A Designer Returns To Refresh A Serene Palm Beach Retreat {A Designer Returns To Refresh A Serene Palm Beach Retreat} – English

A Designer Returns To Refresh A Serene Palm Beach Retreat {A Designer Returns To Refresh A Serene Palm Beach Retreat} – English

The post A Designer Returns To Refresh A Serene Palm Beach Retreat appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


This time, McMakin enlisted the help of her colleagues Cece Bowman and Leslie Gaudio to transform the interiors. And while Harold Smith previously served as lead architect on the residence, architects Peter Papadopoulos and Taylor Smith from his firm helmed the current renovation with original builder Gene Parker. “It was wonderful to construct the home for the previous owner and then come back years later to do a major renovation with a new interior design style,” Parker says.

The erstwhile owners favored strictly classic decor to showcase their fine silver and antique furniture collections, McMakin recalls. The new owners preferred refreshed spaces that would be airy, sophisticated and soothing. “What attracted this couple to this house was how well it was built,” the designer says. “They could appreciate very traditional appointments but also see they could make it more contemporary.”

The home called for a tranquil atmosphere, which influenced the design team’s decision to employ an elegant, island-inspired palette dominated by blue, beige, red and cream. “The directive we had was to make the house serene but with an eye to the fact it’s in the tropics,” McMakin explains. Hence, furnishings in texture-rich materials such as bamboo, glass, marble, rattan and woven cane are juxtaposed with subtly printed wall fabric in nearly every room. “In one of the bedrooms, the pattern on the wall is cane applied over upholstery, which gives it a cross-hatched look,” Bowman notes.

Willing to experiment with the design, the clients were interested in supporting local craftsmen–and several opportunities arose. “The owners fell in love with the wallpaper that was going to be put on the ceiling in the master bedroom, but the scale was incorrect,” McMakin says. “We hired a fabulous artist who created that paper by hand.” That same artist also produced the foyer’s trompe l’oeil paintings of tall, feathery green fronds in stately white and gold chinoiserie planters. And the master bathroom received its own custom touch via artistically etched glass shower doors that replicate the space’s pineapple-print wallpaper.

To take full advantage of the locale, the owners wanted an enhanced indoor-outdoor link. Papadopoulos and Smith installed a cantilevered balcony off the master bedroom, overlooking the rear yard, and reconfigured the family room to allow for the addition of large windows. “We were keen to bring in more natural light.” Smith says. “It was nice to improve that connection.” Other sight lines in the room were made possible thanks to a clever technical rearrangement. “We put the mechanical equipment, generator and air conditioning in one location at the back of the property, thereby allowing every window and door to open to a garden, a courtyard or the pool,” Papadopoulos says.

Yet the verdant grounds, conceived by landscape designer Keith Williams, are best appreciated on the loggia, an airy space showcasing a cypress wood ceiling and eye-catching tropical details. “It has applied molding in a fabulous pattern, lattice that’s been applied by hand on all the walls and wonderful cutouts, shapes and arches,” McMakin says. Williams devised additional new gathering spots near the rebuilt swimming pool, including a rear pergola, exterior seating and an outdoor shower. “We took over unused landscape space on the west side of the house to create great gardens with a fountain and a sitting area,” he explains.

After two decades, the home’s interiors may have evolved stylistically, but as four timeless pineapple lanterns at the entry clearly signify, a welcoming spirit still remains. “They’re a well-known symbol of hospitality,” McMakin notes. “It’s an indication this is a house owned by very nice people, and you’d be fortunate to be invited inside.”

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Who Can Resist That Charming London Look? A Houston Home Embraces Those City Chic Vibes {Who Can Resist That Charming London Look? A Houston Home Embraces Those City Chic Vibes} – English

Who Can Resist That Charming London Look? A Houston Home Embraces Those City Chic Vibes {Who Can Resist That Charming London Look? A Houston Home Embraces Those City Chic Vibes} – English

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Certain fashionable London neighborhoods are known for their iconic townhouses, each one distinguished by a signature lacquered front door—like the one belonging to the home of Hugh Grant’s character in Notting Hill. And it was exactly this kind of first impression a Houston couple had in mind for the renovation of their River Oaks home. “We wanted the look of a typical London row house with a black lacquered door and brass hardware,” says the wife, who also desired to bring a certain “city chic” sophistication to the interiors of their residence.

With three daughters who have attended English boarding school, the owners keep a mews house in London, where they honed some of their urban design sensibilities. So while the Houston home they purchased had the basics—a good layout, clean palette and hardwood floors—its casual ambience was hardly the right setting for the blend of transitional furnishings and contemporary art they envisioned. “It had a very informal cottage feel,” says designer Chandos Dodson Epley, who took immediate steps to plaster the walls in the main living areas and make other cosmetic changes, like adding new cabinet hardware and decorative lighting.

