Google And Others Back Facebook Lawsuit Over Surveillance Tool {Google And Others Back Facebook Lawsuit Over Surveillance Tool} – English

Google And Others Back Facebook Lawsuit Over Surveillance Tool {Google And Others Back Facebook Lawsuit Over Surveillance Tool} – English

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The companies asked the federal appeals court in San Francisco on Monday to let them file a motion in support of a lawsuit that WhatsApp, Facebook’s messaging service, brought last year against NSO Group.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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Goldman Sachs Is Offering Wealth Management To The General Public {Goldman Sachs Is Offering Wealth Management To The General Public} – English

Goldman Sachs Is Offering Wealth Management To The General Public {Goldman Sachs Is Offering Wealth Management To The General Public} – English

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The bank has begun internal testing of a new automated investment service ahead of a broader rollout early next year, according to an email obtained exclusively by CNBC. Employees who sign on to the digital service, called Marcus Invest, will pay an annual management fee of 0.15%, according to the company memo.

 

Read the full story on CNBC here.

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Mark Zuckerberg Has Another Answer To Bitcoin {Mark Zuckerberg Has Another Answer To Bitcoin} – English

Mark Zuckerberg Has Another Answer To Bitcoin {Mark Zuckerberg Has Another Answer To Bitcoin} – English

The post Mark Zuckerberg Has Another Answer To Bitcoin appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

That hasn’t deterred him. Given Zuckerberg’s tendency to issue half-hearted apologies before going back to breaking things, it’s not surprising that he’s gearing up for a second attempt to launch Libra next year.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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BioNTech CEO Confident Vaccine Will Work on UK Covid-19 Variant {BioNTech CEO Confident Vaccine Will Work on UK Covid-19 Variant} – English

BioNTech CEO Confident Vaccine Will Work on UK Covid-19 Variant {BioNTech CEO Confident Vaccine Will Work on UK Covid-19 Variant} – English

The post BioNTech CEO Confident Vaccine Will Work on UK Covid-19 Variant appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The variant, detected mainly in London and the southeast of England in recent weeks, has sparked concern worldwide because of signs that it may spread more easily. While there is no indication it causes more serious illness, numerous countries in Europe and beyond have restricted travel from the UK as a result.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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Parisian Apartment Vibes Imbue A 1939 Houston House {Parisian Apartment Vibes Imbue A 1939 Houston House} – English

Parisian Apartment Vibes Imbue A 1939 Houston House {Parisian Apartment Vibes Imbue A 1939 Houston House} – English

The post Parisian Apartment Vibes Imbue A 1939 Houston House appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The project began when the owners sought Lonergan’s advice on whether to move forward with a house they recently contracted to buy in a coveted enclave of historical homes near the Houston Museum District. Lonergan had helped design the couple’s previous residence on a nearby street and understood their style, which she describes as “very modern with an undercurrent of appreciation for beautiful things that are old.” After touring the new property–a grand 1939 Georgian Revival decorated in styles ranging from country French to French Baroque–Lonergan quickly realized the architectural details were far too ornate for the couple’s streamlined furnishings. But the designer had an idea. “Parisians are known for taking these 18th- and 19th-century buildings and throwing in amazing 20th- and 21st-century furniture,” she says, “so my advice to them was to transform this house to give it a modern, Parisian apartment feel.”

There was a caveat, however: Lonergan felt that only an ultra-modern kitchen would do. “Unless the kitchen completely spoke to that yin-and-yang juxtaposition of Parisian apartments, it wouldn’t make sense.” So Lonergan and Schuster designed a kitchen with German manufacturer Eggersmann that set the tone for the house by pairing light lacquered cabinetry with the room’s existing wood floors and beamed ceiling.

