Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway {Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway} – English

Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway {Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway} – English

The post Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Offering the sort of secluded luxury that has attracted the likes of the Roosevelts, the Rockefellers and the Vanderbilts, Castle Hot Springs checks all the boxes for a healthful, socially distanced getaway. The historic resort was fully renovated in 2019 and features 30 standalone accommodations as well as three pools of thermal spring water and a 1-acre farm. The design of each cabin celebrates the resort’s unique setting amid the Bradshaw Mountains. Sky View Cabins, for example, feature a raised deck outfitted with a telescope for stargazing. Spring Bungalows nod to the stunning setting with indoor-outdoor bath areas, and the Historic Cottage complements its trio of bedrooms with a stone fireplace and a covered deck where you can unplug and take in the view. The resort welcomes guests ages 16 and older with included meals and wellness-inspired amenities, all just 50 miles outside of Phoenix. castlehotsprings.com

PHOTO: COURTESY CASTLE HOT SPRINGS

The post Castle Hot Springs Checks All The Boxes For The Perfect Getaway appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future {Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future} – English

Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future {Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future} – English

The post Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

From envisaging luxury waterfront private residences on Hibiscus and Palm Islands to shaping Miami’s skyline with projects like the American Airlines Arena, Reinaldo Borges boasts a diverse portfolio in South Florida and the Middle East. His firm, Borges Architects + Associates, is currently celebrating 20 years, its design philosophy driven by tropical modern architecture and a passion for sustainability. Borges often glides over South Florida in an ultralight seaplane, seeking inspiration. borgesarchitects.com

What are you working on? We’re starting on a new Istanbul-based restaurant-lounge concept on the water in Miami, finalizing the Celino Hotel on Ocean Drive, and creating a delivery-only kitchen concept, an important service now with COVID-19. Plus, in Fort Lauderdale, a senior housing high-rise we designed will be the first of its kind in South Florida.

How has the threat of sea-level rise affected what clients are looking for? South Florida is blessed with great exposure to water and that drives a lot of the real estate valuation in our community. At the same time, we are challenged by a future with lots more water. We are designing several waterfront luxury homes with innovative climate-ready strategies to ensure they have resiliency to storms and sea-level rise. It’s a passion of ours to think through the future and design smarter, long-lasting projects.

Looking ahead, share your predictions for 2021. Integrated wellness concepts with sustainability and resiliency design will be big. From trends on how we drain our cities and waterways to reducing our energy footprint, it’s all part of the new normal for architects, planners and those involved with the city and its infrastructure.

PHOTO COURTESY GROSSMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

The post Miami Architect Reinaldo Borges Shares Plans For The Future appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home {Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home} – English

Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home {Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home} – English

The post Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


True love is one of the greatest joys in life. Just ask Henry Givray, former CEO of a management company and creator of a comprehensive leadership learning program, and his wife, Jill Alberts, a notable jewelry designer and owner of a North Shore, Chicago boutique. Yet their present-day romance comes with a backstory. After losing his first wife to cancer four years ago, Henry knew he couldn’t bear to remain in the Bucktown home they had built together from scratch. He wanted a place to create new memories for himself and his two grown daughters, so he settled on a three-bedroom condo in a downtown high-rise building and turned to designer Sarah Vaile to create a warm, inviting space that he expected to be in for the long term.

But Henry soon discovered that life is unpredictable. Within the year, he met Jill and realized that falling in love doesn’t have to be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. “I often will ask, ‘How did I get to be lucky twice in finding something that is so rare and meaningful when most people don’t even get it once?’ ” Henry says. It was time to move out of the condo and into a new home where the couple could grow old together.

For their newly constructed Glencoe home, Henry once again enlisted Vaile. “When Henry called to tell me he felt this way and was relocating to the North Shore, my heart just burst for him,” Vaile recalls. The six-bedroom residence was awash with white-and-gray walls, white marble and an overwhelming two dozen chandeliers and sconces. “We saw a lot of houses,” says Jill, who admits they replaced 14 of the chandeliers and 11 of the sconces. “This was the right one, but it was sort of fancy and cold.” The advantage to this, however, was that it was a blank canvas. After swapping design visions, Pinterest boards and wish list items (an all-black office for Jill, a redesigned home theater by Cinetec for Henry), Henry handed over the reins to Vaile and Jill. “We turned this house on its head,” says Vaile. “We painted or wallpapered pretty much every square inch.”

