An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home {An Inviting Garden Unlocks Possibility In A Serene Denver Home} – English

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Today, while sitting at the grand piano in this Denver home’s dark-walled study, the musically inclined family members residing here look over a rolling, park-like garden dotted with tall trees, tranquil fountains, and areas for relaxing and play.

It’s a far cry from the day when architect Carlos Alvarez and designer Carolyn Morris first saw the dwelling. “Back then, there was no rear garden to speak of, and the home was designed to look inward,” says the architect.

Everything changed when a large adjoining lot came up for sale and the owners (a couple with school-age children) snapped it up. Suddenly, the house was open to a multitude of exciting new possibilities. “They went from a small lawn to a giant garden,” notes Alvarez. “Now there were options. We looked at several, including adding a large addition to the house, but we decided to shift the interior perspective 100 percent to look outside to the new backyard.”

To embrace the lush setting designed by landscape architects Adam Hallauer and Collin Bentley, Alvarez and Morris—partners in business and life—worked with designer Emily Young Alford and general contractor Dave Mosely to gut the home for a fresh start. In addition to making way for a modern interior aesthetic and erasing a confusing layout, starting from scratch gave the team an opportunity to open the rear walls to the garden with a series of large windows and floor-to-ceiling folding doors. The reimagined layout focuses on social events both large and small and seems to draw visitors outside where an architectural pavilion that’s crisscrossed by iron girders awaits.

From the front door, the new story unfolds beginning with a geometric floor composed of taupe travertine and charcoal marble. “The entry is large and very tall, so we created a patterned floor that grounds the space and makes it feel cozier,” says Morris. “Plus, it introduces the clean and modern palette.” Visitors will note another design motif here with a 50-foot wall of rift-cut white oak paneling that runs the length of the first floor. “It’s something like the spinal cord of the home. It’s also warm, organic and modern,” notes Morris. But this is not a feature that’s solely about form—it also contains storage and screens a set of elevator doors.

The main floor is dedicated to the social needs of the family. “They wanted spaces for different types of gatherings,” explains the architect. “There’s a large kitchen with a distinct dining island and a banquette-surrounded table for the family, a separate dining room for entertaining, a formal living room, a family room and a multipurpose room that serves as a study and a music room.”

Upper floors are for family, with one level reserved for the kids and another dedicated
to adult spaces for work and relaxation. “We changed the circulation on the second and third floors. On the kids’ level there’s now room for a lounge in addition to the bedrooms. On the parents’ floor there’s a more luxurious primary suite with room for an office and individual closets,” says Alvarez. Morris adds, “Having private work and play spaces for adults and kids is perfect for a family. They can retreat for privacy or come together to share interests.”

Whether rooms are for individual or group pursuits, Morris gave them an enfolding nature. “I wanted to wrap each room in a distinct material, such as wood or fabric,” she says. “This softened the backgrounds, making great backdrops for the sculptural furniture we selected. Each piece is very intentional and edited, which results in a graphic composition.” That purposeful nature was applied to every element of the house. “The design team created unusual detailing that required ingenuity to build,” notes Mosely. “We worked closely together to make it a reality.” Alvarez recalls the large amount of time and care that went into the smallest features, noting how he worked with Mike Scott of 5280 Custom Cabinetry on elements such as the minimal handles on the pocket doors and the seamless paneling. The labor was not lost on the clients. “These are people who put a lot of thought into things,” Morris says. “They appreciate features that are well done.”

Today, whether relaxing beside the hearth in the living room or lounging by the outdoor fireplace on the pavilion, the family enjoys the sophisticated and serene nature of their new home. “If I used one word to describe the house, I’d choose ‘peaceful,’” says Morris. “It’s a very restful environment.”

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Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence {Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence} – English

Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence {Fall For The Romantic Look Of An L.A. Gem That Channels Provence} – English

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To arrive at Paul and Audrey Hanneman’s West Hollywood home is to visit the South of France. A tall ficus hedge shields the house from the street, and when stepping through its front gate—gravel crunching underfoot—rather than the hum of nearby Melrose Avenue, there’s birdsong and the burble of an aged stone fountain. It’s a cinematic welcome envisioned largely by Paul, a retired film executive and admitted Francophile, who first fell for le Midi when he saw To Catch a Thief. “I love the people, the language, the food and wine, the Louis XVI furniture and the architecture,” he says. And the home, named Maison Lumière, is the embodiment of all he admires.

