Inside A Classic Palm Beach Home That Masters Casual Elegance {Inside A Classic Palm Beach Home That Masters Casual Elegance} – English

Inside A Classic Palm Beach Home That Masters Casual Elegance {Inside A Classic Palm Beach Home That Masters Casual Elegance} – English

The post Inside A Classic Palm Beach Home That Masters Casual Elegance appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“When you’re doing a project, the house tells you what to do,” Rollins says. In this case, the townhome’s classic lines, well-proportioned rooms and easy flow called for “barefoot elegance,” she adds. “There’s a formality to it, but it’s a relaxed formality.” Tom offered a particularly descriptive take: “I suggested the style be somewhere between Peter O’Toole and Ernest Hemingway—a British Colonial feel,” he says. So, Rollins conceptualized a design that blends color with subtle patterns for a calm and sophisticated style.

The couple first got to work honing the highly polished marble floors, replacing pocket doors with a more classic design and relocating the pillars that dominated the dining room to just outside the main entrance for a grander welcome. The modest kitchen was upgraded with a pantry and hidden storage to maximize every inch. “Some people come with baggage; I come with china, silver, crystal and linen,” Rollins quips. Overflow mementos are displayed in the dining room’s massive antique breakfront, a sentimental item from her previous Atlanta home. “I need to have a little bit of my past with me—a few pieces I know,” the interior designer says. “It’s a sense of comfort.”

More work occurred in the television room, an angled space outfitted with built-ins. “We cut the millwork and moved it back, changing the whole look of the room to be half-octagonal,” Tom explains. They installed a cozy banquette, repurposed their former dining table into a coffee table and painted the room a moody shade of navy. “I always say: Paint the smallest room in your house the darkest color you can stand,” Rollins shares. “It visually expands the space.”

Throughout the home, gracious windows welcome radiant outdoor hues and natural light. To counter the vibrancy, Rollins embraced calm interior tones of chocolate brown, white and pale blue, with touches of black, beige and coral. “That restful palette gave me the chance to let pieces with a lot of heft pop,” she says. Inspired by the enormous mahogany front doors, for instance, the interior designer selected furnishings of the same wood, including the living area’s modern coffee table and antique English consoles. Her Queen Anne-style mirrors and lacquered Ming-style tables, meanwhile, play with the contemporary- leaning seating Tom selected. “This was the perfect way to take antique pieces and make them fit with a more modern feel,” Rollins says. The deep white skirted sofa and upholstered slipper chairs mirror guests at a dinner party—“You need a mix of skirt and legs,” she muses—while the chairs’ block print and a sisal rug nod to a Bahamian feel.

The duo settled on subdued off-white walls for the main bedroom upstairs, home to a grass- cloth bed with a nailhead detail and vintage night tables. “She’s gotten me to move off of the monotones to a more colorful palette, and I think I’ve gotten her to somewhere a little more centered,” Tom says, making the interior designer laugh. “It’s a good balance.”

Outside, Rollins added a new portico to the front exterior, installed a fountain across from the front door and planted new greenery, including blooming white tropical flowers, star jasmine vines and green island ficus hedges. “When you live in Florida, your exterior is as important as your interior,” she says. The rear courtyard offers even more space to entertain, including oversize settees the interior designer arranged around the pool and a breezy cabana for alfresco dining.

Simultaneously traditional and easygoing, the townhome is an amalgamation of the couple. It’s become a sentimental spot as well: In the courtyard during their New Year’s Eve party, Tom surprised Rollins with a marriage proposal. “I think the test of a house is that the more you’re in it, the more you like it—and we both feel that,” she says. “It’s home for us now.”