Next, the design team considered the home’s most prominent architectural details. The parquet de Versailles wood floors would stay, as would the entry’s intricate iron stair railing. Schuster–who has since founded her own firm, Inflection Architecture–would replace the ornate moldings and paneling with profiles and proportions apropos of the period of the house, a move that “worked with the couple’s art collection,” she says. And walls would be plastered and painted an ivory hue, “so there was this blank canvas, which meant we could choose where we wanted to add the excitement,” explains Lonergan, who worked with design assistant Taylor Whaley.

That wow factor comes from the art–including works by Gavin Rain, H.G. Edwards and Cristina Guerrero–but also from design details inspired by those works’ colors and textures. In the music room, a lacquered ceiling provides “a little surprise when you look up,” Lonergan says. In the breakfast room, the subtle metallic sheen of a hand-painted Porter Teleo wallpaper catches the eye. The sun room’s surprise is the play on scale created by the rotund, Jean Royère-style polar bear sofa and chair. And in the dining room, it’s the sculptural glass-and-brass chandelier suspended from a mint-green plastered ceiling.

Such thoughtful, if unexpected, touches please these homeowners most. “I would describe our style as very detail-oriented,” the wife says. “We gravitate toward pieces with an artisanal quality, not necessarily things that read as fancy.” With that in mind, Lonergan, Schuster and builder Dennis Britt worked to fill the house with finely crafted details. In the husband’s bathroom, for example, Lonergan created the look of wall paneling by accenting floor-to-ceiling, book-matched travertine slabs with inlaid strips of brass. For the new mud room, Schuster designed built-in storage that accommodates “all the nitty-gritty details of how the family comes into and out of the house.” And in the music room–which evokes a Parisian parlor, with its gilded Louis Philippe mirror, Marco Zanuso Lady Chairs and Murano glass chandelier–hidden sound-absorbing insulation ensures maximum enjoyment of the husband’s impressive collection of audio equipment and vintage vinyl.

Not very long ago, a glittery, candy-colored collage by San Antonio artist Kelly O’Connor caught the homeowners’ attention. A psychedelic commentary on pop culture, the artwork incorporates papers sampled from vintage record covers, described by the owners as an “ironically whimsical” choice for the music room. The piece now hangs above the room’s ornate marble fireplace, creating a striking contrast that’s not lost on a couple who know a thing or two about the magic of mixing old and new.

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Pops Of Colors Make An Artistic Statement In A Breezy Florida Home {Pops Of Colors Make An Artistic Statement In A Breezy Florida Home} – English

Pops Of Colors Make An Artistic Statement In A Breezy Florida Home {Pops Of Colors Make An Artistic Statement In A Breezy Florida Home} – English

The post Pops Of Colors Make An Artistic Statement In A Breezy Florida Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The residence, located in Windsor, melds classic southern and island architecture with modern flourishes such as cantilevered balconies and expanses of glass. Created with an indoor-outdoor lifestyle in mind, the layout directs guests from the front door toward the open-air living space, complete with a lap pool and sitting area. The airy structure includes a large living area, a master bedroom and a loft. A pair of coach houses are also at the ready to accommodate guests.

The exterior had been painted a neutral hue; the inside was clean and white. But once Mickley set foot on the property, things started to change. “When I was younger, I really wanted to be an artist,” he recalls. “I wanted to go to art school, but my mother told me I needed a profession, so I went into interior design. My love of art comes out in what I do–not that I couldn’t do a white-on-white interior, but I love to mix things.”

Mickley’s bohemian blend of colors and forms begin with the dining area’s whimsical light fixture, a dozen pendants with global-patterned woven lampshades made of recycled plastics and soda bottles. He paired the bold piece with a rectangular light wood table and an oversize acrylic abstract on a nearby wall. “It easily could have looked like a modern art museum,” the designer says of the space. “But we brought in warmth through wicker chairs around the dining table.”