Jill’s style and personality led the way with the design. Vaile layered new pieces with wares from Jill’s former home and finds from her travels, including Moroccan wedding blankets and an Eero Saarinen Tulip table. “Jill was most definitely our project muse. Every object in her lifelong collection had deep meaning and a great story to go along with it,” says Vaile. “It was both a bit daunting and wildly liberating to decorate for such a design-forward client.”

One of Jill’s initial design ideas—that requested all-black home office—was inspired by a space she’d seen in a magazine years before. “I saved the page, thinking, ‘One day I’ll have an office like this,’” she recalls. “I showed it to Sarah and she loved it and brought it to life.” They also outfitted the room with an enlarged vintage magazine cover, a settee covered in oyster-hued fabric and a nearly 6-foot wood-and-plaster statue of the Buddhist goddess Guanyin. “I’m not a yogi, but she’s the goddess of peace and I thought she was special,” says Jill.

Vaile and Jill worked together to incorporate these bold, eclectic and whimsical touches throughout the home—a painting in the kitchen by Spanish-born artist Rosana Sitcha procured by Jill and Henry on one of their first trips as a couple to Santa Fe, a vintage elephant tusk table that serves as a natural partition between the kitchen and the breakfast room, a palm wallpaper and a vintage 1970s buffet in the dining room. “We liked to joke that buffet had seen its fair share of wild parties,” laughs Vaile.

For Henry, who only brought with him a desk, a poker table and a jukebox, the most important aspect of the home is the meaningful pieces that Jill worked with Vaile to incorporate. “The furniture, rugs and wall treatments are only half the story,” says Henry, who shares an affinity for collecting action figures with Jill’s son, Jack, and has a pair of light sabers from Star Wars on display in the basement rec room. “What makes it all so incredible is all of the extras, like the wall of family photos going up the staircase.”

It’s clear that, apart from preserving past and present in their newly completed home, Jill and Henry are living their best life. “It’s the space to create meaningful memories,” says Henry. “We have a lot of what I call ‘fun rooms’ in the house, but we have a lot of great accents. It feels safe, relaxing and comfortable.”

The post Bold Colors And Funky Furnishings Transform A Neutral Chicago Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional {In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional} – English

The post In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Designer Ramey Caulkins knows some birthday presents are better than others. When her client (who is also a friend) called and said that what she most wanted for her 50th birthday was to completely redo her house, Caulkins was happy to help make her wish come true. “She lives in a stunning vintage home in one of Denver’s most beautiful old neighborhoods, but I would say that she had never really occupied her house like she wanted to, because she hadn’t furnished it as her own,” says Caulkins. “Her gift to herself was recreating it in a way that felt like an expression of who she is as a person.”

The home, a 1912 Spanish Colonial, had captured the client’s heart because of its unique bones: original leaded-glass windows, high ceilings, beautiful arched doorways and intricate millwork in every room. “They don’t make houses like they once did,” says the wife. “I fell for this one because every room seemed to have a story, but it wasn’t until Ramey came along that the furnishings came to life. She was able to edit each room to its simplest form and thoughtfully weave in all these unique layers of subtle color, texture and pattern.”

For the last 10 years, architect Stephen P. Ekman has worked with the owners on the house, restoring the exterior and improving the floor plan. In the latest iteration, he and Caulkins worked together to bring new luster to some of the home’s original interior details. “The goal was to create a cohesive style through the entire house, architecturally and interior design-wise,” says Caulkins. “We began with a spatial plan to figure out how they truly wanted to live in—and use—the house. Because the clients love to entertain, we needed to create plenty of seating areas. And because we were creating better flow between the rooms, we had to make visual connections with color and design elements so that the house would feel cohesive.”

The entryway announces the home’s new aesthetic, a marriage of old and new. Ekman removed layers of white paint from the stairwell to return the handrail and balusters to their original glory. “The feature is unusual and beautiful,” says Ekman. “And now it really shines.” Caulkins brought modernity to the entryway by wrapping the walls in an ethereal cherry blossom wallcovering that feels almost like an art installation in the light- filled space.