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Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom {Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom} – English

Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom {Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom} – English

The post Custom Cabinetry Meets Antiques At This Holistic Denver Showroom appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

beige mirror and sofa against grey wall displayed in furnishings showroom

PHOTO COURTESY COEUR CABINET + CURATED INTERIORS

As director of interiors for Denver-based Ruggles Mabe Studio, designer Emily Lindemann takes a holistic approach to her work, marrying architectural details and luxurious finishes to create rooms with timeless style. “Giving clients an integrated experience has always been important to us, and we wanted to expand that,” she says. So, when the opportunity arose to create a tactile showroom experience, she embraced it. Called Coeur after the French word for “heart,” the Washington Park studio offers fine custom and semi-custom cabinetry, interior design services, and a selection of new and found home furnishings and accessories. coeurinteriors.com

What’s Coeur’s niche in the Denver design market? We’ve seen a surge in requests for smaller renovations, and Coeur focuses on that scale of project. If a client just wants to redo their powder room, we can help.

Why is cabinetry such an integral part of your offerings? I think it’s absolutely essential to have good cabinetry in your home. It’s something you touch every single day and always a big line item in the budget, so it’s crucial to get it right. That’s why we wanted to partner with Plato Woodwork—they get it.

What are the possibilities for custom cabinetry? Plato is really innovative with their materials, and while they offer classic, solid-wood cabinetry, they’re always pushing the envelope with everything from beautiful textured woods to doors inlaid with brass.

Can you describe the other home goods Coeur offers? We’ve curated antiques, new furnishings, a custom upholstery collection, and we’ve brought in lighting, candle and apothecary lines. I look for pieces that tell a story. Everything is very warm, textural and organic.

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The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era {The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era} – English

The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era {The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era} – English

The post The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When general contractor Mark Kelley first saw the Woodside, California, dwelling that once belonged to Arjay Miller, former Ford Motor Co. president and retired dean of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, he knew it was something very special. “It was a classic, midcentury, one-story house with tall ceilings and huge windows looking out onto a beautiful backyard,” Kelley says. “The home was really well built, and it was filled with furniture from the 1960s that people today would lose their heads over.”

Upon his death in 2017—at the age of 101—Arjay bequeathed the abode to his son and daughter- in-law, for whom Kelley, architect Steve Simpson, interior designer Linda Sullivan and landscape architect Bob Cleaver dreamed up a renovation honoring the home’s historical style while modernizing it for 21st-century life. “In essence, we tried to make everything better without making anything worse,” Simpson says of the challenge.

It’s another way of saying that central to the renovation was a profound sense of restraint. To that end, the architect reallocated space without changing the structure’s footprint: A couple of bedrooms became a home theater, the area for the kitchen expanded, a wine room was added, and two spaces transformed into the new main bedroom suite. Other elements were carefully preserved. The team left Arjay’s office, clad in walnut paneling, as it has always been, and the original front door received only a small upgrade of fluted glass, for the sake of privacy. Much of the hardware is also original to the abode, just powder coated in a darker finish for a fresh look.

Sullivan and her colleague, design director Silvia Hendrawan, took cues from the home itself as the pair decided how to revamp the interiors. “Arjay’s wife, Frances, was a designer and her taste was obviously fantastic,” Sullivan says. “For us, taking a different viewpoint on the interiors while still achieving the original vibe was really important.” This approach led them to select walnut flooring, millwork and cabinetry—unifying old and new installations throughout—to uphold the original style. They also opted for elevated, natural materials such as marble and fabrics in wool, cotton, mohair and silk to continue the residence’s timeless appeal.

Perhaps the most significant source of inspiration in the dwelling is the grand living room, which Simpson describes as “the kind of room you don’t find often in houses anymore.” It’s a large space with tall ceilings and abundant windows that look out on massive, old oak trees. “The original architect, Willard Doane Rand Jr., really captured California living, that indoor-outdoor feeling that we all like,” Simpson says. Here, Sullivan and Hendrawan riffed on the original design with punches of color in yellow, blue and purple. They replaced the fireplace surround with a limestone version and topped it with an antique mirror that bounces the light around the room. Smaller gathering areas allow for easy circulation and plenty of space for entertaining. “I love how the room feels like the existing home with an updated, modern twist,” Sullivan says.