Having worked previously with the couple on a home in Colorado, Epley—collaborating with project manager Phil Hudson—came to this project with a huge head start. “I already knew she prefers neutrals and contemporary art, and that she did not want an overly trendy house,” says the designer. With that in mind, Epley scoured every floor of the D&D building in New York City before embarking on an equally thorough search of the city’s Upper East Side antique shops. Her Herculean efforts proved fruitful and she returned to Texas with an assemblage of items guaranteed to elevate and distinguish every room. A two-tone goatskin cocktail table, vintage French curved-back beech wood armchairs and a glass table with painted stacked bronze ball legs set the bar.

With a game plan in place, blue became the base note for the otherwise black, cream and taupe color palette. “Every shade of blue is represented,” notes the designer, referencing the navy velvet on the dining room chairs and media room sectional, a hand-painted cerulean and white wallpaper backing the bar, and a serene shade of gray-blue in the master suite. “Playing the intensity up and down gives it a rhythm but keeps the vocabulary of the house intact,” she adds.

Meanwhile, interjections of metal provide another cohesive layer. While Epley treaded lightly with subtle brass tips on the dining room chairs, and brass and shagreen side tables in the living room, she opted to go big with an Italian brass-and-glass chandelier in the master suite. “We didn’t want the room to read super feminine, so we brought in masculine lines with koa wood nightstands and the black dresser,” the designer explains. “And that stunning antique light fixture was the aha moment that helped it all come together.”

Statement-making lighting emerged as yet another theme in the form of a Sputnik chandelier here and glass orbs there, further elevating the already cosmopolitan interiors. With the help of builders Steve Goodchild and John Goodchild, a father-and-son team, new wall paneling and mirrored tiles were added in the dining room where the latter reflects the room’s Murano glass chandelier. The resulting light display transforms every gathering into a special occasion. “Finding that chandelier felt like kismet,” Epley says.

Mindful of the need for a contemporary edge to keep things fresh, the designer returned to New York City, this time with her client in tow, to make the art auction rounds. “We measured walls and went with an Excel spreadsheet in hand,” Epley says. Their efforts paid off in the form of Mark Flood’s modern work in the breakfast area and a David LaChapelle photo of fashion icons Alexander McQueen and Isabella Blow in a bedroom used by the couple’s fashion designer daughter. “Houses are not complete until there is art on the walls,” Epley notes. “A sofa is a sofa, but art is one unique piece that is just yours.”

The resulting mix of clean trimwork lines, soft upholstered pieces and edgy art checked every box on the clients’ wish list. “The house is perfect from both an aesthetic and functional standpoint,” says the wife. Epley concurs. “I think we nailed the London townhouse essence,” she says. “From the moment you walk through the lacquered front door, it’s a memorable experience.”

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Permission Granted To Embrace Your Playful Side At This Florida Keys Vacation Home {Permission Granted To Embrace Your Playful Side At This Florida Keys Vacation Home} – English

Permission Granted To Embrace Your Playful Side At This Florida Keys Vacation Home {Permission Granted To Embrace Your Playful Side At This Florida Keys Vacation Home} – English

The post Permission Granted To Embrace Your Playful Side At This Florida Keys Vacation Home appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


A bathroom table in the shape of a life-size sheep could be considered an unusual design choice—but designers James and Miriam Duncan knew it was exactly the kind of lighthearted eccentricity their clients wanted in their Key Largo, Florida, vacation home.

The owners, whose primary residence is in Canada, happily gave the husband-and-wife team complete creative freedom for the project. But there was a caveat: The result couldn’t be too precious. The Duncans could do whatever they wanted, so long as it was fresh, fun and a home that could be lived in.

Although the unit in the Ocean Reef Club didn’t require many structural changes, it was lacking a certain character. “We needed to give it a little bit of personality,” James Duncan says. “It had a lot of drywall and porcelain, so we wanted to warm it up and make it friendly.”

To add visual depth to the condo, general contractor Fabio Cisternino crafted wood moldings and customized natural wood shiplap for parts of the dwelling, such as the living area and hallways. “We tried to make it really fresh,” he says. “I like the combination of nice furniture and finishes with more rustic details. It’s sophisticated but also has warmth.”

