A Chicago Condo Pays Tribute To An Adventurous Spirit {A Chicago Condo Pays Tribute To An Adventurous Spirit} – English

A Chicago Condo Pays Tribute To An Adventurous Spirit {A Chicago Condo Pays Tribute To An Adventurous Spirit} – English

The post A Chicago Condo Pays Tribute To An Adventurous Spirit appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


A few things immediately stood out to the designer. Observing him, she noticed he was always in motion, so it was important that furnishings were able to “not only withstand his energy but encourage it,” she says. Adds Alex, “I’m a big pacer and rough on things.” Svenstrup also knew she had to acknowledge and celebrate her client’s passions, particularly mountaineering. Addressing his need for what they both cheekily call “an adult jungle gym,” the designer chose sturdy furnishings. “There is nothing fragile here,” she says. “I didn’t want him to be afraid of his home.” Her selections include a gnarled teak root coffee table (that’s strong enough to stand on) in the living room, a solid Chesterfield sofa, a generous Milo Baughman satellite chaise, and a curvy Pierre Paulin lounge chair. All upholstered in contract-grade fabrics, the blue on the Paulin and the purple on the chaise pay homage to two of Alex’s other great loves: the Cubs and Northwestern University.

For a client who admits he “likes to chill in weird ways,” Svenstrup took advantage of the window seats around the perimeter of the unit, making them into stylish perches. “There’s no point in sitting by the window when you can actually be in the window,” she points out. One of these spots even forms the seating area of an intimate dining space. “Alex was never into the idea of a dining table,” says the designer, “so I approached the room as one large great room. I wanted to provide the option of a dining area, but I didn’t want it to feel like one.”

Svenstrup cleverly wove in references to Alex’s life as a mountaineer in subtle and surprising ways. One of the first suggestions is a collection of nine 3D-printed sculptures just inside the main living area. On closer inspection, they represent the seven summits and North and South Poles that comprise the Explorers Grand Slam, which Alex just completed in June. Dark millwork meant to evoke the striations of a mountain in vertical form clads the wall housing the TV, and the hand-painted wallpaper on the ceiling suggests jagged peaks. A self-portrait of climber Cory Richards, shot just after he survived an avalanche, is a more explicit nod. “Alex wanted a monumental portrait that would encourage people to ask questions,” Svenstrup explains.

Alex’s demanding, risky pursuit informed Svenstrup’s approach to the bedroom. That’s where she hung certificates marking his accomplishments, so it’s a place for reflection–and a spot for him to recharge upon his return to sea level. “When I’m not on mountains, it’s hard to be home,” says Alex. “When I come back, it’s nice to go to a sanctuary where I can relax, but not be separate from the places I’ve been and the things I’ve done.” There, the designer hewed to a palette of grays infused with lush texture but eschewed the bold notes of color she used elsewhere. Instead, from the pewter-hued Venetian plaster on the walls to the perforated metallic draperies that allow in light but maintain privacy and the ruched charcoal fabric on the bed, the effect is soothing and cocoon-like.

Creating a home for an adventurer was an adventure in itself for Svenstrup. “I would dare to say it was the biggest one of my career,” she says. “He has been on a journey, and so have I.” And the final result isn’t just a home perfectly suited to Alex. The project allowed her to grow as a designer and businessperson. “I had his complete trust, and he embraced the design process, allowing me to curate his home,” she says. “I use him with other clients as an example of how I work and what happens when you’re on the same page.”

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A Denver Home Offers A New Spin On Midcentury Style {A Denver Home Offers A New Spin On Midcentury Style} – English

A Denver Home Offers A New Spin On Midcentury Style {A Denver Home Offers A New Spin On Midcentury Style} – English

The post A Denver Home Offers A New Spin On Midcentury Style appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


When the McCools hired designer Kim Layne to help update the vintage residence, they had no idea of the home’s history or its Hollywood connections. It was built by Marvin Davis, an oil mogul who once owned 20th Century Fox, Pebble Beach Resorts and the Beverly Hills Hotel, among other investments. Before moving to Los Angeles, Davis lived in the Denver house with his family.