Of course, some spaces were completely transformed—most notably, the kitchen. The design team opened the space to boost the room’s functionality and made aesthetic changes along the way. Plain-sliced walnut cabinetry by Henrybuilt offers a handsome counterpoint to the marble countertops and waterfall island. The blackened-steel custom hood now serves as a subtle focal point, and a trio of small over- island light fixtures helps illuminate the space without blocking the views to the backyard.

The new main bedroom is also an entirely fresh space. Sullivan incorporated a few nods to midcentury design—a custom, channel-tufted headboard and a bubble-like chandelier—while creating a sophisticated, serene vibe. Textural elements, including a mohair chaise lounge, leather benches and wood side tables, give the tonal room an elegant aesthetic that aligns with the home’s overall style.

The renovation was a kind of history lesson— both about Arjay Miller, whose brilliance in the business world and personal vivacity were well documented, and about the value of paying attention to the past. “Maybe if Arjay hadn’t had a vision for passing this home to his family, someone else might have missed all the beauty that was here already,” Simpson says. “But we respected the heritage of the property and the patriarch of the family, and we came out with something great.”

The post The Midcentury Home Of A Former Ford President Enters A New Era appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Inside A Reimagined Florida Home With Bold Blues And Island Charm {Inside A Reimagined Florida Home With Bold Blues And Island Charm} – English

Inside A Reimagined Florida Home With Bold Blues And Island Charm {Inside A Reimagined Florida Home With Bold Blues And Island Charm} – English

The post Inside A Reimagined Florida Home With Bold Blues And Island Charm appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

For nearly 30 years, designer Megan Winters and her family gathered at her parents’ seasonal home in Bonita Springs, Florida, for holidays and other memorable occasions. “Everyone in the family loved the house,” she recalls. “It was such a bright, beautiful setup, and the way my mom decorated it was spectacular. It was impossible to not be happy in this house.”

As time passed, however, the residence became too difficult for Winters’ parents to maintain, and so they downsized to a nearby condominium. That’s when the house keys passed to their oldest daughter, who endearingly followed in her mother’s footsteps to make the dwelling a joyful site for wonderful memories. “I wanted it to be more casual but still very sophisticated and comfortable,” Winters says. “There’s good energy here.”

When the designer and her husband acquired the 1990s residence, it had remained largely untouched since her parents had purchased it nearly three decades ago. She saw opportunities to reinvigorate its character, reconfigure spaces and present a chic twist on its buoyant spirit. Teaming up with general contractor Drew Hemmer, Winters repainted the pink façade a crisp white and swapped out the green shutters for a sky blue Bahama style that exudes instant island charm. Hemmer replaced all the windows with hurricane-impact glass and squared off the half-round windows above the doors for a more contemporary look.

Inside, “Megan wanted to expand the kitchen and family room out through the lanai, which was an extensive part of the project,” the general contractor says. “So it made this large great room they never had before and gave it a more modern, open feel.” To create the space, he blew out the wall separating the family room from the screened-in lanai, enclosing the expanded area with windows that bring in views of the surrounding water and golf course. “It made the whole house brighter,” Winters says.

The interior renovation connects the family area to the now-open kitchen, which doubled in size. There, Winters painted the walls a sentimental bright blue. “It was the exact color my mother had when it was her residence,” she says, “and it makes me feel so happy.” This hue served as a jumping-off point for the rest of the house: Embracing a Floridian quality, the designer touched nearly every room with a vibrant shade of blue, including the kitchen’s cabinetry and lighting pendants as well as the patterned rugs and artwork in the more neutral- toned sitting and dining areas.

New European white oak flooring, jute rugs and wicker furnishings—including the kitchen’s counter stools—are a warm contrast to the clean- lined pieces Winters incorporated, such as the sitting area’s metal-armed lounge chairs and the dining area’s rectangular high-gloss table. And in another mix-and-match move, just like her mother did before her, the designer audaciously blends patterns in each space. “It’s the best way to bring a room together with interest,” she says. “Pattern adds the extra element that makes all designs personal.” Dining chairs in a painterly fabric rest on a checkerboard rug, while a swirling blue zebra print defines a hallway alcove. In a guest bedroom, a modern toile repeats on the wallcovering, bedding and armchairs.