From Èze to Draguignan, Paul and Audrey have vacationed often in the region, enjoying summertime brocantes and alfresco dining at local bistros. Distilling those memories into a visual wonderland befitting an L.A. neighborhood provided a sensory-driven design brief that captured architect Paul Williger’s imagination. “I welcomed the adventure,” Williger says. “You don’t see a lot of Provençal style here, even though the vernacular is appropriate to the Southern California climate.”

Working with general contractors Jim Hanley and Megan Turner, Williger crafted an authentic-feeling home, right down to operable wooden shutters, but kept it “cleaner, fresher—like we were updating an old apartment in Paris,” he explains. “The original home was compressed, so adding a second story allowed us to open up to the yard.” To that end, the front door was glazed, ground-floor walls were replaced with bay windows and French doors, and the upstairs bedrooms were given balconies. “It’s an oasis,” adds Hanley, noting that plenty of house can be realized on a small lot, “if it’s laid out well.” (This home is just about 2,800 square feet.) “It’s also about quality,” he says. For example, the team tested many finishes to achieve the perfect hue and traditional smooth finish of Provençal stucco, and great effort was made to source and match wood flooring and roof tiles to the ones the Hannemans had already found in France.

Paul, who is studying for his Master of Interior Architecture degree at UCLA, observes that French design is like French fashion: “It looks effortless yet is clearly considered.” The home’s interiors, realized by the couple’s longtime designer Elizabeth Dinkel, bear out this truism. “They represent the culling of many years of collecting—basically our favorite things—pulled together with the help of Lizzie’s amazing eye,” says Paul. He points to objects like the Neoclassical side tables in the family room found at Le Marché aux Puces de Paris Saint-Ouen. Starting with a neutral backdrop to support the couple’s art collection, she began layering in playful pieces such as the Vladimir Kagan sofa—the first piece the couple bought for the project—in the living room. “They liked the contrast with the antiques,” the designer notes.

Elsewhere, Dinkel combined a bench covered in leopard-print silk velvet and the Lucite lamps by Pierre Cardin. In the dining room, she surrounded a contemporary steel table with the couple’s Louis XVI-style chairs, adding café curtains that billow in the breeze. “Our intention was to flood the room with light while still providing a bit of privacy,” she says. “We wanted to highlight the style of the windows and the decorative window hardware without obstructing it.” And in the Hannemans’ bedroom are a Piero Lissoni platform bed and Murano glass lamps. “I love the mix of periods,” she says, equating the home’s style to the decadently blasé vibe of St. Tropez’s famed Club 55.

But it’s the exterior spaces, inspired in part by the legendary designer François Catroux’s gardens at Les Ramades and conceived with another longtime Hanneman collaborator, landscape designer Nikila Rigby Ellis, that perhaps feels the most Provençal-like. “Large trees make a garden feel bigger,” notes Ellis. She placed a pair of fruitless olive trees in the front yard and added cypress for color and verticality, boxwoods as sculptural elements and jasmine and citrus for fragrance. Because the property is small, Ellis employed another clever trick: utilizing crushed limestone for the hardscape. “By not defining a driveway and walkways, it gives a more expansive feel.” The result is a garden that “lends itself to hospitality,” she says.

Whether the Hannemans are hosting friends or family or just enjoying the house à deux, they are assured enchantment. “There’s a magical quality of light and peace here,” says Paul. “It’s the indoor-outdoor ease of life that we so love.”

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From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family {From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family} – English

From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family {From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family} – English

The post From Spec To Spectacular: Inside A Chicago Home Made For Family appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Before we bought the house, my mom was like, ‘You have to paint the whole thing,’” says designer Michael Del Piero’s daughter about the Chicago home that she and her husband purchased in 2019. The Lakeview house was lovely and well built, but what Del Piero’s designer’s eye couldn’t get beyond were the white walls, white trim, white cabinets and white built-ins. “She would have rather we bought an old house or built one from the ground up, but once we agreed to paint everything, we were in business,” the daughter explains.

The familial relationship provided a major advantage from the get-go, thanks to the couple’s intimate knowledge—and long-held admiration—of Del Piero’s design prowess. “We’ve spent enough time in Michael Del Piero creations in Chicago and the Hamptons to know that we like what she does,” says her son-in-law. “She treated us like real clients. Each proposal became more and more tailored to us.”

