How To: Developments

How To: Developments

How To connect with and share REALM Developments

Learn more about our Development Members, their projects and how to provide information to your clients.

  • Share information with your clients about a Development through the interactive REALMvue brochures.
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A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views {A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views} – English

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In a house like this, everything is in service to nature and that view, and informed by it as well,” says designer Kimille Taylor of the Telluride abode she and architect Steve Morton, who also happens to be her husband, recently completed for a couple who divide their time between Colorado and Arizona. Together with general contractor Paul Ricks, Taylor and Morton crafted a residence that respects its extraordinary setting and frames mountain vistas from every room. Inside, spaces are airy yet cozy and cater to the owners’ favorite pastimes: painting, woodworking, reading and cooking.

“The clients wanted an exciting plan for a clean, contemporary dwelling with glass walls that open to the outdoors,” notes Morton. Situated on the north side of the valley, it made sense to extend the house wide, like outstretched wings, to take in southerly views and sunshine. The resulting shape “felt like it wanted to take flight,” says the architect, who nicknamed the house “Soaring Eagle.” “The home’s forms mimic a large wingspan and a tail section, and the raised center intersection can be viewed as the head,” he explains. “The perspective and views afforded by the site feel like soaring above the ground below.” Without knowing it, he tapped into a spirit already captured in the couple’s art collection. Serendipitously, hanging in their Arizona home was a large Rebecca Kinkead painting of a soaring bald eagle. “Needless to say, it’s been relocated to Telluride,” adds Morton.

“The house has low-slung, horizontal lines—it’s bold in its simplicity,” the architect continues. “I tend to pare down ornamentation and create something more poetic and understated.” Morton is also driven by “a responsibility to respect nature,” and wrapped the home in silvery-hued stone and cedar siding. Adding integrated planters around the structure offered additional thermal benefits, and tufted-grass plantings visually nestle the dwelling into the land. “It treads lightly, and it has a quiet strength,” he says. Because the clients wanted “an edited style,” Morton worked closely with Taylor to select exterior materials that could continue inside for a cohesive feel. “The result is a soft, warm materiality,” he notes.

“These clients didn’t want to be limited by anything cliché,” says Taylor, who divides her practice between Manhattan and Telluride. “You see a lot of the same things in the mountain decorating world, so we wanted something fresh.” For an element of fun, she found a living room coffee table composed of a glass top that rests on cedar “boulders,” some of which are movable. “It brings a bit of wit to the space,” she says. Organic forms also inspired the table Taylor created for the dining room. “It’s sculptural and breaks up the rectilinear forms of that main living area,” the designer explains.

More uncommon pieces were discovered during marathon shopping trips in Manhattan. “They’d come to New York, and I’d take them out from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. We spent many days like that, and it was such fun,” says Taylor. As a result, the home contains pieces from Liaigre and Apparatus mixed with unique finds from local shops. All these pieces exist against a varied palette. “There are probably 15 different colors present—shades of blue, gray, stone, cream, parchment, camel, brown, taupe and a little maroon,” notes the designer. “This complexity is what makes it successful, along with a lot of textural layering.”

To fulfill the couple’s wish list, Taylor and Morton created two primary suites flanking the public areas (one for the clients and one for his daughter) and additional guest rooms downstairs. They also designed an art studio and a woodshop, as well as a library loft. But it’s the kitchen that anchors the house. “It had to work,” stresses Taylor. “They love to cook, bake and entertain, so we took a long time perfecting the space’s functionality.” An exposed stone wall not only creates continuity with the exterior, but also imbues the space with a sense of age—the kind the designer says you find in old Italian dwellings.

“Everything adds up to their overall quality of life here,” Taylor observes. And when the glass doors open to the fresh air and sunshine—even in winter—the house truly does seem to soar.