Still, Winters smartly offers a break from the bold prints and bright blues with more serene moments. Her classic use of black and white dominates the dining and sitting areas, welcoming guests from the foyer and leading the eye toward the pool. “Every color can complement this pairing—it’s the best ‘neutral’ I know,” she observes. The color combo also shows up in the main bathroom’s soaking tub, marble flooring and leopard-print wallpaper. And it pairs with navy in the main bedroom, a striped haven decorated with grayscale photos of horses, a passion for the designer, who is also an equestrian.

Living on in the hands of the next generation, the residence has transformed entirely without losing its legacy as a cherished memory box. “In some respects, the home is not much different from what it was,” Hemmer says, “and yet it’s still night and day.” Perhaps the greatest testament of its respectful refresh came from Winters’ parents, who visit every Sunday for dinner. “My father told me I brought this beautiful old home back to life,” the designer says. “This home is the lighthearted, casual and happy version of me.”

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Celebrate The Roaring ’20s At This New York Art Deco Distillery {Celebrate The Roaring ’20s At This New York Art Deco Distillery} – English

Celebrate The Roaring ’20s At This New York Art Deco Distillery {Celebrate The Roaring ’20s At This New York Art Deco Distillery} – English

The post Celebrate The Roaring ’20s At This New York Art Deco Distillery appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

bar in distillery interior

With a nod to Prohibition-era speakeasies, Great Jones Distilling Co. has opened its doors in NoHo on the corner of Broadway and Great Jones. As Manhattan’s first whiskey distillery in more than 100 years, the four-story space—composed of the ground-floor Grid restaurant helmed by chef Adam Raksin, a subterranean speakeasy and a functioning distillery with a tasting room and retail store—is a moody homage to last century’s roaring ’20s reimagined for this century’s tipplers.

“Elements of grit and grandeur mingle to provide an experience that is classically, quintessentially and unmistakably New York,” says David Fierabend, principal at Groundswell Design Group, who oversaw the interiors. There’s a restored façade with brass accents and Art Deco detailing that opens up to a sweeping grand staircase that recalls the city’s industrial history.

Inside, warm wood paneling, sumptuous leather banquettes and chandeliers invoke old New York, while shiny copper stills are the centerpiece of the second-floor distillery and tasting room.

Art Deco distillery building front

PHOTOS COURTESY GREAT JONES DISTILLING CO.

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Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home {Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Home} – English

The post Modern Industrial Design Gets A Chic Twist In This Aspen Hotel appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Exterior of hotel in Aspen with wood siding

Travelers ready to return to Aspen’s slopes have a sophisticated new lodging option to consider this year.

Aspen Street Lodge offers the look and feel of a private home with amenities that only a luxury hotel can offer, from a resident chef and mountain guide to painting sessions with acclaimed Aspen artist Kelly Peters.

Designed by local architecture firm Forum Phi and built by Madigan + Company, the eco-conscious building—located on the central-Aspen site previously occupied by the Hotel Lenado—is clad with stone and charred cedar chosen to mimic the bark of aspen trees.

Inside, designer Debra Owens gave the nine lodge rooms, two-bedroom penthouse apartment and intimate common spaces a “modern industrial feel with a luxe twist,” she says, by juxtaposing white Venetian plaster walls against warm wood and blackened-steel finishes, and clean-lined furnishings by Poliform, Holly Hunt, Liaigre and Cassina with chunky fabrics, shearlings and leathers.

Sculptural lighting from Apparatus, Roll & Hill and RBW illuminates artful wallcoverings, including hand-painted Porter Teleo designs, “creating a tactile and visually stunning place to relax and recharge,” Owens says. For its first full ski season, the lodge will offer full buyouts only.