The change established a backdrop for just the atmosphere the owners desired. “Being a vacation home, they wanted it to feel more casual,” Miriam Duncan says. “They want to be able to walk in with the sand on their feet and not worry about anything.” This meant choosing furniture and fabrics that resist the carefree holiday antics of the family’s several generations. “The clients have grandchildren, so we were looking for bulletproof finishes,” James Duncan says. To that end, the designers’ use of vinyl wallpaper in hallways as well as outdoor fabrics and rugs throughout mean the apartment is easy to clean up after a festive gathering. “The owners aren’t trying to impress people; they’re just trying to have a good time,” James Duncan says. “You don’t want a design to look straight out of the showroom—it should feel like a life, a collected story.”

Of course, a good vacation home is one that also conveys a sense of wanderlust. For that, the Duncans dug into their own collection of curios they have amassed from extensive global journeys, having dedicated two months a year to traveling. One hall displays wooden tribal masks from Mali and a sculpture from Papua New Guinea, the dining area has a console table from Vietnam, and the living area is furnished with antique chairs from Prague and smokestacks, once part of an old French ship, transformed into lights. “Good interiors are a bit of storytelling,” James Duncan says. “With our spaces, we try to make it feel like this is a home, a collection of experiences.”

Amid the international mix of findings, the Duncans made sure to also incorporate a local sense of place. In the bedrooms, they incorporated board and batten walls as a tribute to a signature building exterior in the Florida Keys. And unsurprisingly, there are plenty of references to the ocean, from a custom gold chrome surfboard in a bedroom to a driftwood console in a hallway and beachy fabrics throughout. Combined, the rustic, organic textures add an extra touch of soul, with just the right patina to look as though they’ve been lovingly weathered over the years by salty sea breezes.

The coastal vibe is deepened through the unit’s striking artworks. A dreamy abstract in soothing blues and grays sits above a weathered wooden bench in a hall, while large-scale photographs capture nautical vignettes: a majestic tricolor spinnaker blooming from a sailboat in a corridor; a seabird folding its elegant neck into its plumage in a hallway; a solitary white lifeguard stand surveying the azure waters in the master bathroom.

As for the sheep, Miriam Duncan says it is a testament to the homeowners’ easygoing spirit—and trust in the designers’ creative direction. “When you suggest a client have a sheep in their master bathroom to hold their soap, a lot of people would be very hesitant,” she laughs. “But if you have the freedom to just do it, then it’s a nice surprise and it’s playful.”

It’s exactly those design details with a twist that imbue the waterfront property with the kind of laid-back, cheerful vibe inherent to a good beachside getaway. “It feels very light and bright,” Miriam Duncan says. “You just want to be happy there.”

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European Regulator Says Boeing 737 Max Is Safe To Fly Again {European Regulator Says Boeing 737 Max Is Safe To Fly Again} – English

European Regulator Says Boeing 737 Max Is Safe To Fly Again {European Regulator Says Boeing 737 Max Is Safe To Fly Again} – English

The post European Regulator Says Boeing 737 Max Is Safe To Fly Again appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Since grounding the plane, Boeing has been working on a complete redesign of the plane’s flight software.

 

Read the full story on the Business Insider here.

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Global Asset Manager AUM Tops $100 Trillion For The First Time {Global Asset Manager AUM Tops $100 Trillion For The First Time} – English

Global Asset Manager AUM Tops $100 Trillion For The First Time {Global Asset Manager AUM Tops $100 Trillion For The First Time} – English

The post Global Asset Manager AUM Tops $100 Trillion For The First Time appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The research, conducted in conjunction with Pensions & Investments, a leading U.S. investment newspaper, confirms growing concentration among the top 20 managers whose market share increased during the period to 43% of total assets, up from 38% in 2000 and 29% in 1995. It also shows that, in the past decade, 232 asset manager names have dropped out of the ranking.

 

Read the full story on the Markets Insider here.

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Foreign Investors Pour $538 Million Into Indian Bonds In September {Foreign Investors Pour $538 Million Into Indian Bonds In September} – English

Foreign Investors Pour $538 Million Into Indian Bonds In September {Foreign Investors Pour $538 Million Into Indian Bonds In September} – English

The post Foreign Investors Pour $538 Million Into Indian Bonds In September appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

In September, foreign investors poured over $1 billion into Asian government and corporate bonds, more than doubling their investment in local currency debt from the previous month, attracted by higher yields and some signs of economic recovery. The inflows in September “could be a sign of foreign capital returning” to India, said Duncan Tan, a strategist at DBS Bank. He said India’s relatively high-yielding government debt had become attractive for foreigners with the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) reluctant to ease monetary policy further to avoid fuelling inflation.

 

Read the full story on Business Standard here.