The post A Sky-High Contemporary Colorado Home Stuns With Its Aerial Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home {Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home} – English

Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home {Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home} – English

The post Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Hearing interior designer Jackie Armour tell the story about the diamond-in-the-rough home that caught her eye in Tequesta sounds like the beginning of a Nancy Drew novel. “I had always been intrigued by the house, because it sits back from the road,” she says. “The vegetation was very overgrown, and you really couldn’t get a good view of the property.” Living around the corner, Armour often passed the site—nearly an acre—during evening strolls around her neighborhood.

When the abode hit the market, a realtor friend invited her for a tour. “Once I walked through, I thought, ‘Oh God, this has so much potential,’” the interior designer remembers. Although the 1989 split-level required some updates, she saw good bones and myriad perks, including high ceilings and rows of sliding glass doors opening to an umbrageous pool deck. “I felt really good in the house, like I was home,” Armour says. Soon enough, she was home: She and her husband, Alan, sold their family residence of 34 years, and the empty nesters embraced the challenge of starting over. “I was very empowered by some of my clients in their mid-60s and 70s who were building new homes and taking on big projects,” the interior designer says, “and I felt like I could do this, too.”

Although the house the couple had built in 1987 sits down the street from their new address, the two structures couldn’t be more different. Their previous residence had an old Florida aesthetic with a wraparound porch, compartmentalized layout and traditional design with estate antiques. The new home, meanwhile, presents a modern- coastal feel with shiplap siding and a tin roof. So the couple decided to welcome the change and make a departure from their previous style. “I knew this house could be really great for entertaining,” Armour says. “Spaces were large and open to each other, and it had great potential for a relaxed, cool, party beach house.”

The work began outside, where she tackled the rampant overgrowth and revitalized specimen trees, including a weeping yaupon holly. The process yielded a surprising discovery: a buried pond once inhabited by koi fish. Now fully restored, the pond waterfall serves as a backdrop for cocktail parties and alfresco dinners.

Next, the interior designer drenched the formerly yellow exterior in bright white, complemented with blue shutters. Inside, she installed French oak flooring and treated ceilings with nickel joint for a modern touch. Armour originally envisioned a white backdrop for the interiors. However, “I never met a pattern or a color I didn’t love,” she admits. “I had a vision for a palette that was going to be light and airy, and I wanted it to feel more tropical.” That’s when the interior designer came across a citron botanical-print fabric that would shape the design of the entire residence. “I always like to start with textiles,” she explains. “That was my jumping-off point for the whole interior of the house.” Armour used the material for draperies in the living, dining and sitting areas, all within view of each other from the entry. “Seeing that fabric repeated everywhere brings the spaces together and gives you a really nice, cohesive feeling when you walk in,” she explains.

Similarly, “I didn’t want a standard white kitchen,” the interior designer notes, opting instead for blue cabinetry. To define the space— which opens to the dining, living and sitting areas—she applied a blue tribal-style wallpaper on two walls, repeating the pattern in the nearby stairwell for more cohesion.

The staircase leads to the main bedroom, where once again, Armour embraced pattern on the walls—this time columns of foliage in tranquil pinks, greens and whites. A pagoda-style bed and retro-looking ceiling fan inject midcentury modern sensibility, while the room’s pink draperies frame window views of tall oaks. “I feel like I’m in a treehouse,” she muses. Outside, the interior designer balanced the magnitude of white space on the L-shaped loggia with durable seating fabrics blocked in aquas and mustard yellows. “If I didn’t know this was a home, I might think this is a resort area,” she says. “It’s very island-like but very luxurious.”

Now, having undergone a redesign of her own—and all the emotions that come with it— Armour says the experience was a reminder of the gratitude she holds for clients having confidence in her capabilities. “It’s a big leap of faith,” she reflects. “I’m really thankful they’ve put a lot of trust in myself and my team.”