In the living room, Ekman designed a new, ornate fireplace mantel that has everyone believing it is original to the house, and Caulkins enveloped the space with paper-backed, oyster-colored fabric by Schumacher to soften and warm the large room. She took design cues from the homeowner’s heirloom rug and layered in patterns and subtle colors that complement its hues.

A sun room that the clients rarely entered has been transformed into an oft-used living space. “This may be one of my favorite rooms I’ve ever done,” says Caulkins, who covered its stamped concrete floor with hexagon-shaped Ann Sacks tile and oriented a cozy sofa and a pair of caned chairs around a bronze drum table to create a proper seating area. Ekman restored the barrel-vaulted ceiling, which now wears new paint to highlight its unique lines. The subtle textures and colors allow the original windows to take center stage.

A new spirit also infuses the dining room. “When you have beautiful bones like this in a house, you want your design choices to highlight them and not take too much attention away,” says Caulkins. Ekman and his team revived the distinctive molding in the room, and the designer oversaw the upholstering of the ceiling above the table in a fabric that looks almost like a watercolor mural. “It lifts the eye and exposes the intricacies of the millwork that may have gotten lost if we’d simply painted it all white,” she notes.

For Caulkins, the goal was an enduring style. “I really strive to design in a way that is timeless rather than trendy. I’m all about the layers and creating something that feels like it’s been slowly curated with a unique mix of old and new. That’s even more fun to do when I have architecture like this to inspire me.”

For the client, the house now feels like an extension of her personality, which is what she had always wanted. She says, “It’s a very personal house with unique touches, layers and details that tell a lovely story. I’ve fallen for my house all over again.”

 

The post In Colorado, A Spanish Colonial Is Reimagined With A Fresh Take On Traditional appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode {A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode} – English

A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode {A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode} – English

The post A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The apartment is a far cry from the couple’s former multi-story abode, which had old flooring and original handcrafted moldings. But Weitzman, who spent years as a fashion and textile designer before founding her own design firm, knew the right layers would add the requisite character. “There are classical references, but it’s not too traditional,” Weitzman says of the space. “It was the perfect fit for me to put my style into it.”

That style–which celebrates mixing textures–is evident immediately upon entering. In the front foyer, a vintage brass chandelier with black-and-white shades illuminates built-in wooden cabinetry with leather pulls and open shelving atop a sisal rug. “It’s not dressy or uptight,” Weitzman says. “Everything is open-grain, functional and utterly simple.” Patterned wallcovering adds another dimension and creates an interesting backdrop for a black bench and an eclectic collection of artwork.

Another wallcovering, this one a light-gray faux grass cloth, plays a subtler role in the main living areas, where it adds depth and character to the formerly plain white walls. For additional warmth, Weitzman had general contractor Josh Wiener install wooden double barn doors on iron hardware, allowing the more intimate library to be closed off from the formal living and dining areas. “I wanted almost a craftsman or country influence,” she explains.

The built-in oak cabinetry flanking the fireplace in the library is likewise very tailored. Wiener and his team created several mock-ups of different woods and stains, fabricating the final selection at his shop in the Bronx. The builder also implemented Weitzman and consultant Wald Studio’s lighting plan. “Amie chose a lot of interesting fixtures,” says Wiener. “The lighting is very soft and romantic. We reframed ceilings and moved ductwork, which you can’t do in a prewar building. There was a lot of potential in this place.”

In the formal living area, a mix of track lighting and new recessed cans illuminate a low-slung sofa and vintage chairs recovered in charcoal velvet around a bleached oak cocktail table. “Lighting is not just important, it’s everything,” Weitzman says. “Well-lit rooms are rooms you want to be in.” A modern fixture in the adjacent dining area, she notes, creates a soft glow over the long wooden table, which is surrounded by Wishbone chairs and a plush upholstered bench. “It has a living room effect, and that’s what I wanted,” Weitzman says, noting that people will linger there for hours after dinner. A fireplace adds to the romantic ambience. Unimpressed with its original stucco finish, Weitzman covered it with dark Venetian plaster and painted the wall behind it to match. “I needed something dramatic, and it’s a great backdrop for my black-and-white art,” she explains.

