A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New {A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New} – English

The post A Home On The SF Peninsula Reflects Old And New appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Those are just two of the many thoughtfully considered details that followed–but before there was a stove, cabinets or colors, there was just a 2-acre property containing a thicket of old trees and an unremarkable house. “You couldn’t even walk in the backyard,” recalls landscape designer Andrea Kovol who, with landscape architect Ron Lutsko Jr., eliminated all the invasive species and planted new trees along the perimeter of the property to both define and screen the plot.

That south-facing clearing became the anchor for a sprawling family home where the owners hoped to escape the strife of city living. “We left San Francisco for better weather and a yard,” says the wife, who had grown weary of driving around the city searching for a park where her three young offspring could play. “We were building a ground-up house and other than big windows and lots of light, we really didn’t know what we wanted.”

Early conversations with architect Richard Beard revealed otherwise. “They didn’t want anything overtly traditional, but definitely not aggressively modern either,” says Beard. “Incorporating family was essential.” He honored those wishes with a large dwelling that reads as a series of intersecting structures built with stone, cedar and dark steel and surrounded by a number of outdoor spaces for living and play. The home, built by general contractor Bryan Murphy, is new, but the assemblage of contrasting materials implies a sense of age, modernity and originality.

Hohla, in concert with designer Alana Dorn, embraced that balance of old and new in the interiors. This is the third project Hohla worked on for this family, so she was familiar with their previous residences, including the one before this, which featured traditional rooms outfitted with French, Italian and English antiques. But in this case, the designer thought the new home should not be a case of history repeating itself. “I have been dreaming about this house for this family for a long time. From the beginning, we determined that it should have more of a clean-lined and edited feel,” she says. “We wanted to incorporate some of the antiques, but in a more modern way.”

That line of thinking gives rise to the amenable mingling in the living room of a tailored sofa with a gently curving back and a pair of more ornate antique side tables (one adorned with an elaborate mother-of-pearl inlay, and the other with gilded accents). The classic, wingback style of a pair of vintage Paul Frankl seats and Holly Hunt armchairs play against the striking lines of custom-designed coffee tables with aged-brass bases and natural stone tops. And, while an heirloom duet of curling Pierre Cardin table lamps adds a flourish to the room, it’s a brass chandelier reminiscent of a cascade of bangle bracelets that brings the drama while dangling from the 14-foot-high ceiling. “I’m obsessed with light fixtures,” Hohla says. “They are the jewelry of a room and the first thing your eye goes to.” The stylish mix is one of the features that makes this the wife’s favorite room in the house.

In addition to the layering of old and new, Hohla went the extra mile when combining textures and lines. “I come from a family of engineers and I lay things out in a very planned way,” she explains. In the master bedroom, where Hohla wanted a serene and ethereal environment, she commissioned decorative artist Willem Racké to create lacquer walls with a subtle strié pattern done in soft colors. This is a counterpoint to tailored elements such as the custom bed, settee and embroidered ottoman and the bolder Ralph Pucci lounge chairs, Hervé Van der Straeten bronze light fixture and the contemporary painting. As in the rest of the house, vintage alabaster lamps and demilune nightstands add traditional touches in the new structure.

Unifying classic and contemporary elements was an aesthetic the designer carefully negotiated and considered. “The homeowners’ main concern was always about going too modern and mine was about staying too traditional,” Hohla shares. “I wanted them to have an updated home that feels timeless and that they can grow in–I think we were able to strike the perfect balance.”

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A Florida Winter Retreat Is All About Tropical Vibes {A Florida Winter Retreat Is All About Tropical Vibes} – English

A Florida Winter Retreat Is All About Tropical Vibes {A Florida Winter Retreat Is All About Tropical Vibes} – English

The post A Florida Winter Retreat Is All About Tropical Vibes appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“I wanted our home to feel integrated, alive and warm,” Barbara says of the hacienda-style residence they purchased in Hobe Sound, Florida.

To foster that feeling, the couple tapped interior designers Jackie Armour and Marcus Schult who incorporated lively patterns, vibrant colors and worldly pieces that reflect the couple’s passion for travel into the home.