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Fuhrman Family Office, Liontree Invest In Art Market Newsletter {Fuhrman Family Office, Liontree Invest In Art Market Newsletter} – English

Fuhrman Family Office, Liontree Invest In Art Market Newsletter {Fuhrman Family Office, Liontree Invest In Art Market Newsletter} – English

The post Fuhrman Family Office, Liontree Invest In Art Market Newsletter appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Josh Baer, an art dealer and adviser who started the publication in 1994 by sending news out by fax, declined to discuss terms, but described the investment as “significant.” A mix of personnel and market items, the newsletter counts billionaire collectors and mega-dealers among subscribers.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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Behind The Arizona Furniture Collection Inspired By The Sonoran Desert And Art Deco Period {Behind The Arizona Furniture Collection Inspired By The Sonoran Desert And Art Deco Period} – English

Behind The Arizona Furniture Collection Inspired By The Sonoran Desert And Art Deco Period {Behind The Arizona Furniture Collection Inspired By The Sonoran Desert And Art Deco Period} – English

The post Behind The Arizona Furniture Collection Inspired By The Sonoran Desert And Art Deco Period appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

McIntyre’s uniquely textured wooden furnishings complement white details in the wall frames, plant vase and side chairs to pack a punch in this living space.

The James McIntyre Collection owes its inspiration to several sources: The Art Deco period, which has enchanted Canadian-born interior designer McIntyre since he was a design student; contemporary design, with its streamlined aesthetic; and finally, the Sonoran Desert.

“I love the minimalism of it,” he explains. The result is a collection of chairs, sofas, tables, beds and consoles in materials like solid walnut, bronze, leather, velvet, antique brass and quartzite. McIntyre and his design partner, Ronald Bills, are already dreaming up the next editions with an eye toward classic Hollywood and modernism.

“If we’re going to do a collection, we have to stay true to our inspiration,” McIntyre contends.

PHOTO COURTESY LAURA MOSS PHOTOGRAPHY

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Inside A Stunning Charlotte Home With English Manor Hallmarks {Inside A Stunning Charlotte Home With English Manor Hallmarks} – English

Inside A Stunning Charlotte Home With English Manor Hallmarks {Inside A Stunning Charlotte Home With English Manor Hallmarks} – English

The post Inside A Stunning Charlotte Home With English Manor Hallmarks appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Smith’s method is a big reason Eydie and Blake Okland enlisted him to design their new home in Charlotte, North Carolina’s stately Tuckaway Park. “I think a lot of architects design what they like or want, but Frank really listened to what we wanted in a home and created it as such,” says Eydie. She and her husband requested something reminiscent of an old English manor–an homage to Blake’s British ancestry–but with a “timeless, modern” interior.

Teaming up with designer Kimberly Mauney, Smith took that request and ran with it; even the arches of the stair railing are a subtle nod to those found in English Gothic architecture. “But those English manor homes were designed for protection and were dark,” Smith explains. “This one is open and full of light.”

Having collaborated with Smith in the past–frequently specifying interior finishes for his North Carolina residences–Mauney had come to admire his big ideas and unorthodox process. “Frank really thinks in three dimensions,” says the designer, who joined the project by way of his recommendation. “The beauty of his residences is that they’re very well-thought-out designs where everything flows seamlessly.” For example, expansive windows along the front of the house align neatly with those in the back, resulting in views that go straight through the public spaces, past the glass railing of the bluestone loggia and to the golf course beyond. Says Smith: “It’s a completely see-through house.”

But the apparent simplicity of his design for the Oklands belies a more complex hidden layer. “What you don’t see are the many pathways that allow someone to slip from one room to another unnoticed,” explains Smith, who called on general contractor Bryan Gerrard to execute this maze of entryways. The result is a very human house; one that allows movement organically through the space and cleverly connects each room so that one never arrives at a dead end. Says Eydie: “There’s a continual flow, a somewhat figure-eight design.”

Mauney says the homeowners are among many recent clients to request multifunctional modern spaces. “A living room might become an office in the early morning because it’s where the sun rises and you can enjoy a cup of tea,” she explains. “I think the fluid floor plan allowed me to design in a way that allows the Oklands to use each room for various purposes.” She ensured the interiors felt as bright and airy as the architecture, using luxurious materials and a light hand. “Eydie has great taste. She knew what she wanted, whether it was dark sofas or a special wall treatment,” says the designer. “She also wanted to create a home that would take their daughters through their teenage years and into their adult lives and the expanding family dynamics that would come with weddings and grandbabies.”