Del Piero went beyond simply painting the interiors. That was just one part of the personalization campaign she undertook for the couple. “There was certainly less to do than ground-up construction,” Del Piero says; however she admits that the work was still extensive. “It needed more character. We ripped out some built-ins in the family room and replaced them with the concrete fireplace,” she explains. “We completely changed the fireplace in the living room.” In the kitchen, she used the existing cabinets and millwork, but the room had to be pulled apart, repainted and put back together.

Once all the painting and structural changes were complete, it was time for furnishings and art. “We began from scratch,” the daughter notes, “which was really nice because we could make them work perfectly with the house.” The living room started with a large painting by William McLure, an artist whom Del Piero exhibits in her Hamptons gallery, and whom her daughter follows on Instagram. “My daughter was like, ‘Mom, you sell his work?’ ” Del Piero says, laughing at the coincidence. “She saw that painting and we built the living room around it. She’s really got a great eye for art.” In addition to taking the lead on finding most of the art for the home, Del Piero’s daughter also joined her mom to shop for accessories and vintage pieces. “They were fun mother-daughter excursions,” says the designer.

In the dining area just off the kitchen, Del Piero’s daughter helped with another find: the vintage table that looks custom made for the space. “I used to work in personal shopping at Barneys and they called me because this table was broken and they were throwing it away,” she says. “But they knew my mom’s line of business and thought she might want it.” The broken table leg was an easy fix, and then Del Piero turned to local restoration company Kristopher’s Furniture Services, who matched the original wood exactly to give it a more dining-friendly width. Above the table hangs a custom light fixture by found-metal artist Lucy Slivinski. The couple knew Slivinski’s work from other Del Piero projects that feature her showstopping chandeliers. “It’s really special. Lucy made it just for them and it makes the space,” says the designer.

While the majority of the furnishings were new to the couple, Del Piero didn’t forget that this project was all about family. She incorporated two of her son-in-law’s heirlooms—an armoire in the nursery that’s now painted a glossy blue and a chandelier in the main suite’s bathroom—into the decor. It didn’t hurt that her son-in-law has a natural eye for design. “He is incredibly interested in all of it,” Del Piero says. “We have an ongoing family joke that he’s really a designer. He’s going to leave his law practice and come work with me.”

Though that’s not likely to happen any time soon, the couple have only happy memories of the process. They were so delighted with the result that when they learned they were expecting a second child, they called Del Piero to help them finish a playroom and nursery, just in time to welcome her new grandson.

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Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home {Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home} – English

The post Go Back To the Basics Of Historical Architecture With This SF Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Though it may sound cliché, when it comes to big life decisions, it’s often best to trust your gut. This is what one San Francisco couple did during their hunt for a new family home. Over the course of one day, the husband and wife toured seven classic Victorians,

but—although they were all beautiful—“none of them resonated with us,” the husband says. Then, at the end of the day, they walked into a 1909 Prairie-style mansion designed by architect Charles Frederick Whittlesey. “My wife turned to me and said, ‘I want this house,’” he recalls. “I had the same feeling. I immediately fell in love with the history.”

Staying true to that history was important, as was creating a functional space that catered to their needs as a contemporary family. The couple turned to their trusted designer, Kristi Will, who has worked with them on five other homes. “Kristi was the secret sauce,” says the husband. Will’s depth of understanding of interior architecture laid the groundwork for her design. “For me it always starts with the architecture of the house,” says Will, who brought on her longtime general contractor collaborator, Bryan Falvey, for structural changes. “I tried to imagine, if we were collaborating with Charles Whittlesey today, what would our dialogue be?”

That conversation began with the details. “We wanted to preserve as much of the classic 1909 architecture as we could,” says the husband. “I told Kristi that I didn’t want to do things like rip out the staircase. She said, ‘OK, then let’s paint it black.’ ” Will also played up architectural accents such as the moldings on the main level, bringing in decorative painter Katherine Jacobus to coat the dental work in gold leaf. “We wanted everything to feel like it had been completed at the same time as the home,” the designer explains.

The kitchen, with its walnut island and brass accents, is a prime example. “We didn’t want it to feel too modern,” Will says. “I like timeless, classic interiors. I want to walk back into the home in 20 years and know I would still select the same things.” So, for any contemporary accents she chose, such as a mosaic backsplash by Ellen Blakeley, she kept the look fresh without feeling trendy. “It adds a little bit of modern sparkle to the kitchen, but nods to the history of the house,” the designer notes.