“My mantra is more is more,” Armour explains. “This is them with a Florida twist.”

The dining room’s nature-inspired wall covering, featuring blue, white and coral hues, sets the direction for the entire interior, with the colors reverberating in different combinations throughout the house. “The rooms sort of waterfall into each other,” Schult explains.

“I wanted them to have a little fun with it, and they did a very good job,” Barbara says. “I’m sure we’ll have a lot of friends visiting.”

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Take A Trip Around The World Without Setting Foot Outside This New Connecticut Showroom {Take A Trip Around The World Without Setting Foot Outside This New Connecticut Showroom} – English

Take A Trip Around The World Without Setting Foot Outside This New Connecticut Showroom {Take A Trip Around The World Without Setting Foot Outside This New Connecticut Showroom} – English

The post Take A Trip Around The World Without Setting Foot Outside This New Connecticut Showroom appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

From Balinese umbrellas with Thai elephant stands to Louis V and VI teak seating and Austrian contemporary furniture, the newest Lars Bolander showroom is an eclectic study of global treasures that transcend time. The Westport, Connecticut, shop (1300 Post Road East) boasts 2,600 square feet of contemporary furniture, textiles and decorative accessories as well as European and Scandinavian antiques. Bolander first delved into retail when he opened a shop in East Hampton in 1987 with his wife, Nadine Kalachnikoff, and he currently has an antiques shop in West Palm Beach. Their son, Chris Kalachnikoff, is the Westport store manager; here, he shares details about the new venture.

Why Westport? “We have had two shops in New York in the past. They were both great locations, but the shops restricted us from showcasing a wider range of furniture due to the size of clients’ apartments and the lack of outdoor space. Coming out to Connecticut was a natural next step and finding a unique space was paramount. Westport appealed to us for its rich artistic history, diversity and its more European feel than many other areas in the vicinity.”

How will this shop vary from the others? “We will delve more into accessories and have numerous trunk shows. We’re also getting more involved with our clients as they have been more hands-on with their own home-decorating as of late.”

What can we look forward to? “Our upholstered and our outdoor seating collections, which we never did in Florida. There will also be book signings, painting exhibitions and cocktail parties when we receive new shipments.”

Painting at Lars Bolander showroom

PHOTOS COURTESY LARS BOLANDER

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Behind The New Digs Of 3 Design-Forward Brands In New York {Behind The New Digs Of 3 Design-Forward Brands In New York} – English

Behind The New Digs Of 3 Design-Forward Brands In New York {Behind The New Digs Of 3 Design-Forward Brands In New York} – English

The post Behind The New Digs Of 3 Design-Forward Brands In New York appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

PHOTO COURTESY JONATHAN ADLER

Luxe explores three new design-forward spaces from brands as stylish as their showrooms.

Denmark’s design-forward speaker company Bang & Olufsen tapped Tokyo-based Simplicity to create its new 2,200-square-foot flagship in SoHo (121 Spring St.). Blonde wood features almost exclusively throughout the various listening stations, resulting in Scandinavian minimalism crossed with New York’s monochrome industrialism. There’s also an enhanced listening room for experiencing new products like the Beosound Stage or the Beoplay E8 3rd Generation.

Uptown, the Jonathan Adler flagship (135 E. 65th St. and Lexington Ave.) encompasses 5,500 square feet of the furniture brand’s signature whimsy: funky lighting, curvaceous seating in bold colors, idiosyncratic ceramics, candles and pillows. The bi-level showroom features themed residential vignettes to provide inspiration and will roll out new merchandise before it lands in the brand’s eight other boutiques nationwide.

Temple Studio (51 E. 12th St.) is the hot newcomer for fabric, wallpaper and rug designs. Launched by Studio Four co-founder Kate Temple Reynolds, its airy 3,500-square-foot showroom in Greenwich Village artfully displays the works of the 19 designers it represents.