Employing clean lines and a warm oyster color throughout allowed treasured artworks to serve as punctuation points and hits of saturated shades (sapphire, aubergine, powder blue) to have greater impact. The kitchen is one such space, where a butterfly-themed work by artist Caroline Boykin appears nearly ready to flutter off its pale backdrop.

For this room, the design team adapted the traditional fluted details of classical Roman columns, flattening them for a dimensional feature wall that smartly conceals the door to the scullery. A hinged window to the left of the range, cut out of the dramatically veined marble backsplash, is the sole indication this storage space exists. Mauney says the rest of the room was made to look and feel like a living area since, well, “everyone ends up in the kitchen.” Sans pendants to illuminate the honed Calacatta Gold marble countertops, it reads more like a gathering place that “just happens to be used for cooking,” the designer notes.

The success of the house is evident from the moment one pulls up to the circular drive–one of landscape architect Bruce Clodfelter’s elegant contributions. “It’s almost like a fishbowl effect,” Eydie says of the ability to look straight through the home to the golf course beyond. “That’s one of the things we love most–this house just flows.”

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An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views {An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views} – English

An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views {An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views} – English

The post An Aspen Home Showcases Bold Taste, Mountain Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The place the couple finally selected was one familiar to architect Charles Cunniffe. It was a log-and-timber dwelling with massive stone pillars and a sunken living room that left the jaw-dropping mountain scenery almost hidden. Cunniffe, who worked with senior project architect Rich Pavcek on the project, had already completed renderings for the previous owners, who contemplated modernizing the structure. So, when the architect got a second chance to make the dwelling live up to its potential, he jumped at it. “The early plans clued everyone into the new character the house could possess,” says Cunniffe. “As we worked on it this time around, we refined the details.” Those elements included raising the living room’s floor and adding larger windows. When the architect showed the couple the home’s ability to capture the landscape, they were sold on the concept. “I’m a big view guy,” says David. “I’ve never seen anything quite like this. You can see Independence Pass and all four ski mountains.”

Sterling McDavid, the couple’s daughter and designer, was a harder sell. Initially, her parents’ home of choice was shocking to her. “The house was not their taste in any way,” she says, noting their refined Texas residence stood in stark contrast to the rustic getaway with distressed finishes. But the opportunity to remake the home and maximize the scenery ultimately swayed her as well.

The designer’s vision included modernizing the interiors, finishes and architectural details. “My style is contemporary, so I pitched that to my parents,” says Sterling McDavid. “At first, my ideas were a little startling to them.” But the couple eventually embraced the aesthetics of the plan, albeit nervously at the outset. “I was apprehensive,” David laughs, “But we raised Sterling and she knows us and our taste, so I had enough confidence in her to take the plunge.”

In an unusual move, the renovation began by creating a basement. “The opportunity to fully excavate the lowest level was not capitalized on by the previous owners, but the idea really excited David,” says Cunniffe. Senior Project Manager Brian Hanlen, who worked in concert with principal Shane Evans on the construction, explains, “We dug underneath the existing house to make a full basement, and then went deeper by four feet so we could create higher ceilings.” The new space provides an additional 2,500 square feet that allows for a gym and an elegant spa, which the owners count as some of their favorite rooms in the home.

While the basement was expanded, the upstairs was opened, simplified and slimmed. The design team removed walls to make a modern flowing floor plan, jettisoning clunky logs and timbers, widening windows to take in said views and installing rift-sawn oak floors and ceilings for warmer notes.

Outside, the rough-hewn log exterior was reclad with crisp horizontal siding and stone veneer. The thick pillars were drastically thinned, and the multilevel patios beyond them were united and streamlined. “It’s now one contiguous patio on the vista side,” says Pavcek. “It takes advantage of views that weren’t visible before.”

When it came to color, Sterling McDavid selected hues that reference nature and showcase art. “Many of the shades used resemble a mountain cave,” she says, describing a largely neutral palette of grays, beiges and whites. The exception is her father’s study, which features pops of chartreuse that reference the golden Aspens and greens of the mountains. The walls are mostly white to display the notable modern artworks the designer helped her parents amass. “There’s no better way for art to stand out than to be placed on a white wall,” the designer observes. The collection started with some Andy Warhol snapshots of Aspen, one of which shows the airport David helped build. That led to other Warhol artworks (10 iconic Campbell’s Soup Cans now hang in the dining room), as well as works by Russell Young, Peter Lik and Brian Donnelly, professionally known as Kaws.

The art, the new look and the location all add up to something extraordinary. As Sterling McDavid says, “It is more than just a house. It’s a place built for two of Aspen’s biggest fans.” And how do the fans feel about it? In his colorful style, David sums it up as, “We’re as happy as birds in the sunshine.”

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