The contrasting color scheme carries into the kitchen, where black furnishings, including a pair of drum-shaped aluminum pendants, juxtapose the simple white countertops, backsplash and cabinetry, which has flush-faced doors and no hardware. “There’s nothing to distract the eye,” Weitzman says.

A painter herself, Weitzman has filled the entire apartment with both her own artwork and that of others. In the master suite, a large blue painting by her sister-in-law, Shelley Adler, pops against the room’s pale gray walls, and a smaller work by the designer does the same in the open seating area, which features neutral furnishings and a mix of accent tables. “Tables are little pieces of architecture,” Weitzman observes. “It’s all about the shape and movement.”

The gray hues of the master bedroom carry into a bedroom-turned-office. A sumptuous corner sectional sofa becomes a king-size bed when placed side by side, allowing the space to function well for the couple alone or as a guest suite. David and Weitzman can often be found working at his-and-hers desks, where she enjoys painting. “It’s one of my favorite rooms,” Weitzman says.

And Greenwich Village continues to be one of her favorite neighborhoods. After living uptown for so many years, the couple is overjoyed to live downtown again. There’s an energy about it, Weitzman says, a buzz in the air. The designer especially enjoys seeing young students walking to their classes at her alma mater, Parsons School of Design, just as she did many moons ago. “There’s something circular about it,” she explains. “It’s everything I’ve always wanted, and I couldn’t be happier.”

The post A Simple Apartment Becomes A Casually Elegant Abode appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea) {Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea)} – English

Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea) {Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea)} – English

The post Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea) appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Growing up in Shanghai, Cosette Liu worked as a barista and embraced the way the coffee shop felt like a collective space for story sharing. When she moved to Chicago in 2017, she sought to bring that concept to the city—and particularly to the artist community—with her new shop, Living Water Tea House.

“I wanted to create an open and calming space for people to share their stories and learn about a new culture,” she says. Having traveled extensively to tea farms and factories throughout East Asia, Liu learned from local planters and the process of growing and making tea; she serves some of her favorites, such as Dong Ding Oolong from Taiwan and Uji Matcha from Japan, in her Little Italy shop.

Beyond tasting tea and enjoying East Asian-style pastries, visiting Living Water is a chance to experience the handiwork of Chinese artisans: Think handmade teacups—including Shino ware, Jian Zhan and Dehua porcelain pieces—as well as bowls and plates available for purchase.

“We often ignore the importance of objects that surround us,” says Liu, a ceramicist herself. “I want to shift the attention by making these everyday objects a little different.”

PHOTO COURTESY LIVING WATER TEA HOUSE

The post Living Water Tea House Is A Showcase For Chinese Artisans (And Tea) appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh {An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh} – English

An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh {An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh} – English

The post An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It’s a strategy that proved crucial for her latest project, a French Provencal-inspired estate in Coral Gables that called for an interior design refresh. The client, a world traveler who grew up in Kenya, had developed a taste for the exotic. Boasting authentic French details, the home was originally created by architect Bill Taylor and residential designer Phyllis Taylor.

“The rough textured Florida keystone on the front of the house is similar in color to houses in the south of France,” Bill Taylor points out. Inside, Phyllis Taylor incorporated diverse elements acquired during a trip to Paris, including elaborate replace mantels sourced at a flea market and architectural salvage stored in warehouses. “The antique paneling in the library was a lucky Internet find,” she adds. “And features like the kitchen’s tiled barrel vault and the office’s tin ceiling were important components for the ambience of each space.”

Working with designer colleagues Patricia Duran and Susana Kempen as well as general contractor Patrick Lee, Scurtis was tasked with editing the home’s opulent look and giving it purpose. “It couldn’t be decoration for decoration’s sake,” she notes. “And the most important thing was to make this palatial home feel cozy.”

Scurtis began by looking up and down–at lighting and rugs. A Baccarat chandelier in the main living area, for instance, led to the introduction of a second one in the dining room, where the washed faux-wood paneling was an unfortunate shade of peach. “The room was impressive and intimidating, so to make it more elegant we painted the woodwork dark green–like a London supper club–and added an emerald rug featuring a massive leopard on it for a bit of fun,” Scurtis says. The piece rests beneath the owner’s sizable wood table surrounded by antique chairs.