The post Unearthing A Tequesta Abode’s Colorful Potential Leads A Designer Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer {From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer} – English

From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer {From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer} – English

The post From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

portrait of Anna McCraney seated

light green hand-woven Amsha basket

mini gem-shaped soups

In 2009, Atlanta native and RISD graduate Anna McCraney won first place on a Bravo TV fashion series, then blazed her way through the NYC garment industry, teaching fashion design and operating a boutique on the Lower East Side. Five years after launching a consulting business for other aspiring makers, Blank Canvas Development, McCraney headed south for Savannah, coaxed by the SCAD hub’s close-knit community and “amazing well of talent.” Just recently, her brick-and-mortar storefront and studio debuted on Bull Street. There, she displays wares by herself and her clients—all of which are American made using ethical practices and largely sustainable materials. Below, she shares her vision with Luxe.

How do you help burgeoning makers bring their ideas to fruition? We guide our clients through everything from pricing and technical drawings to patternmaking, samples and finished products. We really refine the idea for production, facilitating the entire process.

What are some home goods your Savannah shoppers are loving? We carry dinnerware by Carmel Ceramica, Amsha baskets hand-woven in Rwanda and soft goods featuring my own designs: There’s one with grass and sky, a “melting flowers” print and another I was inspired to make after a trip to Morocco; it’s sort of Berber-esque.

You released a signature “Savannah toile” textile in 2021; what’s new for 2022? We’re adding new colors to the toile like green and red, and next up is a coastal Georgia vintage map print. Our patterns can be used for pretty much any soft goods—think slipcovers, duvet covers, pillows, napkins or place mats.

PHOTOS COURTESY BLANK CANVAS DEVELOPMENT

The post From Bravo To Savannah: See What’s Next For This Georgia Designer appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary {Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary} – English

Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary {Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary} – English

The post Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A guest room at The Lodge at St. Edward State Park

Photo: The Lodge at St. Edward State Park

Originally built as a seminary in 1931, the landmarked brick building anchoring The Lodge at St. Edward State Park sat vacant for 44 years before coming back to life as one of Washington’s newest luxury hotel and spas.

“It’s always been this mystery,” says Jenne Oxford, The Lodge’s general manager. “Now, the community can experience the history of this place firsthand.”

The Kenmore-based hotel weaves together past and present, with painstakingly restored original details and spaces that conjure the building’s yesteryears, including a seminary barber shop-turned-speakeasy bar, original brick façades and windows, and period architectural sketches translated to wall-size murals.

Besides the four floors of guest rooms, a luxury spa, and eateries including a restaurant helmed by James Beard award-winning chef Jason Wilson, the hotel offers a slew of publicly accessible amenities.

Don’t miss visiting a gallery hallway with rotating Northwest artists, high tea service and live music events.

The post Stay At This Luxury Hotel And Spa That Used To Be A Seminary appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List {The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List} – English

The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List {The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List} – English

The post The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Sleek Adri Chair in a Concrete setting with designer

Brooklyn-based furniture designer Arielle Assouline-Lichten has been busy. The founder of Slash Objects recently appeared as a contestant on Ellen’s Next Great Designer and launched her sleek Adri Chair, composed of two marble slabs joined with brass hardware and a recycled rubber seat. “I was inspired by collage artist Adriana Jiménez Blanchet and her process of creating works organized into grids, but also with organic gestures and movement,” says Assouline-Lichten. “I interpreted these gestures as the natural veining of marble and the sling chair as an extension of that movement.” Here, she shares her design insights.

Origin story: I decided to be my own client and design all the things I was imagining. I didn’t know I would turn that initial collection into a company. I love working at this scale—where you can create tangible products in a relatively quick timeline and control more of the process from start to finish.

On circular design: Beauty has the power to persuade, which is why my goal is to create beautiful products that integrate recycled materials. We are still in the nascent stages of circular design and how to make our society reckon with the materials we use. I’d like to be a part of the trajectory.

Ones to watch: I’m swooning over my friend Martina Guandalini’s (@martinaguandalinidesign) resin-and-faux marble pieces, as well as Maryam Turkey’s (@maryamturkey) mixed-media assemblages.

PHOTO: COURTESY SLASH OBJECTS

The post The Brooklyn Furniture Designer Who Should Be On Your Watch List appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

How To: Insights Page

How To: Insights Page

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