PHOTO BY DRAPER WHITE, COURTESY ASPEN STREET LODGE

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Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges {Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges} – English

Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges {Behind It’s Old-World Façade, a Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges} – English

The post Behind Its Old-World Façade, A Modern Palm Beach Home Emerges appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

When a couple decided their Palm Beach vacation home needed a modest refresh, they asked their longtime interior designer, Kelly Anthony, to help select new options for the walls and flooring. But comparing paint swatches quickly turned into something much more. “We studied the house for a bit, and I said, ‘I’ve got good news, and I’ve got bad news,’” Anthony told her clients. “‘The good news is I’m not going to change one thing. The bad news is I’m going to change everything.”

Nearly a decade earlier, Anthony had designed the dwelling’s previous iteration, which featured a classic Palm Beach style. This time, however, she envisioned a clean, modern take on the island’s aesthetic, with an open, light-filled plan. Achieving this would require a full gut renovation, so she partnered with general contractor Jason Willoughby as well as Matthew Quinn of Design Galleria Kitchen and Bath Studio to help transform the structure inside and outside.

First on the agenda was overhauling the layout of the main floor. “It had a real Mediterranean vibe—so a lot of confined spaces and darker rooms,” Willoughby recalls. “Everything was kind of sectioned off.” The walls dividing the kitchen, dining area, living room and loggia all came down, creating a long, beautifully flowing space leading to the back courtyard. The general contractor installed steel-framed windows and doors along the back wall to bring in more natural light as well as views of the plunge pool and elegant grounds in the modest courtyard by landscape architect Dustin M. Mizell. “We made a really small space feel more gracious,” says Mizell, who added plantings such as Senegal date palm, yellow tabebuia and jasmine vines. Two dining areas offer ample space for entertaining, and the wine room now functions as a bar thanks to a new pass-through window into the living area. “Once we connected all the spaces and opened up the back of the house, it took on a completely different personality,” Anthony says.

Quinn, meanwhile, worked his magic in the kitchen. To create a sleek space that complements the rest of the architecture, he cleverly hid appliances and gadgets behind retractable doors and deep drawers. Monochromatic materials such as rift-cut oak cabinets, Cristallo quartzite and deep chocolate-hued wood floors set a sophisticated tone. “It was really about creating a space where somebody could cook a meal if they wanted to, but mostly it was a beautiful space,” Quinn says.

Outside, Anthony and Willoughby intended to smooth the exterior’s textured stucco façade and replace the barrel tile roof with a charcoal flat one. But the town’s architectural commission denied the plans, because several nearby residences were being built in a similar transitional style. Instead, they found other ways to modernize the old world style exterior, including introducing a glass- and-steel front door, a motor court and a ribbon driveway. In the end, “we feel the direction the board made us go in actually provided for more of a unique home,” Willoughby reflects. “We kept some of the traditional elements, which give it that real Palm Beach vibe. Then when you walk inside, it wows you even more.”

Simply opening the front door of the Mediterranean-style façade unveils a dramatic surprise: a modern hallway enveloped in crisp white walls and lined with veined marble flooring. Throughout the interior, Anthony pursued a contemporary color palette dominated by black, white and gray, with neutral pops of ivory. As a nod to the wife, who designs clothes, she channeled fashion influence in each space, incorporating Chanel-inspired bouclé, art with a sartorial spin and jewelry-like light fixtures. “She likes things to be feminine, elegant,” the interior designer says of the wife, “but she also likes a bit of glitter and glam.”

Sculptural and curvy furnishings inject an enticing level of comfort, countering some of the dwelling’s more commanding features—like the dark gray linen wing chairs that play off the living area’s striking black marble fireplace, the bar room’s low-slung beige sectional that balances graphic wall art and the rounded velvet sofa that hugs the marble breakfast table. But the coziest space, rightfully so, is the primary bedroom. “We wanted to make the room feel like it was enveloped in fabric,” Anthony says. “The space feels very clean, open and bright.” With the backdrop of a gray marble fireplace, she warmed the room even more with nubby seating, a plush rug and a channel-set vinyl headboard wall, all in neutral shades.