Please check the showroom websites for any changes in opening hours due to COVID-19.

showroom with fabrics on wall

PHOTO COURTESY TEMPLE STUDIO

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Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow {Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow} – English

The post Deep Tones And Moody Wallpaper Add Drama To A Renovated Oregon Bungalow appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It wasn’t interior designer Suzanne Childress’ preservation chops that landed her a job updating an 1890s bungalow in Ashland, Oregon—rather, it was her love of wallpaper. Her clients, San Francisco-based Kirsten Ziegler and her husband, J Frederick, had bought it as a second home a decade earlier and decided it was time to renovate. They were finalizing plans with general contractor Brad Youngs, of Brad Youngs Construction, when Kirsten saw a project that Childress had done. “I was searching online for ‘cool, modern wallpaper,’ and there was an image of a design by Suzanne that grabbed me,” she recalls.

Childress did more than select an assortment of dramatic wallpapers for the project, though. She proposed a series of structural changes that made the 1,000-square-foot house at once functional and inviting—from moving walls and reconfiguring rooms to outfitting the spaces with creative storage solutions. “I love old houses,” says Childress, who once worked as an attorney with the Environmental Protection Agency. Her side gig—redoing her historic home in Annapolis, Maryland—set the stage for a major career shift and an eventual move west. “If a house has quality bones, then I’m all about working them into a new design concept,” she says. “But this house was a real patchwork; there wasn’t anything worth preserving.”

Kirsten and J, who both work in the tech world, embraced her suggestions. “We were so enamored with the home’s location—we’re a block from the theater complex and can walk to downtown,” says Kirsten. “It certainly wasn’t because the house was so gigantic or because the interior was so darling.”

That meant a gut renovation and installing all new floors, windows and moldings. Childress tweaked the plans to transform what had been envisioned as a semi open-plan kitchen into a more traditional space. She also worked with Youngs, who has since retired, and his team to bump out a wall to include a small eating area. What the house lacked in size, it made up for in vertical space, so Childress capitalized on the high ceilings, tucking base and top cabinets everywhere she could. What was once a second bedroom became a cozy parlor featuring a two-sided fireplace that opens to the adjacent living room. Childress was also able to carve out two additional spaces for the couple: a tiny study and a nook that holds a sofa and a TV.

Finding a balance between old and new was her goal. “Kirsten and J were worried when I suggested dropping in more doorways,” says Childress, “but the spaces would have been too busy had we left them open. Now the rooms unfold as you walk through them.”

Taking a cue from what Childress calls “the rock-and-roll edge to Kirsten’s style,” the designer incorporated deep tones to dramatic effect. She set off the gray-painted walls in the living room and part of the kitchen with black moldings and window frames. In the parlor, she paired black gloss paint with a similarly hued imitation crocodile wallcovering for an atmospheric air, accented by touches of gold and brass in the furnishings and hardware. Finished in black paint with brown undertones, the kitchen cabinetry creates a striking foil to the marble-like porcelain counter and backsplash as well as the upper cabinets stained a rich brown. “It took a lot of rounds to get the stain right, but it plays so nicely with the tones of the brass and black,” Childress notes. “Brad had the knowledge and expertise to make it happen.”

Considering the diverse wallcoverings that Childress selected, Kirsten and J are hard-pressed to name a favorite. J leans toward the woodland animal paper in the study, while Kirsten says that though she was initially unsure about the enchanted-forest-themed print in the master bedroom—appropriately called Midsummer Night—she now loves it. “I wondered if I was going to hate it in six months because it’s so different, but J really liked it,” she says. “We looked at other ones, but I said, ‘Let’s just do it,’ and I’m so glad we did. It’s really sultry and ethereal with the lights on.”

Childress believes the fact that the couple lived in the house before they started renovating is key to the project’s success. “It’s nice if you can get the idea of the flow and what’s working and what’s not. I’m always curious when a client says, ‘Oh, we never go in there’ or ‘We never use that.’ Most of us can’t afford to have rooms you never go in,” she says. “You need to make the most of all your spaces. That was what I wanted to do here—to make all the rooms spaces they really wanted to be in and enjoy.”

