Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views {Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views} – English

Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views {Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views} – English

The post Elegant Chicago High-Rise Condo Takes Its Cue From Its Stunning Views appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


The clients had secured a space in a new high-rise, but they soon realized something wasn’t quite right. Partially built out with an emphasis on individual rooms, “The unit was more traditional,” Shafer reports. “They didn’t want to feel boxed in.” Starting from scratch, they took another unit in the building—this time completely unfinished. The switch meant the team could think in terms of an open plan and, of course, the views, which, says the architect, “We used as the engine that drove everything.”

While Shafer and the homeowners embraced an open, light-filled concept, “We didn’t want a one-liner,” the architect says. So he devised a tightly controlled entry sequence to introduce the vistas capturing downtown and the lake. The elevator leads to a jewel box of a foyer and, from there, to the front doors. “Once you open them, there’s a screen wall that serves as the spine of the apartment and makes you contemplate your next move,” explains Shafer. “It’s mysterious and beautiful.” Comprised of vertical wood pickets, the structure creates a peekaboo effect, offering up slivers of the view until the dramatic window wall is fully revealed.

Making that move “was a real trick,” notes Shafer, who worked with builder Ryan Quid. “We had to make sure wherever you were you’d have long vistas through the unit.” His plan allows one to circumnavigate the apartment 270 degrees around the perimeter so that no one feels trapped in a room. It is, however, openness within reason. “With a simple close of a door, the homeowners can shut down the unit,” he notes, thanks to a layered program where public spaces give way to more transitional, semi-public spaces and then the bedrooms.

When it came to the interior design, the husband presented Riker, Dolenc and project lead Erin Humphrey with three words they wished their home to convey: warm, welcoming and timeless. “They were receptive to ideas, and that led down a path of newness,” says Riker. “They wanted modern, but not super trendy.” Adds Humphrey, “We didn’t choose anything that would date itself.”

With those watchwords in mind, the designers opted for furnishings that had classic, crisp profiles but also a subtle flair. Chairs by the wine room have a familiar club feel but stand on bases with brass-toned legs near a cabinet with eglomise door fronts, while the sofa in the family room balances on a chrome base. In the living room, a pair of chairs hints at a klismos form, but overstuffed profiles lend them a funky twist. And the homeowners did bring a few family favorites into their new digs, like a Philip and Kelvin LaVerne coffee table and a pair of Platner chairs. “The wife likes pieces with heritage,” notes Riker, “and we embraced that.”

The designers favored neutral hues with the occasional dash of blue, taking a cues from the sky outside and the Michiko Itatani painting in the living room. Along with the artwork, the team relied on finishes and lighting to serve up big textural and visual moves. They begin in the elevator lobby, which is papered with a scenic de Gournay print and features a book-matched marble floor. Nearby, Riker and company finished a plaster gallery wall for richness. And, knowing that the layout of the living and dining areas couldn’t support a chandelier over the dining table, the team instead centered a fixture over the living area’s coffee table. “It’s quiet but dramatic,” says Riker, “and doesn’t interfere with the art or the views.”

The team upped the ante with yet another touch: a NanaWall that opens up the kitchen to the terrace. “It feels less like apartment living because it affords the ease of going outside,” notes Riker. “It creates a break-out-of-the box feeling.” Which, one could say, is more necessary now than ever before. The flexible layout and nearly panoramic views make for an ideal home during times of quarantine. “Everyone has a place here,” says Riker, adding with a laugh, “so they’re not driving each other crazy.”

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The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life {The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life} – English

The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life {The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life} – English

The post The New Palm Beach Resort Making Wellness A Way Of Life appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.

If you’re looking to rejuvenate in the new year—and who isn’t?—head to wellness mecca Amrit Ocean Resort & Residences on Palm Beach’s swoon-worthy Singer Island. Set to open in March, Amrit spans more than seven beachfront acres and offers a mix of residences and resort guest rooms between two sleek towers aptly named Peace and Happiness.

A stone moon gate flanked by urns overflowing with water and illuminated by fire makes for a dramatic entry to the property, while inside textured patterns inspired by sand dollars, sea urchins and driftwood reflect the feel and colors of the ocean. “A key feature of the lobby is the spiral grand staircase inspired by the shape of a seashell,” says Mauricio Salcedo, principal at Bilkey Llinas Design.

Guests and residents can expect cutting-edge, individually customized programming that marries Eastern well-being philosophies with Western technology (think everything from acupuncture to sound and light therapies) while enjoying a sculpture garden, a 40,000-square-foot Ayush hydrothermal therapy experience for alternating between hot and cold pools and a salt chamber, and a plant-centric spa restaurant.