For the design, Layne honored the home’s legacy while implementing the style her clients love. “We gave it a new life with a nod to the grand Hollywood Regency style Marvin established during his time here,” Layne says. “The home is still glamorous, but now with the clean, modern bent it was intended to have.” Jason agrees, adding, “We tried to walk a fine line between classy and comfortable.”

Inside, little was untouched, although the front closet with its 1970s wallpaper and green velvet-covered hanging rod remains just as it was in the Davis days. The parquet floor in the family room was also preserved and inspired the new, more clean-lined herringbone-wood floors elsewhere in the house. “Before, there was a lot of cream-and-beige marble everywhere,” says Layne. “We wanted to update things with new modern materials that make a similar impact.” These elements translate into a dramatic foyer with white Carrara marble and black Nero Marquina marble pieces cut into trapezoid shapes and laid to create a geometric, statement-making floor. Enhancing the impact is a round sofa with an animal print, black-lacquered chests and a contemporary crystal chandelier.

The marble floors–which begin with the black-and-white pattern in the foyer, then morph into oversize white squares in the rest of the home–proved tricky for general contractor Austin Schmidt. “We were trying to install almost 4,000 feet of marble tile and there were no level horizontal planes in the house,” he recalls. “We had to pour self-leveling concrete on two-thirds of the floor space, and then lay the stone.” Schmidt acknowledges other challenges as well, noting, “The way homes were built 50 years ago is so different from the way we build now.” He cites the master bathroom as a prime example. When constructed, this area was a warren of small, awkward spaces, including his-and-her bathing areas, three closets and a sauna. Layne reconfigured the space into one large room with a freestanding glass shower, but Schmidt says the complexity of the original layout required his team
to “reframe that area a couple of times.”

The home’s color palette was inspired by a pair of stained-glass sidelights that once flanked the front door. The glass elements were composed of vibrant shades of teal, gold and blue, and although they had to be removed to make way for a new steel-and-glass entry door, their colors live on throughout the house. “We used those shades as an inspiration to ground the palette in what the home had been,” Layne says. “Especially the teal element, which we wove through most of the rooms.” This hue appears in the elegant living room curtains, the library millwork and bookshelves, the velvet-covered dining room chairs and the family room’s barstools. The blue-green shades are frequently accented with notes of polished brass (as in the legs of the barstools).

Truer blue tones appear in the family room, where the designer selected an oversize semicircular sofa in a bright cobalt hue that seems to embrace the fireplace. The fireplace wall now has a new lease on life, thanks to the designer’s fresh take on classic midcentury materials. Granite replaces ledgestone tile on the horizontal fireplace surround, and the tall, vertical volume is reclad in limestone. Layne covered the wall above the mantel with contemporary wooden squares outlined in raw steel–a twist on classic wood paneling. Across the room, a 1960s-style console wears an of-the-moment gilded honeycomb print and is flanked by chairs
with a bold foo-dog pattern.

In the formal living room, Layne opted to reference the Hollywood Regency genre in a more direct way. The room’s paneled walls and niches are highlighted with shades of pale gray, cream and bright white, while the ceiling was painted a sky-blue hue. Low-backed sofas are upholstered in soft cream and teal shades, and the coffee table is crafted in a kidney shape. A California-cool note is struck with fine art photography showing The Beverly Hills Hotel, a pool in front of a midcentury house and a desert dotted with tall cacti.

Today, the McCools couldn’t be happier with their new home–so much so they are making the trek to Los Angeles less frequently. “We come here for the weekend, close the gate and never have to leave,” says Jason. “It’s a peaceful, modern retreat.”

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Sweeping Grasses Inform A Home’s Organic Design {Sweeping Grasses Inform A Home’s Organic Design} – English

Sweeping Grasses Inform A Home’s Organic Design {Sweeping Grasses Inform A Home’s Organic Design} – English

The post Sweeping Grasses Inform A Home’s Organic Design appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


It was a tone that would be under scrutiny, because neighbors, horseback riders and hikers had long treated the hillside as part of the adjacent regional park. “Seven houses looked across the open space to the ridge beyond, and we were putting a home in everyone’s foreground,” Feldman says, adding that public trails wrap around two sides of the property. Feldman and his clients agreed the house had to capture its wild, untouched surroundings. “They loved the idea of living in a glass house, but didn’t want to live in a fishbowl,” he adds.