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A Polished European-Inspired Home Shines In Atlanta {A Polished European-Inspired Home Shines In Atlanta} – English

A Polished European-Inspired Home Shines In Atlanta {A Polished European-Inspired Home Shines In Atlanta} – English

The post A Polished European-Inspired Home Shines In Atlanta appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


After the homeowner married his college sweetheart and the pair made plans to start a family, conversations naturally gravitated toward the need for something more grown-up to accommodate their lifestyle and appropriate for the little ones they hoped would soon be toddling around. So, they turned, once more, to Brown–who gladly signed on for the interior design but also introduced the couple to the very house and lot they ultimately purchased. “The road it’s on is one of the cut throughs to my own neighborhood,” the designer recounts. “When I drove by the site, I immediately knew it would suit their needs.”

Architect Linda MacArthur authored the original plans for the French Normandy-inspired residence, and general contractor Stan Benecki tackled the construction. Yet the classic European approach to the house, it turns out, is somewhat of a ruse. Just beyond the threshold, visitors encounter starkly different interiors. “Inside, all of the moldings and trim were minimized for a clean, contemporary look,” says MacArthur.

Brown, who came on board during the framing stage, developed the handsome gray wash for the wood floors and vouched for the tones of Venetian plaster that lend an elegant backdrop to his warm-modern selections of fabrics, furnishings and art. “They like to live casually,” Brown says of the homeowners. “So, we added industrial touches, sea grass carpets and stones that were honed, rather than polished, to tone down any sense of formality. It’s sophisticated yet simple.”

The interior scheme is unified by an understated neutral palette with lots of high-contrast black and white: a monochrome most evident in art that brings graphic, gestural tension to simple furniture silhouettes. Namely, in the dining room, a dark cypress ceiling, custom flat-weave rug and oversize painting intentionally “take your attention away from the leggy buffet and chairs, which could otherwise read very busy in the middle of the room,” Brown explains.

Owing to his former life as a menswear designer, Brown tends to approach projects like a tailor, combining streamlined custom furnishings with polished and masculine details. While this was ideal for the couple’s former penthouse bedroom, the wife requested a softer aesthetic for their new master suite. “We changed the color scheme to a dusty blue with an almost nude-colored fabric to make it more feminine,” the designer notes. Watercolors on paper from the Paris Flea Market drive this point home, while a metallic wallcovering in the wife’s closet and a glittery black wallpaper in a powder room enhance the femininity in a way that’s refreshing, not overt.

Bearing in mind the durability required for a growing brood (the couple has since welcomed twins), Brown benched precious silks and fussy patterns in favor of relaxed, tactile textiles like elegantly rumpled indoor-outdoor linens, supple leathers, tightly woven chenille and cotton sateen.

Outside, dense surroundings by landscape architect Alec Michaelides shroud the house from the street, ensuring its owners never feel overexposed. “To reduce the visual impact of the first-floor height, we designed a raised planting area and a mid-level arrival terrace to the front door,” explains Michaelides. “It’s a more graceful approach to the house that doesn’t require scaling an entire flight of steps to reach it.” The plan also allowed room to accommodate a pair of mature crepe myrtles that forms a canopy over the property’s front walkway, visible from Benecki’s expansive windows and doors.

This was intended to be “a very sophisticated, private house,” Benecki affirms. What resulted was well beyond the bounds of the initial plans but feels like the intended destination in the end.

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A Design Team Marries Elegance, Livability In Arizona {A Design Team Marries Elegance, Livability In Arizona} – English

A Design Team Marries Elegance, Livability In Arizona {A Design Team Marries Elegance, Livability In Arizona} – English

The post A Design Team Marries Elegance, Livability In Arizona appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The house, built several years earlier by residential designer Gary Wyant, “was designed as a European-style retreat,” he says, adding that the original owners’ focus had been on entertaining. To that end, Wyant conceived an open floor plan that flowed easily to expansive patios and a serene garden created by landscape designer Jeff Berghoff. “The pocket doors, breaking the barrier between indoor and outdoor living, were a must for us,” afirms the wife. Adds the husband, “We knew upon the first viewing that the level of this home’s quality made it incomparable.”