A zebra rug, meanwhile, adds a note of playfulness to the mosaic tile flooring in the office. Sunny and airy, the space is minimally styled with new ivory-colored barrel chairs and the owner’s understated antique desk, allowing the ornate tin ceiling and French-style gold chandelier to take center stage.

A similar idea prevails in the family room, where the team stripped the dark blue ceiling beams and let the client’s rainbow-beaded chandelier come into focus. “A huge set of windows in the room looks out to a canal, so the water and chandelier became our palette guides,” Scurtis says. The trio peppered the o -white sofa with pillows in various textiles and added a rug with an indigo motif. As a final touch, framed HermeÌ€s scarves pop against the room’s new white-paneled walls.

The designers lined the family room’s bar with shagreen leather stools and placed a few more within view. “They’re repeated as counter stools in the kitchen, so there’s a connection from one space to the next,” Duran explains. There, the owner requested a display of art and objects, but Scurtis insisted they be related to culinary purposes. To compromise, she says, “We celebrated his heritage with African pottery and hung beautiful dishes on the walls.”

A nearby corridor connects to the main spaces, and to underscore its prominence, Scurtis lined a wall with mirrors as a nod to the Palace of Versailles. “The homeowner is in the hospitality industry, so he wanted his living spaces to recreate the attention to detail so prominent in his hotels,” Duran says. Along the mirrored wall, the designers placed a black settee to enjoy views of a courtyard it faces–one of the nontraditional ways they considered the client’s love for entertaining. “That hallway is so wide, I thought: What if you had a moment when you break away from the cocktail party where you could sit and enjoy the view?” Scurtis says. “You could have a cocktail party in the courtyard and move to the kitchen for dinner, where the food and prep provide entertainment and theater.”

But when it’s time for relaxation, the master suite is an ideal respite. In a clever move, Scurtis relocated a bed from a guest room–a better t for this space–and paired it with an ivory-colored sofa. To balance the tone of the traditional wallcovering, the team sourced a contemporary rug featuring abstract lines. And in the master bathroom, they added practical elements like a cozy chair and a blue cotton dhurrie rug near the freestanding tub.

By the project’s end, the combined taste of homeowner and designer helped transform the house, ushering it into the future. “His opulent aesthetic and my edited approach work well together,” Scurtis says. “Ultimately, it became a dance we did very well.”

The post An Opulent, Eclectic Estate In Coral Gables Gets A Refresh appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets {Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets} – English

Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets {Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets} – English

The post Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The rebound was led by the familiar big tech stocks boosting the index with a gain of 3.7 per cent to 13,073.82. The rally pulled the Nasdaq out of official correction territory after Monday’s fall when it was more than 10 per cent below its record close in February, and leaves the index 1.4 per cent higher in the year to date.

 

Read the full story on The Sunday Times here.

The post Tech Stocks Bounce Back As $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Boosts US Markets appeared first on Wealth-X.

NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility {NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility} – English

NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility {NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility} – English

The post NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The Rams announced a gift of $3 million on Tuesday afternoon, and they’ve now raised more than $7 million toward what has been one of their long-term program goals.

 

New York real estate scion Stefan Soloviev, an undergraduate student at URI in the 1990s, made the donation on behalf of his family and to secure the eventual naming rights. The Soloviev Family Basketball Practice Facility will be the final renovated product of what is now West Gymnasium at the Tootell Athletic Complex.

 

Read the full story on The Providence Journal here.

The post NY Real Estate Tycoon Gives $3 Million For URI Practice Facility appeared first on Wealth-X.

Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary {Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary} – English

Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary {Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary} – English

The post Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Ross, the chairman of Related Cos., recently invited New York business leaders to a March 15 lunch meeting to discuss what he called the “most important election of our lifetime and in NYC’s history,” according to an email seen by Bloomberg.

 

Ross said the winner of the June Democratic primary will “decide if NYC will rebound or languish” and that he is forming a committee to raise money for a large effort to drive voter turnout.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

The post Billionaire Stephen Ross Raising Millions To Drive Voters To NYC Primary appeared first on Wealth-X.