PHOTO COURTESY AMRIT RESORT & RESIDENCES

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When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges {When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges} – English

When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges {When A Chicago Designer Is Inspired By His Stylish Client, Unforgettable Design Emerges} – English

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It’s a style that his client developed as she built a career that sent her all over the world. Now, however, she was ready to focus not on jet setting, but on creating her dream home. Melott, with his distinct brand of eclectic chic, was just the man to help her conceive that home from scratch. “We’re accustomed to blank canvases,” says the designer. “We enjoy creating a curated story.”

A first matter of business was re-instilling character in the historic dwelling. Originally a single-family residence, the structure had at one point been converted to individual apartments, and later, back to a single-family home with basic finishes. Over these iterations, anything original had been replaced with drywall. For the designer, who describes himself as “not a restoration-guy” and instead “a nod-to-history-guy,” the idea was to bring in an air of patina, as opposed to recreating the home’s provenance as it were. “People don’t necessarily wear vintage clothing, but they’ll wear something emblematic,” he says. Led by this approach, Melott embarked on a renovation alongside general contractor Steve Gonczi.

As a starting point, layers were added to the home’s simple moldings as “a forward-looking take on ornate,” Melott says. To distinguish the foyer, he replaced standard-issue doors with antique wooden pocket doors found in New Orleans and swathed the walls in a rich coat of chocolate brown to strike a traditional chord. Envisioning the original turn-of-the-century layout prompted such additions as the custom-molded honed Nero Marquina marble fireplace surround and airy takes on classical built-in bookshelves, which Melott designed with local fabricator Joel Fisher of Lazuli Studios.

A radical character transformation took place with the high-octane kitchen, which was inspired by the client’s fashion sense. Taking cues from her closet, Melott replaced the existing white Shaker-style cupboards with a glossy black design, which opens onto equally swank living spaces. At the adjacent dining table, chairs with leather stitching pay homage to the client’s love of Chanel, while subtler sartorial strokes continue in the nearby drinks area. There, the sinuous shapes of two creamy velvet club chairs play to the feminine curves of the new fireplace.

As a self-made executive who grew up in a family of tradesmen and tradeswomen, another high priority for the client was championing local talents. “The idea of having things made by passionate, local hands felt right for my home,” she explains. “There’s the piece of supporting families in the community, but there’s also the matter of sustainability and doing right by the environment.” Melott responded enthusiastically, hitting the town for vintage pieces, peppering in contemporary furnishings and lighting, and finalizing the details with a chorus of local ceramicists, painters and makers. “Ninety-nice percent of the art in this home is local,” he confirms.

As with all great design, here, aspiration merges with function, pretty with practical.Upholstery fabrics chosen for their high durability score and a lack of rugs throughout cater to the client’s two cats, while amenities like personalized lighting solutions and discreet charging ports make working from the home’s many comfortable perches a breeze, especially in the COVID-19 landscape.

“Everything we do is a reflection of the people we do it for,” Melott says—a philosophy carried through from initial sit-down to final flourish. Case in point: Over one margarita-fueled meeting, the client shared that her grandmother—who had 10 children and never finished high school—avidly read National Geographic. When she walked into her newly designed home, the client found a tidy stack of antique issues sourced from near and far. “He brought me gorgeous, high design, but somehow, he brought my roots to me, too,” the client shares. At the walk-though, she adds, “I felt like I was walking into my house, my parents’ house, my grandparents’ house. It was the most unbelievable feeling of coming home.”

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Blackstone Tweaks Conditions For $6 Billion Crown Resorts Buyout {Blackstone Tweaks Conditions For $6 Billion Crown Resorts Buyout} – English

Blackstone Tweaks Conditions For $6 Billion Crown Resorts Buyout {Blackstone Tweaks Conditions For $6 Billion Crown Resorts Buyout} – English

The post Blackstone Tweaks Conditions For $6 Billion Crown Resorts Buyout appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Crown has already been found to be unfit to hold a gambling licence for its Sydney casino due to alleged links to organised crime, and faces quasi-judicial public inquiries into its operations in Victoria and Western Australia (WA), the two other states where it operates.

 

Read the full story on Reuters here.

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NYC Tycoon Secures $6 Billion In Gold To Back New Cryptocurrency {NYC Tycoon Secures $6 Billion In Gold To Back New Cryptocurrency} – English

NYC Tycoon Secures $6 Billion In Gold To Back New Cryptocurrency {NYC Tycoon Secures $6 Billion In Gold To Back New Cryptocurrency} – English

The post NYC Tycoon Secures $6 Billion In Gold To Back New Cryptocurrency appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

The value of the digital token, DIGau, will be pegged to the market price of the precious metal, guaranteed by liens Swig and partner Stephen Braverman’s company, Dignity Gold, secured against mining claims in Nevada and Arizona.

