, Resource Furniture’s Head of Sales & Design, agrees. “We attract the design-obsessed, innovation- seekers and out-of-the-box thinkers. We’re proud to bring our unique philosophy to Seattle, where we know we’ll be surrounded by a community of like-minded design enthusiasts.”

adaptive couches and table from resource furniture

Tables and chairs neatly fit together in multiple, space-saving ways.

PHOTOS COURTESY RESOURCE FURNITURE

The post These Innovative, Design-Forward Pieces Have A New Home In Seattle appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting {Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting} – English

Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting {Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting} – English

The post Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

textile artist Maggie Dillon

Take everything you know about your grandmother’s quilt and elevate it. Bridging the past with the present, Sarasota textile artist Maggie Dillon translates vintage images, family photos and her own photography into quilted pieces of fine art. The award-winning textile portrait artist captures candid moments, evoking a feeling of nostalgic happiness but also loss of something deeply important and soulful.

What prompted you to work with fiber?

My freshman year at Flagler College in historic St. Augustine, I started working at a local quilt shop near campus. I began experimenting with fabric as a medium after being a traditional quilter for about a decade. Encouraged by my drawing professor, I created my first fiber portrait made of collaged commercial fabrics. Since 2008, I have worked exclusively in fabric and textiles. Increasingly, more galleries and venues are accepting mixed media/fiber, but it is still an uncommon medium.

How do you source and select the vintage photos you use?

While pursuing a fine art degree, I focused on photojournalism. I enjoyed that the photos captured what was happening in the moment, rather than an awareness of the camera. A friend found some amazing vintage images in a thrift shop. I pulled inspiration from a few of those and entered some exhibitions, and from there I was hooked. My favorite images are the ones that feel the most authentic and nostalgic. Many are sourced from original family photos, while others are pieced together with different elements of images before creating the pattern.

Why do these textile art pieces make an impact?

Quilting and textile work have a broad view of being “grandma’s quilts” and a strictly utilitarian item. I believe my work, among others, is breaking those boundaries and elevating the medium to fine art. It draws the viewer in, looking closely at the built-up fabric layers, stitching and textures.

PHOTOS: COURTESY MAGGIE DILLON

The post Meet The Naples Artist Bringing Fine Art To Quilting appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves {Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves} – English

Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves {Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves} – English

The post Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Santa Fe Modern book cover

As any desert dweller knows, the landscape’s saturated sunsets and botanical austerity create an ideal backdrop for a variety of architectural styles. In Santa Fe, architects have responded with designs that are rooted in tradition yet also forward thinking in execution. The result is an architectural authenticity captured in Santa Fe Modern: Contemporary Design in the High Desert. Authored by Helen Thompson with photographs by Casey Dunn, the book features 20 distinctive residences that highlight Santa Fe’s emerging modernist design. “Santa Fe Modern comes out at a time when it has never been more urgent to think about how we are at home in the world,” Thompson says. “Modern houses in Santa Fe seem as if they belong in the dramatic desert landscape, and that sense of belonging is the real reason modernism works so well there.”

PHOTO COURTESY MONACELLI

The post Lovers Of Modernism Should Add This New Book To Their Shelves appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection {Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection} – English

Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection {Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection} – English

The post Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A living room setting with blue and coral patterned pillows, blue wallpaper and coral lamp

Delray Beach artist Junior Sandler splashes canvases with vibrant color and captures the energy of South Florida’s tropical lifestyle. Along with showcasing her work at galleries in Palm Beach and beyond, Sandler recently collaborated on her first design project with interior designer Lauren Haskell. Luxe catches up with Sandler. shoplohome.com

How did you get your start? I was exposed to art early on and experimented with many mediums, such as charcoal, ceramics and oil. Formal training is wonderful for technique, but the opportunity to explore with an easel, still life or live models allowed me to trust my vision and expression. I started donating works to my favorite charities some years ago. The feedback was so positive that it pushed me to take a professional view of my production.

What do you want your works to evoke? My designs are based in natural patterns, and that feeling of lightness and tranquility is what I hope shines through. I aim for a contemporary take on traditional, so there is a simplicity in the images yet they’re still provocative. Color is a must.

Take us behind the scenes of your latest collaboration with Lauren Haskell. We followed one another on Instagram, and she reached out saying she saw something special in my work. Lauren hand-selected the paintings, which became beautiful fabrics, wallpapers, pillows and pottery, including ginger jars. I thought of myself as a painter, but she has encouraged me to see myself as a designer as well.

PHOTO COURTESY LAUREN HASKELL

The post Channel Palm Beach With This Playful, Punchy Collection appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles {Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles} – English

Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles {Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles} – English

The post Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

POST MASTER: @cctextiles

WHO: Textile designer, artist, entrepreneur and mother (to both a golden-haired boy and a fluffy Pomeranian), Caroline Cecil.