Luckily, the contours of the land offered a solution, as it starts low near the neighboring houses and slopes up toward a gentle knoll by the trails. Feldman tucked the house into the hill just below its crest. The dark, low-slung structure recedes into the landscape, and its L-shape encloses a private courtyard with walls of glass facing the park, while the neighbor-facing sides have smaller openings that protect the family’s privacy. “Once we determined the siting and orientation of the main elements, the rest of the design and details were fairly obvious,” the architect says.

Landscape architect Ron Lutsko Jr. took over where the house left off, surrounding it with native plantings that further nestle it into the grassy hill. “There was hardly a tree there. It was this bald, open, Andrew Wyeth-like setting,” he says. “The project was all about appreciating that type of site.” Long, low concrete walls extend from the house to tie the dwelling into the distant scenery, and the landscape architect planted more of the native grasses close to the house. “You’re sitting in this wild California terrain that has not been altered,” Lutsko says, explaining that his goal was to make the house look like a spaceship had gently lowered it into an untouched landscape.

Designer Stephanie Zaharias, a longtime friend of the wife, responded to Feldman’s streamlined architecture with a restrained interior palette of mostly black and gray. “Jonathan’s design of this house is beautiful, and I was consciously trying to make it not appear ‘designer-y,’ ” Zaharias says, adding that her client eschews decorative flourishes. “I was there to interpret her style, which is clean, minimalist and organic. She didn’t want something slick or high-gloss.” Another priority: Blurring the division between inside and outside spaces. Ebony-stained cedar, for example, travels from the exterior cladding to the interior walls, while dark wenge benches flow in and out from the foyer and living room. “We went to great effort to incorporate the exterior and interior materials in this house,” she says.

The designer notes that the fusion of inside and out is an important mandate, given there are so many large windows and glass doors here. “We actually built the building to fit the windows,” general contractor Kyle Mortz says. “There’s a good amount of structural steel to create a vision of all glass and keep that feeling of a solid, rigid building.”

Though a black house with concrete floors and patios might seem uninviting, the owner says the opposite is true, thanks to the large expanses of glass. “It doesn’t feel at all dark or oppressive. All you see is light,” she says. That’s because the dark-framed windows recede from the bright landscape, says Feldman, adding the surrounding hills are so vibrant, it allows the muted interior to enhance their beauty. “There was a lot of discussion about how you don’t need a lot of art in this house, because the art is in the views. Everything lines up around the windows.”

There’s one space that asserts itself with color, a family nexus for work, games and crafting they call “the lab.” Zaharias celebrated the creative pursuits of her clients and their two teenage daughters with pops of blue and yellow that energize the space. “We didn’t want it all to be muted and minimal,” says Zaharias, who notes that the yellows in particular echo the flowering plants Lutsko incorporated around the home’s perimeter.

In the end, the architect relates that the community board quickly approved his design for this house, which hews so closely to the land–and even defended it to skeptical neighbors because it blends so well into the larger panorama. The clients, who wished to live in a glass house, feel both part of and protected from the view. Although they see the occasional dog or horse loose on the property, it’s not a problem. As the wife says, “It’s minor compared to the upsides of living out here.”

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An Arizona Home Remodel Obtains An Organic Edge {An Arizona Home Remodel Obtains An Organic Edge} – English

An Arizona Home Remodel Obtains An Organic Edge {An Arizona Home Remodel Obtains An Organic Edge} – English

The post An Arizona Home Remodel Obtains An Organic Edge appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The clients, a Chicago-based couple looking to unwind, acquired the property just two years after it was built. “The architecture was beautiful, but the house came fully furnished, and it wasn’t to my taste,” the wife says, recalling the mustard yellow faux-finished walls, heavy brown leather and a surfeit of architectural ornamentation.