 

Read the full story on Bloomberg here.

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US Postal Service Plans To Support Postage NFT Tokens {US Postal Service Plans To Support Postage NFT Tokens} – English

US Postal Service Plans To Support Postage NFT Tokens {US Postal Service Plans To Support Postage NFT Tokens} – English

The post US Postal Service Plans To Support Postage NFT Tokens appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

In an announcement on Tuesday, communications-as-a-service platform CaseMail said the USPS had certified its postage nonfungible tokens, or NFTs, for use in the United States. The tokens are digitally stamped on the USPS’ ePostage labels and the physical item being mailed, creating a verifiable chain of custody for digital and physical assets, as all data is recorded on the blockchain.

 

Read the full story on Cointelegraph here.

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Dubai Stays Top Foreign Direct Investment Destination {Dubai Stays Top Foreign Direct Investment Destination} – English

Dubai Stays Top Foreign Direct Investment Destination {Dubai Stays Top Foreign Direct Investment Destination} – English

The post Dubai Stays Top Foreign Direct Investment Destination appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Dubai ranks first in the Middle East and North Africa region and fourth globally as a magnet for greenfield FDI capital, according to the Financial Times’ fDi Markets, the leading global source of data on greenfield FDI.

 

Read the full story on the Khaleej Times here.

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Machine Learning To Anticipate What The Brain Thinks {Machine Learning To Anticipate What The Brain Thinks} – English

Machine Learning To Anticipate What The Brain Thinks {Machine Learning To Anticipate What The Brain Thinks} – English

The post Machine Learning To Anticipate What The Brain Thinks appeared first on Wealth-X.


 

Brain-machine interfaces – or brain-computer interfaces, the terms are used interchangeably – are technologies designed to directly ‘‘plug’ into the nervous system: the brain, retinas in the eyes (which are actually a part of the brain itself), spinal cord, or peripheral nervous system. The Neuralink example and other similar technologies are designed to read and decode neural signals from individual neurons in selected parts of the brain to understand the brain’s outputs. Instead of the outputs going to the arm of a monkey or human controlling a joystick to play Pong or some other video game, they go to a computer which plays the game instead.

 

Read the full story on Forbes here.

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A Modern Napa Farmhouse Beckons Friends To Gather {A Modern Napa Farmhouse Beckons Friends To Gather} – English

A Modern Napa Farmhouse Beckons Friends To Gather {A Modern Napa Farmhouse Beckons Friends To Gather} – English

The post A Modern Napa Farmhouse Beckons Friends To Gather appeared first on Luxe Interiors + Design.


Shawback’s son and business partner, Damon Savoia, helped the clients find the land, which had good karma from the start. As the wife says, “It’s surrounded by trees that have been here for hundreds of years, and when you set foot on the property, you instantly feel grounded and relaxed.” Yet at first, the built environment was not as remarkable. The only structure on the property was an old barn that, while beyond repair, was filled with inspiration. It was the muse for a new barn built for guests and entertaining, and that aesthetic continued to the main home, which was created as a modern version of a traditional farmhouse. “The design was born out of extending the heritage of the site,” says Jess Field who, with his father, designed the compound within one of the valley’s oldest zinfandel vineyards. “It’s hard to talk about the house without talking about the land. We worked rigorously to eliminate boundaries and make the buildings feel like they are part of the place.”

The Fields coordinated with landscape architect Roderick Wyllie and his team so the home’s enclosed breezeways and strategically placed windows would perfectly frame the landscape. “There was a lot of thought given to how close we could get the buildings to the vineyards, and how they would open up to the landscape. We wanted the residents to feel like they are sitting in the vineyards, even when they are sitting inside,” says Wyllie, who also designed an infinity pool and the surrounding terraces. The water anchors the main patio and, since it captures images of the surrounding mountains on its surface, it is a reflecting pool as well as a place for recreation.

Building the house and barn required a small army of craftspeople. “It is some of the most amazing carpentry I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been doing this for 30-plus years. It’s flawless,” says general contractor Paul Niles, whose firm collaborated with Spearhead Inc. in British Columbia to mill all the structural beams and columns.

Meanwhile, for the color palette, Shawback looked to the wife’s personal style to select materials and finishes for the house and barn. “She prefers blues, grays and shades of lavender,” explains the designer, who worked with the entire team to make sure those hues flow inside and out–from the wood siding to the kitchen cabinetry; from the stone terrace to the concrete floors; and from the flower beds to the furnishings.