By the end of the renovation, Anthony was proved correct: The team had indeed changed not one thing but rather everything. And that, it turns out, includes the desires of the residents. “They trusted us to give them what they didn’t even know they wanted,” she says.

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In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style {In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style} – English

In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style {In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style} – English

The post In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

There’s something undeniably romantic about assembling one’s first real home as a married couple. Beyond paint swatches and the search for that perfect sofa, a home is a poetic declaration of what is yet to come. This was true for an engaged Chicago couple who found their future abode in Bucktown. Dreams of barbecues, family gatherings and lazy Sunday afternoons crystallized in this dwelling, with its spacious rooms, outdoor deck and tall ceilings flooded with natural light.

When it came to furnishings, the couple was unafraid to start from scratch, looking to acquire all new pieces for the main living spaces. They embraced the opportunity to develop their shared sensibility, says designer Michael Abrams, whom they recruited to flesh out their residence in time for their spring wedding. “They were creating their first true home together,” explains Abrams. “They wanted this house to reflect that.”

Working closely with Abrams, design director Gina Valenti and senior designer Robert Diamond, the couple felt drawn to a tailored aesthetic, defined by a pared-down palette and streamlined furnishings. The existing interior, however, didn’t match this style. Built circa 2000, the house was bogged down with outdated details like thickly painted cabinetry and clunky brick fireplaces. Alongside builder Marcin Bijos, the team revived these spaces with crisp white crown molding set against black doors and window frames. They also replaced the bulky fireplaces with streamlined mantles. These new additions feature rich finishes like Venetian plaster and hand-applied concrete, “which added tremendous texture,” notes Abrams.

The greatest structural transformation happened in the kitchen, rebuilt from the ground up. As part of the expansive open-plan family area, the previous kitchen seemed disproportionately small. “They have these airy spaces you don’t always get in Chicago, but the kitchen was just wedged in the corner, not making the most of the space,” notes Valenti. With clean lines and smoky oak woodwork, the new generously-sized Italian cabinetry and island helped the kitchen feel more integrated into the home.

Color also proved key to building cohesion. For furnishings, Abrams favored the classic simplicity of black and white with soft notes of blue. Yet simple doesn’t mean dull, as the designer introduced nuance by mixing various materials and textures. Upholstery played with subtle variation, from speckled wools to geometric patterns. Wood surfaces were blackened into a dark rich hue that still preserved the natural grain. Accent pieces brought swaths of glossy ink tones, like the family room’s river-stone-style cocktail table and modular steel bookcases flanking the fireplace. For a more serene effect, the couple’s bedroom included cool slate blues.

However, when it came to establishing a new art collection, the couple steered in a slightly different direction. “When choosing the artwork, they trusted us and made some interesting selections with bold colors and unique forms,” says Diamond. Abrams incorporated Chicago artists to help ground the home in the city’s deep well of contemporary art. This Midwestern pride shines through in pieces like a photograph diptych by Lincoln Schatz in the family area and a vibrant abstract piece by painter Colt Seager in the monochrome living room. “Art is paramount to me,” explains Abrams. “Outside of people, it’s art that evokes the emotion in a room.”

The outdoor space also begged for personality, especially the deck. “Maximizing the square footage was key for this intimate urban backyard,” says landscape designer Jake Gazlay. The small structure was replaced by a larger elevated platform to accommodate room for lounging, dining and grilling. Gazlay favored durable materials that didn’t sacrifice style, like hardy ipe wood fencing and porcelain tile with bluestone finish. He then brought in landscape architects Benjamin Himschoot and Clare Johnson to create a colorful setting using hearty evergreens, classic boxwoods and ivy, as well as a seasonal rotation of annual plantings.