Will took advantage of the existing layout, which, while not an open plan in today’s sense, still had a natural flow between the living spaces thanks to the stunning city vistas that carry through the living, sitting and dining rooms as well as the office. “What struck me was the architecture and the connectivity to the views,” the designer remarks. “Although they’re divided rooms, it feels like an open floor plan.” Building upon that easy transition, Will started with a warm, neutral palette for a cozy elegance throughout the dwelling. “We told her we wanted a light and bright feel to the house,” says the husband. “There’s so much energy in the city. We wanted a calming place to be.” Shades of taupe, tan, ivory and gold permeate the rooms, and she carried through the walnut wood accents found in the kitchen (a favorite of the homeowners) into other spaces, such as the main bathroom. “It’s our go-to wood,” the husband says. “It’s so beautiful and timeless, rich and warm.”

The neutral tones didn’t prevent Will, who knew her clients’ passion for pattern, texture and color, from going bold in some of the spaces. In the dining room she commissioned local craftsman Thomas Fetherston to create a red lacquer cabinet that displays statues the homeowners found on a trip to Thailand. More of the couple’s art collection is found in the cozy library, which showcases a multitude of red and orange shades. Will also brought orange into the cheeky power room, covering the walls in a classic de Gournay monkey pattern in a nod to the husband’s penchant for the animal. “They’re a playful and young family,” the designer says. “They were definitely OK with whimsy.”

This intimate understanding of the clients’ personalities—from their passion for design to their easy family lifestyle—is what Will credits for the success of the project. That and the house itself. As she notes, “It’s really about going back to the fundamentals of historical architecture.”

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Feel The Spirit Of The Caribbean With This Designer’s Vibrant Collection {Feel The Spirit Of The Caribbean With This Designer’s Vibrant Collection} – English

Feel The Spirit Of The Caribbean With This Designer’s Vibrant Collection {Feel The Spirit Of The Caribbean With This Designer’s Vibrant Collection} – English

The post Feel The Spirit Of The Caribbean With This Designer’s Vibrant Collection appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Miami Designer Kenzie Leon Perry posing

Furloughed during the pandemic, Miami-based interior designer Kenzie Leon Perry turned lemons into lemonade when he started his own firm, Ze Haus Interior Design Studio, and launched a spirited collection of throw pillows, drapery, fabrics and wallpaper recalling the vibrancy of Miami and the Caribbean. Here, he shares his colorful approach.

How do location and culture influence your pieces? I worked in Jamaica and throughout the eastern Caribbean for an all-inclusive hotel as an interior designer for more than six years, so I’m directly influenced by the culture, people and environment. Having worked with rigid hospitality brand standards while employed at corporate design firms, it was important for me to flip the color narrative by introducing bright and bold hues in the Caribe collection.

What inspired the collection? My Miami neighborhood, Buena Vista West, which is a part of the Little Haiti community. I hand-painted yardbirds (the chickens roam my neighborhood) wearing headdresses and fedoras and surrounded by sugarcane, a Caribbean delicacy grown in the Florida Everglades. The collection has three coordinating patterns as well as original painted portraits of Caribbean people.

Favorite item in the collection? The Plis Kann print, consisting of sugarcane stalks arranged in a chinoiserie pattern, because it blurs cultures with an Asian feel.

What’s next? I’m working with a New York wallpaper manufacturer to produce, market and sell an exclusive wallpaper line designed by myself.

Colorful mood board with fabric swatches, wallpaper

PHOTOS COURTESY KENZIE LEON PERRY

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These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream {These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream} – English

These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream {These Sleek Mountainside Residences Are A Desert-Lover’s Dream} – English

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Rendering of a linear condominium building in the desert

Not everyone believes in second chances. But for anyone who missed out on the 30 Ascent Golf Villas released in mid-February, now is the time to check out the latest from Ascent: 40 luxury condominiums enclosed within a sleek, linear building at the base of Camelback Mountain in Arizona.

The Mountainside Residences offer bespoke design features such as Bulthaup kitchens, two-color palettes that integrate natural materials, and freestanding sculptural soaking tubs in the main baths. And residents will enjoy access to the adjacent Mountain Club, too. This private club is modeled on the historic Jokake Inn, which still stands on the resort grounds. With its rustic wood beams and adobe façade, the club serves as an oasis where residents can pursue wellness and simply relax.

PHOTO COURTESY THE ASCENT AT THE PHOENICIAN

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