The architectural proportions–large rooms, high ceilings–were the most critical factor in Kehoe’s design. “We had to get the scale right,” she explains. “It’s a pretty formal home, and I didn’t want to take away from that, but it needed to be livable. I wanted the furnishings to work with the architecture, not overpower it, so I toned them down with neutrals.” The couple’s previous house was a colorful Spanish adobe–“the polar opposite of this one,” says Kehoe–so they agreed to jettison their existing furnishings, including a hot-pink sofa, and follow the designer’s lead. “Bright colors wouldn’t have matched the sophistication of this grand house. We stuck with neutrals as a basis, adding reds and blues–classic American colors–because that felt appropriate.”

Since the couple was based on the East Coast and not available for frequent in-person meetings, Kehoe came up with turnkey options that helped them make decisions quickly. She started by repainting the rooms and adding new lighting and mirrors. When it came to the furnishings, she says, “I shopped independently and found great items locally, like the wood bench in the living room.” Ample wood pieces were used to create warmth throughout. “After we chose all the main pieces, we went back through to see what was missing and then layered in all the accessories.” The designer also opted for unfussy window treatments, explaining, “Traditional homes here are going cleaner now. It’s not about heavy, ornate fabrics anymore.”

Kehoe also encouraged the homeowners to showcase their personal interests through the design. They’re a horse-riding family, and, notes the wife, “We’d found the Drew Doggett Sable Island wild horse photographs we wanted to incorporate. We weren’t entirely certain where or how to do so. Laura worked that out for us, then suggested other ways to tie a subtle equestrian theme into the great room space.” Leather chairs, nail-head trim and woven blankets lend a subtle feeling of the Old West and infuse spaces with a sense of ease. “We wanted a home that felt cozy–with ourselves, our dog and our guests free to sit or lounge anywhere,” remarks the husband.

In a spacious guest bedroom, Kehoe again focused on scale. “It’s a long, rectangular room and we could ft a lot in,” she says. A pair of queen beds fill out the space while leaving plenty of room for pretty upholstered end benches and a leather club chair. While the prevailing palette here is neutral, through a coral and salmon carpet, Kehoe says, “We were able to get in a little of the wife’s favorite pink.”

Just outside the French doors is an enclosed patio with a table and chairs. “I love that there are private little areas all around the house,” Kehoe says. “The outdoor areas are charming. And the back patio, with its dining table and seating area by the fireplace, the pool and the outdoor kitchen, and those views of Camelback Mountain, is perfect for hosting holidays.”

“Laura achieved a rare combination of elegance and livability,” observes the wife. “She’s adept at listening and responded to the ethos we described wanting for our home. She has a wonderful designer’s eye–with wonderful ears to match.” With everything now pulled together, the husband adds, “We’re looking forward to making the house feel ‘lived in’ by actually doing so.

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A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility {A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility} – English

A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility {A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility} – English

The post A Cabin-Style Home Achieves Modern Sensibility appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The Bolins assembled a design team to make the dream a reality, and it was quickly determined that the home should be a reflection of the couple and the region itself. “They are super fun people,” says interior designer Barbara Glass Mullen. “While Aspen has a specific chichi vibe, the mid-valley–where Basalt is located–is more laid-back.”

Residential designer Richard Mullen created the getaway, dubbed Eagle Creek Ranch, with a traditional exterior that evokes the rustic buildings found at Roaring Fork Club and an interior with clean lines. “The clients wanted a mountain home but lightened up,” he explains. To that end, the team opted for elements such as plaster ceilings (as opposed to wood), light-hued beams (instead of the expected dark color) and wire-brushed, white-oak woodwork (in favor of wood with a knotty texture).

The home’s calming neutral palette is punctuated with shades of blue, one of Pat’s favorite colors. Reflecting the couple’s taste and lifestyle, Glass Mullen selected furnishings that are stylish yet comfortable and functional. Upholstered pieces, for example, have sophisticated lines but deep, soft seats and backs (and many are fronted by lounge-inducing ottomans). The interior designer also worked to add soul with special elements. “Barbara found some nice things for us, but she also mixed in antiques and pieces that came from Pat’s parents’ home,” Jane says, referencing artwork and rugs throughout the house and a small table in the master bedroom.