This dramatic transformation was unexpectedly disrupted by the pandemic, which also ultimately dashed the couple’s spring wedding plans. The team rallied to complete the space, feeling a deep duty to provide an abode that could be an anchor for the couple, who eventually married in the fall. For Abrams, changing a dated dwelling into something that felt completely theirs was the most rewarding. “It’s very much a new home,” says the designer. “We delivered an incredible transformation for them to start their life together.”

The team at Michael Abrams Interiors updated a Chicago couple’s abode with modern maturity—achieved by streamlining key interior architectural details like the main stair railing. They also worked with the clients to build their art collection, with new pieces including Winter Sky by Kate Drewniak, displayed on the landing, and two handmade block prints from Los Angeles-based Block Shop over the Noir console.

The post In This Chicago Home, Romance Means Clean Lines And Tailored Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In a house like this, everything is in service to nature and that view, and informed by it as well,” says designer Kimille Taylor of the Telluride abode she and architect Steve Morton, who also happens to be her husband, recently completed for a couple who divide their time between Colorado and Arizona. Together with general contractor Paul Ricks, Taylor and Morton crafted a residence that respects its extraordinary setting and frames mountain vistas from every room. Inside, spaces are airy yet cozy and cater to the owners’ favorite pastimes: painting, woodworking, reading and cooking.

“The clients wanted an exciting plan for a clean, contemporary dwelling with glass walls that open to the outdoors,” notes Morton. Situated on the north side of the valley, it made sense to extend the house wide, like outstretched wings, to take in southerly views and sunshine. The resulting shape “felt like it wanted to take flight,” says the architect, who nicknamed the house “Soaring Eagle.” “The home’s forms mimic a large wingspan and a tail section, and the raised center intersection can be viewed as the head,” he explains. “The perspective and views afforded by the site feel like soaring above the ground below.” Without knowing it, he tapped into a spirit already captured in the couple’s art collection. Serendipitously, hanging in their Arizona home was a large Rebecca Kinkead painting of a soaring bald eagle. “Needless to say, it’s been relocated to Telluride,” adds Morton.

“The house has low-slung, horizontal lines—it’s bold in its simplicity,” the architect continues. “I tend to pare down ornamentation and create something more poetic and understated.” Morton is also driven by “a responsibility to respect nature,” and wrapped the home in silvery-hued stone and cedar siding. Adding integrated planters around the structure offered additional thermal benefits, and tufted-grass plantings visually nestle the dwelling into the land. “It treads lightly, and it has a quiet strength,” he says. Because the clients wanted “an edited style,” Morton worked closely with Taylor to select exterior materials that could continue inside for a cohesive feel. “The result is a soft, warm materiality,” he notes.

“These clients didn’t want to be limited by anything cliché,” says Taylor, who divides her practice between Manhattan and Telluride. “You see a lot of the same things in the mountain decorating world, so we wanted something fresh.” For an element of fun, she found a living room coffee table composed of a glass top that rests on cedar “boulders,” some of which are movable. “It brings a bit of wit to the space,” she says. Organic forms also inspired the table Taylor created for the dining room. “It’s sculptural and breaks up the rectilinear forms of that main living area,” the designer explains.

More uncommon pieces were discovered during marathon shopping trips in Manhattan. “They’d come to New York, and I’d take them out from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. We spent many days like that, and it was such fun,” says Taylor. As a result, the home contains pieces from Liaigre and Apparatus mixed with unique finds from local shops. All these pieces exist against a varied palette. “There are probably 15 different colors present—shades of blue, gray, stone, cream, parchment, camel, brown, taupe and a little maroon,” notes the designer. “This complexity is what makes it successful, along with a lot of textural layering.”

To fulfill the couple’s wish list, Taylor and Morton created two primary suites flanking the public areas (one for the clients and one for his daughter) and additional guest rooms downstairs. They also designed an art studio and a woodshop, as well as a library loft. But it’s the kitchen that anchors the house. “It had to work,” stresses Taylor. “They love to cook, bake and entertain, so we took a long time perfecting the space’s functionality.” An exposed stone wall not only creates continuity with the exterior, but also imbues the space with a sense of age—the kind the designer says you find in old Italian dwellings.