The “incredible light” pouring in through the large windows and 10-foot-high doors inspired the home’s palette, Mickley says. He pulled in the blue skies, nature and sunshine with well-considered turquoise, gold and red patterned fabrics; woven area rugs; and sun-bleached wooden pieces, such as the sculptural twin wall mirrors in the hallway between the kitchen and the master bedroom.

Spanning 18 to 35 feet, the ceilings’ monumental height left the home feeling equally airy and cavernous. To make the rooms feel more intimate, Mickley strategically hung abstract artwork throughout at 12-14 feet off the ground, lowering the visual focus. The human scale is especially evident in the living area, where vibrant shades and varied patterns lead the eye around the space–from the tribal print pillows to a beaded African stool and a vintage chair with bird profiles carved into the arms. “When I’m not restrained by someone’s taste, I’m told there can be a very ethnic influence to my work,” Mickley says. “But I do it in a way where everything plays off everything else, and there’s a balance. There’s a great amount of color, texture, simplicity and complication in this house. That yin and yang is what makes it so livable.”

The strategy continues in the master bedroom, where the designer cleverly minimized the voluminous space. Between two mirrored 10-foot-tall doors, he displayed a geometric grass-cloth mural that mimics the clean lines of the 9-foot-tall canopy bed. The mural’s blues and greens also echo the sitting area’s palm print armchairs, which offer a nod to the landscape outside.

The final design is anything but typical, yet totally Mickley. “Don’t make me do something because you think your friends will like it,” he tells his clients. “Do it because you like it. That’s what makes things fun.”

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Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home {Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home} – English

Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home {Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home} – English

The post Old And New Come Together In A Modern Aspen Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“I come from a family of pack rats,” she says, lamenting the limited capacity of her previous homes in New York and California to harbor her beloved bequests. So she found room to spread her wings on a forested hillside residence, and hired designers Joe McGuire and Matthew Tenzin to express her eclectic modern aesthetic by weaving together fresh furnishings with her diverse collection of rugs, textiles and family antiques against a modern backdrop.

The house was constructed by residential designer and builder Tim Semrau, who was inspired by the site. “Aspen trees surround the house and their tall, narrow trunks combine with the mountain ridge behind the home to give a true sense of the area’s verticality,” he says. The house is mostly crafted from an industrial palette of steel, glass and metal; though the rich mahogany siding roots the dwelling in its forested environment.

From the beginning, the project was highly personal, a process the homeowner has long been comfortable with, since her mother was a designer and conversations around her childhood dinner table were often about interiors. “Having your home be a place upon which you spend a lot of emotional energy because it’s your haven is just an idea I grew up with,” says the homeowner. “And it can’t be your haven unless it relates to you.”

The designers whole-heartedly agree. “It was a highly collaborative process driven by the client’s creativity and international tastes,” Tenzin says. “She wanted us to help her come up with an overall plan, and she loves so many kinds of patterns, colors and styles, she needed help reining it all in and creating a sense of balance and harmony.” Excited to punctuate her inheritances with a new selection of textiles and gallery-worthy sculptural furnishings, McGuire and Tenzin began to create stylish rooms that also feel familiar and comfortable.

In the master bedroom, for instance, a wool-and-silk prayer rug from the family collection hangs on the wall, while a more recent acquisition, a Navajo rug, lies on the floor. The crimson colors and geometric motifs found in both pieces create cohesiveness. A pair of pillow shams printed with Art Nouveau painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s famous cancan girls are a novel choice in a room where ethnic patterns dominate.

Likewise, in one of the guest bedrooms, another tribal textile on the wall–a Two Grey Hills Navajo rug inherited from the homeowner’s great grandmother–effortlessly jives with the woven-leather bench at the foot of the bed. The neon green, cerused-wood bedside tables play a dynamic role in an otherwise neutral space.