WHAT: An artful blend of coolly composed interiors, smiling friends and family and, of course, tantalizing close-ups of the fabrics and wallpapers that begin as Cecil’s own artworks.

WHY: Each post pulls back the curtain on a graceful sort of lifestyle where roses bloom outside white houses, Roman shades let in just enough Arizona sunshine, and small-batch textiles and papers make the case that less is more when it comes to patterns. This instinct toward restraint means you can spend a good deal of time clicking through the feed, looking for the story behind each collection of heritage linens and hand-printed papers. (Or just the next shot of Caroline’s little boy scaling the couch!)

IN HER WORDS: “For us, Instagram is all about connecting with our community and sharing a behind-the-scenes look inside our Phoenix studio. From painting to measuring fabric yardages to pulling sample shipments to our studio Pomeranian, Taos, we hope to inspire our community to be more creative.”

PHOTOS COURTESY CAROLINE CECIL TEXTILES

The post Take A Behind The Scenes Look At The Creation Of These Textiles appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past {Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past} – English

Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past {Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past} – English

The post Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A century ago, Elizabeth Lauder Kellum, niece of industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, and her fishing-guide husband, Med Kellum, built a magnificent estate off McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Set on 457 acres along what’s now known as Whiskey Creek, the property comprised a handsome mansion, a boathouse, a staff home, stables and more—everything a 1920s high-society couple would need to winter in Southwest Florida. America was in the early days of Prohibition, but that hardly mattered: The Kellums distilled whiskey in a log cabin on the property and transported some of it off the estate by boat, thus giving the creek its name. Their few years at Wyomee Hatchee Farms—a name derived from the native Seminoles’ words for “whiskey” and “river”—were marked, too, by visits from such innovators as Thomas Edison (who, rumor has it, had a hand in designing the home) and Henry Ford.

Over the next decades, the estate was divvied up into smaller parcels and sold, but the main residence remained, almost just as it was built, until its current owners set foot on the property. “It was on and off the market multiple times, and for about four years, we made offers on it,” the wife recalls. “My biggest concern was that someone would buy it and just tear it down.” But the couple prevailed and undertook the work of restoring the house to its former aesthetic glory while updating it for life in the 21st century.

Interior designer Renée Gaddis led the effort—and she had a lot of beautiful elements to work with: original windows and heart-of-pine floors, detailed molding and millwork, Shaker-style doors with brass hardware, and push-button electrical switches with pearl inlays. From the beginning, Gaddis knew how her plans would play out. “I think a lot of people couldn’t see through the home’s age and wear; it might have looked daunting and overwhelming,” she says. “But the house itself inspired me. It led me to the design very easily, and I saw clearly what we had to do, which was take the house back to its original grandeur.”

Gaddis began by preserving the structure’s layout, with help from general contractor Joe Gatewood. “The home was an absolute time capsule when we first saw it,” he recalls. They removed a living area fireplace that blocked views of the water from the main entrance; its second- story counterpart came out, too, leaving additional space for the main bathroom (and even with these changes, the house still retains six original fireplaces). Gaddis had the floors refinished and integrated the century-old molding into new baseboards. Rusted-out door hardware was replaced with replicas—“The mechanisms were so bad, we kept getting locked in rooms,” the designer says. And the old windows and exterior doors— which, Gatewood points out, endured a century of storms—had to go too in favor of hurricane- code-compliant versions.

In this updated shell, Gaddis layered in luxurious fixtures and finishes, sumptuously upholstered furnishings and beautifully crafted art pieces. In the living area, she staged “a perfect combination of modern interiors in a historic home,” the wife says. There, glam chandeliers pair with a sleek white marble coffee table and clean-lined sofas. The family room, too, sets a rich tone with detailed wall paneling and built- ins painted gray and two plush velvet sectionals. Striking contemporary fixtures make statements throughout the residence, overseeing more classical furnishings in a fabulous presentation of old meets new.

As the design came together, the house had some secrets to reveal. The team found an old potbelly stove Gaddis transformed into a wood-burning pizza oven, a decision that led her to reimagine the kitchen as a 1920s French bistro with open glass shelves and brass fixtures. More demo uncovered a safe hidden in a wall in the owners’ bedroom. Sadly, it didn’t contain any Carnegie cash.

But the home does contain more than a modicum of priceless history, which is now preserved for a long time to come. “We all felt like this was the project of a lifetime,” Gatewood says. The new owners agree. “This isn’t just a home for our family,” the wife says. “It’s a piece of Fort Myers history that will outlast us all.”

The post Tour A Renovated Fort Myers Home Inspired By Its Carnegie Past appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.