“Everything adds up to their overall quality of life here,” Taylor observes. And when the glass doors open to the fresh air and sunshine—even in winter—the house truly does seem to soar.

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home {Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home} – English

Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home {Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home} – English

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Hearing interior designer Jackie Armour tell the story about the diamond-in-the-rough home that caught her eye in Tequesta sounds like the beginning of a Nancy Drew novel. “I had always been intrigued by the house, because it sits back from the road,” she says. “The vegetation was very overgrown, and you really couldn’t get a good view of the property.” Living around the corner, Armour often passed the site—nearly an acre—during evening strolls around her neighborhood.

When the abode hit the market, a realtor friend invited her for a tour. “Once I walked through, I thought, ‘Oh God, this has so much potential,’” the interior designer remembers. Although the 1989 split-level required some updates, she saw good bones and myriad perks, including high ceilings and rows of sliding glass doors opening to an umbrageous pool deck. “I felt really good in the house, like I was home,” Armour says. Soon enough, she was home: She and her husband, Alan, sold their family residence of 34 years, and the empty nesters embraced the challenge of starting over. “I was very empowered by some of my clients in their mid-60s and 70s who were building new homes and taking on big projects,” the interior designer says, “and I felt like I could do this, too.”

Although the house the couple had built in 1987 sits down the street from their new address, the two structures couldn’t be more different. Their previous residence had an old Florida aesthetic with a wraparound porch, compartmentalized layout and traditional design with estate antiques. The new home, meanwhile, presents a modern- coastal feel with shiplap siding and a tin roof. So the couple decided to welcome the change and make a departure from their previous style. “I knew this house could be really great for entertaining,” Armour says. “Spaces were large and open to each other, and it had great potential for a relaxed, cool, party beach house.”

The work began outside, where she tackled the rampant overgrowth and revitalized specimen trees, including a weeping yaupon holly. The process yielded a surprising discovery: a buried pond once inhabited by koi fish. Now fully restored, the pond waterfall serves as a backdrop for cocktail parties and alfresco dinners.

Next, the interior designer drenched the formerly yellow exterior in bright white, complemented with blue shutters. Inside, she installed French oak flooring and treated ceilings with nickel joint for a modern touch. Armour originally envisioned a white backdrop for the interiors. However, “I never met a pattern or a color I didn’t love,” she admits. “I had a vision for a palette that was going to be light and airy, and I wanted it to feel more tropical.” That’s when the interior designer came across a citron botanical-print fabric that would shape the design of the entire residence. “I always like to start with textiles,” she explains. “That was my jumping-off point for the whole interior of the house.” Armour used the material for draperies in the living, dining and sitting areas, all within view of each other from the entry. “Seeing that fabric repeated everywhere brings the spaces together and gives you a really nice, cohesive feeling when you walk in,” she explains.

Similarly, “I didn’t want a standard white kitchen,” the interior designer notes, opting instead for blue cabinetry. To define the space— which opens to the dining, living and sitting areas—she applied a blue tribal-style wallpaper on two walls, repeating the pattern in the nearby stairwell for more cohesion.

The staircase leads to the main bedroom, where once again, Armour embraced pattern on the walls—this time columns of foliage in tranquil pinks, greens and whites. A pagoda-style bed and retro-looking ceiling fan inject midcentury modern sensibility, while the room’s pink draperies frame window views of tall oaks. “I feel like I’m in a treehouse,” she muses. Outside, the interior designer balanced the magnitude of white space on the L-shaped loggia with durable seating fabrics blocked in aquas and mustard yellows. “If I didn’t know this was a home, I might think this is a resort area,” she says. “It’s very island-like but very luxurious.”

Now, having undergone a redesign of her own—and all the emotions that come with it— Armour says the experience was a reminder of the gratitude she holds for clients having confidence in her capabilities. “It’s a big leap of faith,” she reflects. “I’m really thankful they’ve put a lot of trust in myself and my team.”

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