The couple’s design brief was simple: “They wanted clean lines and a more open, contemporary look,” Martin says. The wife, who studied architecture and design in college, raised the bar with her request for vivid color. “I know John tends toward a neutral palette,” she says, “and I definitely challenged him with brightening things up.” Known for his use of black and white, Martin confesses, “I had no idea where the color would come from at that point, but then it hit me–artworks would be the color.” Did the homeowners’ nonexistent art collection phase him?

Not one bit. An artist himself, whose work can often be found in his clients’ interiors, he curated a custom collection of pieces with intense paint-box hues that pop against the home’s foundational color theme of gray, white and black.

To prime his canvas, so to speak, Martin painted every room a soft matte white and exchanged the residence’s Tuscan-style fixtures for custom lighting with simple geometry, such as the contemporary metal-and-organza chandelier in the living room. “I knew I’d have to bridge several styles in this home,” he says. The existing flooring–taupe travertine and dark-stained walnut–was already a nice neutral shade to showcase the unexpected accents he had in mind, such as century-old cactus skeletons for the entryway arches. “I bought them from an antique dealer in San Francisco, of all places,” the interior designer says with a laugh. “I guess you could say they’ve returned to their native land.”

Nearby, earth tones prevail in the spacious living room, which Martin layered with a muted flokati rug, swivel armchairs in granite-colored linen and a low-slung sofa in white cotton that lends intimacy to the space’s grand proportions. On both sides of the fireplace, now framed by a simplified archway, paintings appear to float on smokygray mirror glass. “We didn’t see the art until the big reveal,” the wife says, “and when we walked in, it was spectacular.” The room also contains many furnishings of Martin’s own design, including leather stools and a sleek oak-and-steel bar cabinet that replaces a traditional corner bar. “It doesn’t scream ‘bar’ now,” Martin says, adding that it cues up the mix of warm wood and metal in the open kitchen.

The kitchen might be the most luxurious room in the house, according to Martin. He kept the space’s original layout but changed every surface and appliance with the help of general contractor John Malone. The wife marvels at Martin’s strategy. “John’s amazing, because he doesn’t have to rip everything out to make a statement,” she says. For example, the interior designer created strong focal points by choosing glossy black tile for the backsplash and painting sections of existing off-white cabinetry a luscious shade of black. On the cooktop and cabinet above the sink, a rough-hewn teak ladder from Bali finds new life as decorative trim–a typical Martin touch.

Bold black-and-white contrast continues in the master suite with one of several abstract canvases Martin commissioned from artist David Dauncey. “I wanted it to evoke a modern Native American blanket motif,” he says, explaining the piece subtly honors the home’s southwest surroundings. He also cleverly sliced an antique Chinese game table in half to create nightstands–“They fit perfectly,” he declares–and made the centerpiece of the master bathroom a theatrical backlit screen made of antique air vents from India.

Equally important were the changes to the exterior spaces, such as the striking desert garden envisioned by landscape designer Jared Morris and later enhanced by landscape designer Chad Norris. Outdoor features include a custom fire pit by the interior designers, stonework around the pool and a chic pool-house bathroom–the original request that launched the renovation. Altogether, the adjustments have made the house an idyll of indoor-outdoor entertaining. “We’ve been living with the new design for a while now,” the wife says, “and every day I still notice something new.”

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Uber Sued For Failing To Outfit Scooters With Turn Signals {Uber Sued For Failing To Outfit Scooters With Turn Signals} – English

Uber Sued For Failing To Outfit Scooters With Turn Signals {Uber Sued For Failing To Outfit Scooters With Turn Signals} – English

The post Uber Sued For Failing To Outfit Scooters With Turn Signals appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Erin Norman’s lawsuit also takes aim at the makers of the scooters, who she says designed them for use on city streets, where signaling is required, yet failed to provide “any device or mechanism to safety signal a turn.”

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan {M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan} – English

M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan {M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan} – English

The post M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The latest move makes M1 the third mobile network operator to offer non-standalone 5G in Singapore, after StarHub in mid-August and Singtel earlier this month.

 

Read the full story on Straits Times here.

The post M1 Launches Non-Standalone 5G Mobile Plan appeared first on Wealth-X.