At times, the sculptural quality of a piece outweighs its function. “‘Plush’ or ‘cushy’ were never requirements for the furniture,” says McGuire. “However, the shape of things was paramount.” Shapely elements include a cedar bench designed to look like a giant clothespin that brings Pop art-inspired form and function to the foot of the modernist glass staircase in the foyer. A Lindsey Adelman chandelier with asymmetrical brass joints and amorphous glass spheres is suspended from a slatted ceiling, adding clarity to the dining room in more ways than one.

Further eschewing the popular notion of a mountain home and drawing on a global aesthetic, a Robert Sukrachand walnut bed is topped with nothing more than a Japanese futon to match the low-profile of the piece and the Thos. Moser dining chairs are influenced by midcentury Danish minimalism. The great room (vaguely Southwest inspired with its shades of sandstone and sky) features curvy swivel chairs with cozy dimensions and a built-in rectilinear sofa whose rigidity is softened with an assortment of snuggly pillows.

Two of the most striking pieces in the home, the black De La Espada Nest chairs that flank the stone-tile hearth, initially gave the designers pause. “We were unsure about this unconventional seating arrangement in front of the main fireplace,” says McGuire of the decor’s statement-making moment. “But the client had a clear vision for them, and they turned out to be whimsical and sculptural focal points that also serve as a quiet retreat.”

In a home where unconventionality is celebrated, the harmonious vibe McGuire alludes to might seem elusive, were it not for the time-tested idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. “Think of this house like jazz,” says Tenzin. “The occasional off-key notes create a higher-level harmony, and a lively sense of personality and authenticity.”

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Chicago Design Pros Share Which Spots In The City They Miss The Most {Chicago Design Pros Share Which Spots In The City They Miss The Most} – English

Chicago Design Pros Share Which Spots In The City They Miss The Most {Chicago Design Pros Share Which Spots In The City They Miss The Most} – English

The post Chicago Design Pros Share Which Spots In The City They Miss The Most appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

AMY KARTHEISER
Founder, Amy Kartheiser Design

“I’m excited to treat myself to a day at The Peninsula Spa with friends. The whole experience is dedicated to wellness, including the design, which forms a warm, relaxing and soothing environment. It marries luxury with simplicity in a way that makes you feel like you’ve entered a haven from city life. I love to start with a restorative yoga class before indulging in a full day of spa treatments and lunch on the outdoor patio. I always leave feeling relaxed and rejuvenated.” peninsula.com/chicago

PHOTO COURTESY PENINSULA HOTELS

MICHELLE JOLAS AND LAUREN LOZANO ZIOL
Co-founders, SKIN

“We have always loved Le Colonial for its chic, 1920s French Colonial Asian interior and ginger martinis. From the moment you enter its new location on Oak Street, you’re transported to another world—and we can’t wait to go back. On the enclosed patio, decorative floor tiles, Asian lanterns, proper white tablecloths, orchids and cane-backed chairs are juxtaposed with the dark, sultry wood-paneled bar. The ambience is heightened by the attention to lighting detail, fabric shade fixtures, lanterns and fans, which make you feel at home.” lecolonial.com

PHOTO COURTESY LE COLONIAL

JEN TALBOT
Principal, Jen Talbot Design

“I have missed connecting with my local vintage vendors. One of my favorite stores in the West Town neighborhood is South Loop Loft, which is filled with edited vintage finds from owner Beth Berke’s extensive travels to Italy and Paris. The in-store styling and carefully curated vignettes are so inspiring—and not an experience you can have unless you are in the physical store. I have missed all the small details, such as her accessory wall and vintage fine-art collection. Beth and I will often have Champagne and share some laughs.” thesouthlooploft.com

PHOTO COURTESY SOUTH LOOP LOFT

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The Tropical Vibes Are Strong In This Energetic, Island-Inspired Florida Home {The Tropical Vibes Are Strong In This Energetic, Island-Inspired Florida Home} – English

The Tropical Vibes Are Strong In This Energetic, Island-Inspired Florida Home {The Tropical Vibes Are Strong In This Energetic, Island-Inspired Florida Home} – English

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Designer Kara Hebert and general contractor Michael Maxwell have collaborated on an extensive list of residential projects. But, naturally, the engaged couple’s most meaningful joint venture is their most personal: their new home in Jupiter, Florida.