The light-filled interiors showcase the couple’s own art collection, including a painting commissioned by Theodore Waddell they acquired just for the home. “We had seen his work for years in Aspen galleries,” Pat says. “Once we built the bar in our great room, I thought a large Waddell would be beautiful there.”

An architectural piece of art is the structure’s elliptical staircase, which seems to float from floor to floor. “I wanted the handrail to be a continuous spiral that was not interrupted by newels or landings,” Mullen says. The signature element took six weeks to design, an aspect indicative of the craftsmanship employed throughout the residence, says general contractor Todd Cerrone. Another great example of sweating the details is found in the stonework, where each cut was made with care. “We didn’t want to see any straight lines in the stone, so the masons chipped every single edge with a hammer and chisel,” Cerrone says.

One of the challenges the team faced was how to make the home feel cozy for just Pat and Jane but expansive enough to fit their family when all are present. The answer was found in the arrangement of the rooms. The north-facing master bedroom aligns with the kitchen and great room, making an intimate suite-like space when it’s just the homeowners in residence. The three guest rooms–clustered on the east- facing side of the house–each have French doors opening to a porch and access to a shared family room. The layout allows for privacy and gathering, in equal measure.

“Every bedroom has its own story, which makes it kind of fun,” Jane says. A masculine bedroom, done in subtle purple, is a nod to the couple’s sons, whose alma mater is Texas Christian University, known for its purple Horned Frog mascot. Epitomizing the eclectic nature of the project, another bedroom contains romantic oral draperies as well as two contemporary blue side tables.

The exterior spaces are as important to the Bolins as the interior, hence a generous porch that’s the stuff of long, comfortable evenings spent in a rocking chair while appreciating the view. “They really wanted to enjoy the summers in Colorado, so everything was designed around the outdoor space,” Mullen says.

Landscape architect Richard Camp lent magic to the surrounding grounds, including adding an idyllic pond that seems to have existed on the site since 1895, when Basalt took its name from the rock formations on the mountains. “As you pass the pond, you continue around to the entry courtyard, where we saved a large stand of existing Aspen trees,” Camp says. Another stand of the trees is across the driveway, making for a picturesque grove that frames the entrance to the house.

Together, these features provide the Bolins with the indoor-outdoor experience they craved. “Pat has worked really hard all his life, and when we come here, within five minutes his blood pressure drops and he’s a whole new guy,” Jane says. “It’s an extremely beautiful, peaceful place to be.” Pat claims he still has to pinch himself to believe it’s real, saying: “It really is the home of our dreams.”

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Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal {Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal} – English

Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal {Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal} – English

The post Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The deal is being done through a special-purpose vehicle, or SPAC, which uses public market funds to buy private companies and take them public. It is the third such deal done through Mr. Palihapitiya’s Social Capital Hedosophia fund, after the real estate start-up Opendoor and the space tourism company Virgin Galactic.

 

Read the full story on The New York Times here.

The post Clover Health Is Acquired In A $3.7 Billion Deal appeared first on Wealth-X.

Former Bridgewater Co-CEO Settles Pay Dispute With Hedge Fund {Former Bridgewater Co-CEO Settles Pay Dispute With Hedge Fund} – English

Former Bridgewater Co-CEO Settles Pay Dispute With Hedge Fund {Former Bridgewater Co-CEO Settles Pay Dispute With Hedge Fund} – English

The post Former Bridgewater Co-CEO Settles Pay Dispute With Hedge Fund appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Ms. Murray had filed suit against Bridgewater in July, alleging it was withholding up to $100 million in deferred compensation because she disclosed to a third party that she had a gender-discrimination dispute with the hedge fund. The suit described Ms. Murray as having claims against Bridgewater “based on gender discrimination, unequal pay, and breach of contract.”

 

Read the full story on The Wall Street Journal here.

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