Australia Banks Surge As Lending Laws Eased To Boost Economy {Australia Banks Surge As Lending Laws Eased To Boost Economy} – English

Australia Banks Surge As Lending Laws Eased To Boost Economy {Australia Banks Surge As Lending Laws Eased To Boost Economy} – English

The post Australia Banks Surge As Lending Laws Eased To Boost Economy appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

As part of a sweeping overhaul of so-called responsible lending obligations, the government will allow banks to rely on income and spending information provided by borrowers when assessing loan applications, rather than doing their own lengthy verifications, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said Friday.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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A New Era Of Media Begins With Tokenization {A New Era Of Media Begins With Tokenization} – English

A New Era Of Media Begins With Tokenization {A New Era Of Media Begins With Tokenization} – English

The post A New Era Of Media Begins With Tokenization appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The solution, according to various media innovation prognosticators, is the “passion economy.” The argument goes that, since anyone can create content now, it follows that the lumbering media institutions of the past will be unbundled and replaced with a swarm of individuals: Smart, sharp, upstart newsletter writers, podcasters and maybe even TikTokkers. Substack will save us… hopefully.

 

Read the full story on Coindesk here.

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A Portland Penthouse Is Reimagined With Warm Neutrals {A Portland Penthouse Is Reimagined With Warm Neutrals} – English

A Portland Penthouse Is Reimagined With Warm Neutrals {A Portland Penthouse Is Reimagined With Warm Neutrals} – English

The post A Portland Penthouse Is Reimagined With Warm Neutrals appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


“They’d been living there for about a year when we were brought in,” Brandt recalls. “They had some great pieces as well as some intriguing art, but there was no continuity. The place felt a little lifeless.” Adds Chelsea, “We listened to Barnes speak about the space and the furnishings, and it became clear that it needed more than a refresh.” They walked through the condo, sizing up the layout as well as the Ellises’ furniture. “Each piece was either too large, too tall, too complicated or had too many individual elements for a place with commanding views,” says Chelsea. “And although everything was neutral in tone, the colors clashed.” One room “mostly” worked: the master bedroom, which the owners had updated with a walnut-paneled wall.

To create the modern and inviting interior Barnes and Koi wanted, the designers took their cue from the architecture and the view. (The Kaemingks work closely on every job, with Brandt taking on the overall concept and handling the design of architectural details and custom pieces, while Chelsea sees to elements like color, surfaces, furnishings and fixtures.) In the living room, they introduced sculptural furnishings that are low in profile, adding interest with texture and natural materials such as steel, wood–walnut, in particular, to tie in with the paneled wall in the master–and stone. Covered in a sand-colored velvet, the modular sofa is an example. Its curvy, organic form is complemented by the pieces around it: a round coffee table with a smoky glass top on a marble base; blackened steel and marble floor lamps; a wood-framed lounge chair. The designers also reworked the fireplace, resurfacing it in blackened steel.

The living room’s tone-on-tone palette continues in the adjoining dining area, replete with clean-lined furniture and a large Eric Blum painting that the designers commissioned. “It’s practically the only color used other than neutrals throughout,” shares Brandt. “We loved the soft, organic nature of his work and thought it fit in beautifully with the design of the dining area, which can be viewed from the living room and kitchen.” The Blum work joins the Ellises’ collection of contemporary art by the likes of Udo Noger, Lee Kelly and Kristy Kun. “Art is subjective, and it’s not always easy to shop for someone else,” says Chelsea. “But Barnes and Koi were open to suggestions.” Adds Barnes: “We exchanged a lot of emails and photographs about various artists we liked, works we already owned and ideas for the space. It was a fun process.”

What was formerly a diminutive office was reframed as a reading room, with wraparound slatted-oak paneling and a settee flanked by French pole sconces. The designers finished the space with a custom credenza that fits snugly against one wall and a cylindrical ottoman that echoes the lines of the settee. “I wasn’t sure how the paneling would turn out,” Barnes admits, “but it’s now one of my favorite rooms. It’s intimate yet elegant, with a striking view of the river and the Fremont Bridge.”