The duo designed the house from the ground up, conceiving a traditional West Indies-style abode that is colorful, energetic, approachable and, most importantly, accommodating for their blended family of five children and two dogs. Accustomed to joining forces, Hebert and Maxwell have a strong sense of each other’s style preferences, which tend to align. “We have always had similar goals in mind when working on any project, and this one was not very different,” Hebert says. “Michael is the construction part with strong interests in millwork and carpentry, and I come in with my love for textiles, wallpaper and lighting.”

Before the shiplap ceiling beams and patterned draperies went up, however, the pair had to consider how to wisely utilize coverage of a tight lot. “We needed to look at this in a nontraditional way, and the relationship of the surrounding homes and the lot’s uniqueness made me think about having a courtyard,” architect Dennis Rainho says of his idea to center the structure around an outdoor area. “The courtyard, connected to all common living spaces, makes this work.” He surrounded the courtyard with French doors and tall windows rather than walls, granting visual access from places such as the entry hall and bringing in natural light—as well as views of plantings by landscape architect Steve Parker. “It feels like a gallery when you walk in,” Rainho says, “and that sets the mood for the entire house: special, cozy and inviting.”

Inside, living areas are grounded with a soothing palette of white walls and marble flooring as a cohesive backdrop for the couple’s love of tropical colors, particularly blues and greens. The hues appear throughout in patterns and prints on furnishings and decor, starting with aqua draperies in the entry hall, where personal touches are also on full display. Hebert organized a gallery wall of family photos—which she calls their “memory station”—and hung a Gray Malin print of their favorite beach on Harbour Island in the Bahamas, where the couple frequently escapes to.

The hall leads to the family area, connected to the combined dining space and white Shaker-style kitchen, which displays the designer’s heirloom dishware on open shelving. Pale blue backsplash tile, rattan dining chairs, a white-washed table and a navy runner evoke the beachy vibe the couple appreciates. “Most decisions were pretty easy for us, as Michael and I both like happy colors and simple design,” Hebert says.

Amid the style selections, the couple took steps to maximize every inch of the floor plan. For instance, as sleeping arrangements for the three daughters, Hebert relocated windows and doors in a bedroom to accommodate two sets of chic, white bunk beds with Chippendale railings. Pink and orange ikat draperies add a whimsical feminine look that complements the lavender grass-cloth wallpaper of the adjoining bathroom. The den, meanwhile, acts as a fourth bedroom, with a blue-striped queen sleeper sofa near a coral armchair. There, Hebert payed homage to Maxwell’s former career as a professional skateboarder by mounting a custom wood rack of his boards, displaying the colorful collection like artwork. “I love incorporating a variety of art into clients’ homes, using a mix of abstract pieces, photography, even china,” she says. “It creates a sense of history and meaning. Skateboarding is a big part of Michael’s story, so we included that here.”

Not every aspect of the project came without a difference of opinion, however. Hebert, for one, insisted on installing a pool, even a modestly sized one. To get Maxwell on board, she taped out the shape of the feature multiple times in the courtyard to find the right spot for the plunge pool and waterfall wall. “Quite honestly, it’s such a great focal point,” the general contractor concedes.

As for his part, Maxwell envisioned the master quarters as a hotel suite, with an open-space bedroom and bathroom—no door separation, a compromise for Hebert. The aqua-hued bedroom seamlessly transitions from seagrass flooring to marble in the bathroom, which shares matching draperies near a freestanding tub.

In the end, the couple blended not just their family but also their lifestyle vision, with a perfect mixture of warmth, comfort and memories—an achievement Maxwell credits Hebert for making their house a true home. “Kara makes everyone she works with happy,” he says. “Every house she has done is like walking into a big hug.”