Shawback also enlisted top artisans to fabricate the furniture, such as the master bed and the barn’s huge central dining table. Savoia and his wife, Julie, who is also a designer, collaborated with Will Kavish and Nicole Cornell in Brooklyn to create a cascading light fixture in the barn, which is meant to echo the nighttime constellations that glow over the valley. The team also designed pendants over the dining table in the main house with the help of San Francisco artist Windy Chien, who tied and draped the knotted rope that anchors the blown-glass globes. “My favorite homes are the ones where everyone involved has such talent,” Shawback notes.

After three weeks of installing the decor, the designers hosted a Champagne-lunch reveal for the clients, collaborators and their families. “It’s a nice way to celebrate turning a house over to the owners–and it’s very emotional. There are happy tears!” Shawback says. The residence came together just in time for the couple to launch their own party a day later, hosting dozens of friends and family members for the Fourth of July holiday. The memories made that weekend include poolside lounging, shared meals and nighttime dance parties in the barn. As the wife says, “There were so many moments when I was seeing our vision become a reality.”

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For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning {For A Denver Family, An Arts And Crafts-Inspired Home Represents A New Beginning} – English

Sometimes a fresh start is exactly what’s needed. That was the conclusion of a young Denver couple after years of maintaining an older dwelling in the Washington Park neighborhood left them desiring more ease at home. By sheer coincidence, a new house was being built nearby and the idea of a move that didn’t mean saying goodbye to friends and neighbors was too good to refuse. The couple took the leap and relocated, bringing their longtime designer, Katie Schroder, along for the ride.

The home that caught their eye was designed as a contemporary take on the traditional Craftsman style. Working with architect Kathy Eichelberger Jones, Schroder was able to tailor the under-construction home to the clients with custom finishes and the addition of a playroom between the sons’ bedrooms, but the overriding mandate was to make the space warm and inviting. “The main goal was that this house be livable,” says Schroder. “They wanted a kid- friendly, dog-friendly house that looks beautiful, but where you aren’t afraid to sit down and relax.”

This was not the first interiors rodeo for Schroder and the couple. The husband (a software engineer) and the wife (a social worker) had also hired her to redesign their previous home. “By this time, I knew them very well, so working together was second nature,” says the designer. But that didn’t mean Schroder didn’t have surprises in store. “Katie can envision how best to use a space and, like us, she has two boys and she understands the needs of a family,” says the wife. “But she also knows how to nudge you out of your comfort zone.”

In this case, those style nudges mainly dealt with the color palette. The designer (whose firm’s motto is “color, pattern, culture”) notes that “this couple has a very British sense of color but viewed through a Colorado lens.” With that in mind, Schroder decided that although the house they left behind was done in shades of green, a new blue hue was required. “She practically fired green,” jokes the wife, who is now a blue convert. But this is far from a monochromatic interior. “You can’t have only blue in a house,” says Schroder, who encouraged the couple to consider a lively palette. That design philosophy is on display in the dining room, where a burnished-yellow ceiling floats above a gray wallpaper with a yellow branch pattern, and in the master bedroom done in many shades of purple and green.

But it was the living room rug that ultimately charted the color course, bringing in purple, green and orange to join blue. “I was chicken about some things,” admits the wife. “When I said I thought the rug had too much coral, Katie showed me how it would work. That’s why a designer is important.” For Schroder, it’s those votes of confidence that are key to a successful design. “In fashion, people have been given permission to mix patterns to create a boho look, and I think they’re starting to want that more in their homes now, too,” she says. “These clients trusted me, and that kind of trust is important if you want to create an extraordinary interior.”

The designer says that whimsy also played a role here as well, especially in the light fixtures. Rather than choosing a traditional chandelier for the dining room, for example, she opted for a pair of “cool, spidery lights that add a modern twist.” And in the powder room, she skipped typical sconces for the surprise of a curvaceous brass library light over the vanity. “This is a house where the fun little details add up to something great,” Schroder says.

It turns out the new home was a fit in unexpected ways. “At first we thought the house might be too big, but we use every inch,” says the wife. With everyone working and attending school at home, the husband uses the office, the older son uses the bonus room, the youngest son sits at the dining table and the wife is stationed in the breakfast nook. Even the dogs have their go-to spaces, one claiming the back of the sofa and the other a cozy niche below the stairs. The home’s basement level was intended to do double duty as a play and study area for the kids, but the pandemic has changed everyone’s needs and it now serves handily as an entertainment space for the whole family. “With all of us at home, including the boys and dogs, our home has to be livable. But Katie has also made it special,” says the wife. “We are very happy here.” Proof that change can be for the better.

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