Both the clients and designers agreed that the master bedroom was nearly there–it just needed some personality. “We felt that some editing and supplementing would make it shine,” says Chelsea. To balance the walnut paneling, Brandt designed a floating eight-foot walnut credenza with a dark soapstone top for the opposite wall. Above it, the designers hung a large, starkly abstract Noger work that had once occupied the dining room. The juxtaposition of the Noger and the credenza create the contrast that the designers believe is essential to any successful interior and one of many moments they devised throughout. “Although the resulting spaces have a light, soft, airy feel about them, we felt it necessary to add that tension with harder, almost commanding materials,” says Brandt. “Every material has a role to play in a space and when paired right, they can create harmony in the big picture.”

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Earthy Materials Warm A Coconut Grove High-Rise {Earthy Materials Warm A Coconut Grove High-Rise} – English

Earthy Materials Warm A Coconut Grove High-Rise {Earthy Materials Warm A Coconut Grove High-Rise} – English

The post Earthy Materials Warm A Coconut Grove High-Rise appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The owners bought the residence before the building was erected and called upon Chicharo to review floor plans, which she modified for the family’s needs–creating six bedrooms instead of five, for instance. Even so, when the build-out was done, she recalls, “The owners didn’t like the finishes other than the marble in the master bathroom.” So the transformation continued, leading to an expansive space that achieves a sense of chic coziness through earthy tones and natural materials.

The first thing to go was the plaster wall that enclosed the large entry hall. “The space was square and very bare, and we didn’t need such a big hall,” Chicharo explains. “I wanted to bring in light so it felt comfortable, not like you’re in a box.” She reduced the square footage of the space by one-third, thereby enlarging the nearby living area, and replaced the barrier with gracefully curved translucent glass balanced by touches of walnut. “I love mixing materials and combining handcrafted work with industrial work,” the designer says. General contractor Carlos Cortes and his brother, builder Juan Cortes, fabricated a walnut front door and installed walnut paneling in the living area, connecting it to a marble wall. “Ensuring the glass, walnut and marble all joined smoothly and seamlessly was a challenge,” Carlos says. The paneling, while adding warmth, also cleverly disguises a door to the master suite, offering form and function.

More wood appears underfoot via herringbone flooring the brothers meticulously installed throughout the apartment, ensuring the design flowed easily–“especially where rooms meet,” Juan notes. The pattern was essential to add detail to the open-plan areas, Chicharo says. “If we had something interesting on the floor, then rugs could anchor individual spaces,” she explains.

The designer’s strategy is evident in the airy living area, which is divided in two: an entertainment space marked by a brown leather sectional atop a gray rug near the walnut paneling, and a sitting area defined by a blue rug that matches the adjacent wall color. In both spaces, Chicharo mixed in various textures, including a cowhide-upholstered sofa, leather pillows, a glass-and-metal coffee table, an oak bench and a chandelier made of steel cables that resembles a delicate mesh net. Between the two, she created an intimate dining area using a round ceramic table surrounded by steel-and-leather chairs.

Mixed materials even show up in the clients’ art collection, which features works by prominent Brazilian and Portuguese artists. A hallway displays a sculpture made of cherrywood veneer and bronze wire by Frida Baranek as well as a colorful painting of horizontal stripes by Jose Loureiro. One of Abraham Palatnik’s geometric paintings decorates the blue wall in the sitting area, while bedrooms show off various works such as a Gray Malin photograph and an ink-on-paper piece by Manoel Novello.

Greenery serves as the prominent art piece in the white marble master bathroom, where Ana Roma of Ana Roma Floral Design created a stunning floor-to-ceiling garden wall next to the shower. And the highlight of the serene gray-and-white master bedroom is a raised X pattern Chicharo created on the walls using painted wood, introducing shadows and interest. “I love to use wallpaper with texture on walls,” she says. “It warms spaces and creates subtle contrast.” The master suite connects to a large terrace, which the designer partitioned into a private area for the couple and a social spot outfitted with a durable sofa, chairs and coffee tables.

Despite its substantial size, the residence maintains an intimate feeling through its collection of eclectic materials and earthy tones–an extreme departure from its origins. “This apartment was white and huge,” Chicharo recalls. “I tried to create sensations that make people feel good, rather than lost in a vast space.”

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