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Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway {Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway} – English

Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway {Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway} – English

The post Colorful Interiors Reign Supreme In This Revamped Naples Getaway appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It’s a classic renovation tale: A couple buys a Naples, Florida vacation house. It’s ideal for them in the moment—turnkey and kitted out to perfection. A decade or so elapses, and times and needs change. Such was the case for designer Billy Ceglia’s longtime clients. “They looked at moving, at seeing what else was out there because their family had grown,” says Ceglia. “But they loved the location, and the house—it was just dated. They decided to stay, keep the memories, and make it fresh and new and right for their family now.” After two previous projects together, the designer and his clients had built serious trust, so Ceglia had nearly free reign on the house. “The ideal clients understand that they’re hiring professionals, so there are more functional and programming notes,” he observes.

In the revamp, out went the muted, tea-stained palette, bamboo furniture and tropical prints, and in came thoughtfully reworked spaces, tailored silhouettes and flourishes of bold color. “We gave it half a face-lift,” Ceglia says with a laugh. “And touched nearly every surface.” The designer’s efforts are visible outside, where orange barrel tile on the roof was replaced with flat, gray tiles. “It looks a little more like the Italian countryside,” he says. And then, “We painted everything that stood still white,” he says, referring to the now crisp finish on the formerly beige-y precast concrete façade. Ceglia took a similar tack inside, applying a whitewash to the walls. “I don’t like to go against what the outside tells you, so that you think, ‘Wait a minute, did I teleport somewhere else?’ It feels relatable to the exterior and to their lifestyle.” He directed paintbrushes to the architectural details as well. Columns and ceiling beams also received a white coat, and, to heighten that dolce vita vibe, the interiors of the ceiling coffers are blue. “It kept that feeling of open-air space,” notes the designer.

Ceglia kept the interior plan mostly intact. Well laid out, the bathrooms required only cosmetic overhauls, but the kitchen (and the adjacent breakfast area and family room) was a different story. “It had been a giant dead end,” says the designer, “so we took out a peninsula and swapped in a bigger island.” To accommodate the couple’s grandchildren, he created a kid zone there with storage conveniently positioned for little hands to grab paper plates, napkins and snacks. He also removed an existing bar to make way for a multi-person home office, while the family room gained more seating to accommodate their visiting tribe.

Rather than choosing all-white finishes for the kitchen, “We worked with Waterworks to find the palest gray paint for the perimeter cabinets and a stain for the island with a yellow undertone,” explains Ceglia. The latter hue was both an aesthetic and practical decision, as one of the few finishes kept was the travertine flooring. “It would have been a major undertaking to rip it out,” says general contractor Tom Lawrence, “and it was a beautiful element of the house, so why remove it?”

While the kitchen reads neutral, the rest of the open-plan house tells a thoughtfully woven color story. “We wanted it traditional but fresh and youthful, so we chose stronger colors on more classic furniture,” notes Ceglia. In the living room, a deep turquoise fabric with a subtle white ribbon pattern offers up an English-meets-South Florida vibe. “In the dining room, the color mellows and mutes on the host and hostess chairs and whispers in the chinoiserie wall panels,” he notes. The palette picks up steam again in the breakfast room, where a paler turquoise covers the pillows on a set of gray upholstered chairs before making a bigger statement on the family room’s sectional and lounge chair. The boldest expression is found in the vibrant wallcoverings in the turquoise guest room and bath. “We made an S curve that moves your eye through the house,” the designer explains, “When you’re outside looking back in, you see all of those rooms.”

For Ceglia, his clients’ home offers a compelling lesson for others faced with a dated abode. “You can look at this house and realize that you don’t have to start from scratch,” he says. A big part of the equation, though, is making decisions that will hold up in years to come. “I want my clients to do it once and never have to do it again,” the designer shares, “I like to choose classic, wonderful, comfortable things that they won’t tire of.”

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